First Stacked Cake - How Do You Serve It?

Decorating By pipedreams Updated 30 Jan 2009 , 4:09am by indydebi

pipedreams Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:10pm
post #1 of 11

This may seem like a silly question, but I'm going to make a stacked cake for my daughter's birthday. The bottom layer will be 12" and the top layer 8". I plan to frost the cake with butter cream icing. I have read up on stacking cakes and understand how to do the dowl supports, but I'm wondering how the heck do I serve this cake when the time comes?

If I frost the bottom cake and then set the second layer on it's cardboard on top aren't I going to have a big mess when I try to take the top layer off and serve the cake? Do you pull off the top layer and take all the frosting off the bottom layer with it? I'm just picturing a mess pulling out sticks and frosting everywhere. Any tips? Thank you!

10 replies
m1m Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:17pm
post #2 of 11

What I've done in the past is to start serving the top cake first. Then when all of the top cake is cut and served, I start on the second layer.

tammy712 Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:19pm
post #3 of 11

pipedreams
This forum link is similar to what you are asking. Indydebi's website link is in it too. Along with advice from her. Hope it helps.
Tammy

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-608852.html

bizatchgirl Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:21pm
post #4 of 11

That is how I do it also. I actually take the tier off though. I think it's much harder to cut if it is still stacked onto the bottom tier. Just cut and serve top to bottom.

niccicola Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:23pm
post #5 of 11

Well, typically, if you have the dowel rods in the bottom tier and your buttercream icing is crusted over/dried, then it shouldn't stick *too* much when taking off the cardboard from the top tier.

I would cut directly from the top cake and then remove the cardboard (there is less weight on the top holding the cardboard down on the bottom tier) and then cut the bottom cake.

To be honest, I have never had to cut & serve one of my stacked cakes that had dowel rods/cardboard bases. I've cut & served 2 cakes that each had tiers that were stacked directly on top of each other without dowels/cardboard, but that was before I knew better icon_smile.gif

And, now that I think about it, i've never told a client how to disassemble/cut/serve a cake...i've just assumed that they will accept a cake the way it is and it's up to them to decide how they want to destroy it.

KHalstead Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:23pm
post #6 of 11

cut a sheet of waxed paper the same size as your top cake's board and put that on the bottom tier then poke the dowels through it and put on the top layer.......then when the time comes to separate you just lift off the top cake, peel back the waxed paper and remove your dowels....I use the sps system now instead of wooden dowels because I had an "accident" but the waxed paper idea works if you're brave enough to use wooden dowels!

niccicola Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:27pm
post #7 of 11

i'm a devote fan of dowel rods. Dare I ask what this "accident" was that made you switch to sps?

Ayanami Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:44pm
post #8 of 11

Fabulous suggestions. I am doing a 3 tier stacked cake this Saturday & was just wondering the same thing. I have never had to cut one of my own either. I'll try the wax paper thing too.

I have always cut my round cakes the way Indydebi shows on her site, even before I knew what I was doing. icon_razz.gif I just always thought the circle in a circle was just plain stupid. icon_rolleyes.gif IMO

m1m Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 8:50pm
post #9 of 11

I'd love to have Indydebi's site that tells you how to cut a cake. icon_smile.gif

tammy712 Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 3:58am
post #10 of 11

m1m

Here is the link for indydebi's website:

http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page10.html

indydebi Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 4:09am
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by niccicola

Well, typically, if you have the dowel rods in the bottom tier and your buttercream icing is crusted over/dried, then it shouldn't stick *too* much when taking off the cardboard from the top tier.




Totally agree. I've cut 95% of all the wedding cakes I've made and I've never had icing stick to the board/plate. If you look at the link (provided above), you can see the indentation in the tiers where the plate (when I used plastic plates between the tiers) sat right on the cake ... but no icing stuck and pulled away.

The reason I disassmble the cake and cut from the bottom tier up (meaning I cut the largest tier first, then go to the next largest tier) is because if there is any cake leftover, it's going to be the smaller top tier(s) that is/are easier to store. Storing a partially cut 14" or 12" cake can be difficult.

Quote:
Quote:

I have always cut my round cakes the way Indydebi shows on her site, even before I knew what I was doing. I just always thought the circle in a circle was just plain stupid. IMO



icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif hahaha! That's exactly why I started cutting cakes this way forever ago. I tried that circle method once because "....that's how you're POSTA cut a cake" and thought "well this is about the dumbest idea I've ever seen!" icon_eek.gif

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