11X29 Kitchen Design Help Wanted...

Business By Cakenicing4u Updated 2 Feb 2009 , 6:15pm by Cakenicing4u

Cakenicing4u Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 10:35pm
post #1 of 20

I was just downtown measuring what will be my kitchen in two months or so, and I'm trying to give them an idea of the plumbing and electrical needs I will have. So imagine a room 11x29 with one 29' wall filled with windows, (the windows are high enough to allow for counters or tables. )The other wall is a blank slate. The back 11' wall is blank, the other has a doorway big enough for french doors right in the center. The plumbing will be run from the side of the french doors along the blank 29' wall.

I also have a front room which is going to be my display and consultation area, with a bathroom, entrance and possibly office and storage area... so you don't have to plan those things in that room. thumbs_up.gif

I'll take any and all hints and suggestions... this is my equipment list, but I'm not that attached to my stuff, so if it goes, it goes!

3 or 4- refrigerators, (if i need the one in my basement, i'll move it)
1 or 2- upright freezers (if i need the one in my mom's house, it's mine)
1- 2 bay stainless steel sink
1- 6ft maple top table
1- 8ft table with a sink all the way to the right of the table, built in.
1- 4' stainless table
1- Blodgett commercial oven
1- 30 qt Hobart mixer
6- baking racks for 18x26 pans
1- glass top cooking surface (burners)
1- household size oven (separate from the burners)
household washer and dryer

I'm seeing the blank 29' wall filled with all the big equipment sinks, mixer, oven etc... and the one with windows getting a new countertop.

It's a blank slate... and I get one week to decide... HELP PLEASE!

Thanks!

19 replies
Mencked Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 10:49pm
post #2 of 20

Wow--I'm doing the exact same thing as you! I drew out my floor area to scale and then drew everything that I was going to put into it (frig, oven, sink, etc.) to scale as well (graph paper is your friend). Be sure to put in all windows, fuse box, etc., on your plan. I cut out the equipment pieces and then began fitting it here and there, keeping in mind where my water was, etc., and placing it according to basics learned in home ec. and thinking about how I cook and what I'll need where. This is an exciting time for sure!!

Cakenicing4u Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 11:07pm
post #3 of 20

YAHOO! A sister in stress! I already have my graph paper out, and a few kitcheny magazines to give me ideas for storage, etc..

Also, I forgot one piece of equipment...

1- 4' refrigerated table that we hope will work when it gets plugged in!

bisbqueenb Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 11:35pm
post #4 of 20

Don't forget to think about steps between items...do you want the refrigerator close to working tables...working tables close to a hand washing area....working area close to the front so you can keep an eye on the incoming crowd? You don't want to have to run from one end to the other for everything you do.....think about grouping work areas...storage areas...things that 'go together' in a routine.

leah_s Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 1:44am
post #5 of 20

ANY restaurant supplies store where you will purchase your equipment (refrigerators, freezers, oven) has someone on staff to do the layout for you.

-Tubbs Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 1:47am
post #6 of 20

I know a Health Inspector, and she had some great suggestions for me from a health point of view, which I'll pass on in case it helps you (I have no idea about your equipment placement - my kitchen is going to be in a 10x14' basement room!)

You probably know this already, but I'll mention it just in case: She told me to make sure my storage, prep, cooking, garbage and dishwashing areas are clearly separated but flow well. Hence, try not to have your dishwashing area right next to where your baked goods are being decorated etc. The separation between cooked and uncooked foods needs to be clear to reduce the possibility of cross-contamination (unlikely, with baking, but possible).

Good luck with your adventure!

jillmakescakes Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 1:53am
post #7 of 20

Ok, I LOVED this site: http://beta.floorplanner.com/login

this lets you program your room size, equipment size, everything. You can add outlets and everything. You can even look at it 3D!! We used this for our kitchen and it worked wonderfully. My major suggestion would be to make sure your equipment fits through the door. Mine is an older building so we had to take off the door frame (not just the door, but the frame too--talk about work).

Hope this helps and send pics when you get them!!!

CakeForte Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 1:54am
post #8 of 20

floorplanner.com is a free website to layout rooms and areas. Basically it draws your room to scale and then you can place in all of your equipment and items and see what it will look like. It also gives you an option to see your layout in 3D.

It should help you with you questions. Its pretty easy to use.

Cakenicing4u Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 2:18am
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jillmakescakes

My major suggestion would be to make sure your equipment fits through the door. Mine is an older building so we had to take off the door frame (not just the door, but the frame too--talk about work).

Hope this helps and send pics when you get them!!!




THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I had not even thought about this at all!!! Because the upstairs is going to be rented as an apartment, the entrance comes through the front door, then thru a left door for me, and up a flight of stairs and through a door for the tenants!!! The side door is a standard 30' door, and right now, there's a way of doing it, but once the drywall goes up, it won't be there any more!

PRICELESS words of wisdom! I already emailed the builder so we can work it out before the plumbing, electric, etc. gets installed!!

And, Thanks for the online sites.. Can't wait to go play with them!

It's all coming together!

indydebi Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 2:27am
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by bisbqueenb

Don't forget to think about steps between items...do you want the refrigerator close to working tables...working tables close to a hand washing area....working area close to the front so you can keep an eye on the incoming crowd? You don't want to have to run from one end to the other for everything you do.....think about grouping work areas...storage areas...things that 'go together' in a routine.



Not only do you not want to run all over the place, but most HD have a say in how this is set up. The logic is that if your refrigeration is "all the way over THERE" then you are more likely to get out more eggs from the frig to save yourself a trip ... resulting in room temp eggs, which my HD tells me is a no-no.

It has to have a logical flow .... food in storage in the freezer, being moved to the refrigerator, being moved to the food prep area, which is NOT near the dirty dishes which flow into the 3-bay sink and/or dishwasher (dirty on the left .... comes out clean on the right, for example).

As leahs suggested, most places have a kitchen designer-type person on staff. Use their expertise. THe HD is very helpful on design and placement, too.

Sounds like you have this covered, but try to have as much water on one wall as possible. If you have to do any trenching in the concrete floor for pipes and drains, that can become very costly. The fewer feet that need trenched, the lower your construction costs.

Cakenicing4u Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 2:43am
post #11 of 20

icon_redface.gif Do you think I can get that help at the store if I don't buy anything from them? LOL... I got all my equipment at auctions and stuff, so I don't have any professionals to turn to! Just you guys! icon_biggrin.gif

I know about flow and logic from working in bakeries for years... so i'll try to keep that in mind... but ya, since i didn't even think of how my 44" oven was going to get through a 30" door, I need all the help I can get!

Thanks again!

Mencked Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 3:24am
post #12 of 20

Caken-my sister in stress-- I'm so glad you asked these questions--I can't tell you how much this is helping me icon_smile.gif!

Cakenicing4u Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 5:05am
post #13 of 20

Oh ya it's a hardwood floor with a basement level-- the water heater, central air etc, will all be down there. So excited I can hardly sleep!

leah_s Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 1:14pm
post #14 of 20

No, I wouldn't try to get free help from a restaurant supplies store with no intention of buying anything from them. That's just not right.

You can, however, HIRE their designer to lay out the kitchen floor plan.

Cakenicing4u Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 8:38pm
post #15 of 20

Well, after finding out it's going to run me $1500 to fix the door problem, we'll just have to wing it on a whim and a prayer. I don't have a bank loan, and I don't have a lot of money to spend, and the health dept. doesn't require it, so I'll just have to do my best on my own. =( So stressed after getting that call.

Cakenicing4u Posted 1 Feb 2009 , 2:26am
post #16 of 20

Talked to lots of family and friends and came to the conclusion that this door was meant to happen. I have a habit of making BIG cakes without thinking about the size of the door!! My Mid-atlantic show cake went through the door on a huge angle cause It was on a massive board! AND... then there was that cake we decorated in the car with the AC running because it was a monster... and we had it on a 4' round board! LOL.... so it's a blessing to have the door issue now, and not then!

I'm still plugging away... so what comes next???

The ideas or the styrofoams?? LOL... like the chicken or the egg?? Luckily I live pretty close to a place that sells them, so I don't have to pay for shipping. =) It's a little more expensive than Dallas Foam, but it balances out with not paying for shipping, and shipping fees just IRRITATE the crud outta me. Besides, support local business, right??

jillmakescakes Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 1:46am
post #17 of 20

Since you live close, if you need to get extra dummies, it shouldn't be a big deal.

I'd say go ahead and sketch out which cakes you'd like to have on display so that you have a balance- not too many of one color or style and ones that show a variety of styles and your talents. This should give you a good idea of how many and what size dummies you will need.

Also consider if you want to use any stands for the display cakes. I have found this helpful during tastings to show the bride and groom the types of stands they can use.

Cakenicing4u Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 2:07am
post #18 of 20

Good ideas thanks!! I'll be making two different displays- one for in my shop and a second to go over to the sister building where receptions are held- so I don't think I'll have enough ideas for both, LOL! I'm going to have to pull out all the stops and go for it! Do the photos as I go and then end up with cakes for both! Me thinks I will need more fondant!

jillmakescakes Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 6:06pm
post #19 of 20

I totally feel you on the "double" displays. Check out the windows I have to (get to?) fill!!!
LL

Cakenicing4u Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 6:15pm
post #20 of 20

YOWSERS! My front window is the size of one of those windows... that's not what has me nervous though-- it's the display in the sister site... The downstairs is all artists' studios, and the hallways and entrance is their gallery--- then upstairs is the reception hall.... Clever, huh? While the guests are milling around, they are looking at artwork for sale! And my cakes are going to be in that type of artist gallery. I need to be that creative, that good! I know i'm good, I just hope I can make them look THAT good!

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