Chocolate Cake Balls?

Decorating By jovigirl Updated 28 Jan 2009 , 6:52pm by FromScratch

jovigirl Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 1:01pm
post #1 of 12

What kind of Chocolate do you use to dip your cake balls in?

11 replies
jovigirl Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 2:27pm
post #2 of 12

Anyone?

DianeLM Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 2:57pm
post #3 of 12

I use Melt N Mold (Guittard) dark chocolate wafers. I've tried using good chocolate, but honestly, my customers can't tell the difference so I don't bother with the trouble and expense.

LetThereBeCake07 Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 3:04pm
post #4 of 12

i like almond bark. get it from walmart. comes in vanilla or chocolate, melts smooth and tates good too

jovigirl Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 3:39pm
post #5 of 12

Do melted chocolate chips work?

jovigirl Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 4:34pm
post #6 of 12

or I wonder if just using a reg milk chocolate bar would work?

aa053103 Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 4:47pm
post #7 of 12

I agree. I use both almond bark and chocolate bark. It's super inexpensive and you will get alot use out of one package compared to Wilton's chocolate melts.

lindambc Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 5:02pm
post #8 of 12

I have used chocolate wafers I get at Winco in the bulk section and I have used good chocolate and no one knows the difference. As for white chocolate, I have found that Baker's white chocolate melts and sets the best.

FromScratch Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 5:04pm
post #9 of 12

If you use real chocolate you will have to temper it before dipping or it won't set right. It won't be shiney or have that snap to it that you get when you eat a piece of chocolate.

Candy melts and almond bark (confectioner's coating) is an easy way to get around the tempering thing since they aren't real chocolate and behave much nicer for you. I don't love their flavor, but they aren't horrid by any means. Most people will love it since it's very commonly used when dipping candies.

jovigirl Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 6:03pm
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

If you use real chocolate you will have to temper it before dipping or it won't set right. It won't be shiney or have that snap to it that you get when you eat a piece of chocolate.

Candy melts and almond bark (confectioner's coating) is an easy way to get around the tempering thing since they aren't real chocolate and behave much nicer for you. I don't love their flavor, but they aren't horrid by any means. Most people will love it since it's very commonly used when dipping candies.




Thank you for the tip! How do I temper Chocolate icon_confused.gif

TheCakerator Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 6:15pm
post #11 of 12

I use merkens chocolate wafers from a local cake store .. they seem to work pretty well for me ...

FromScratch Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 6:52pm
post #12 of 12

Tempering chocolate can be a pain... it's a process of warming and cooling and then warming it again and keeping it at a constant temperature until you use it. The temp varies with the type of chocolate you use.

Most chocolate sold in stores is already tempered.. if you warm it and don't go past 91 degrees your chocolate will remain in temper. Dark chocolate likes about 88 degrees, milk about 85, and white 80-82. If you heat the chocolate beyond 91 degrees it loses its temper. That is to say that the crystals in the cocoa butter that give the chocolate it's structure become loose and when it sets it will not be beautiful and have that gloss and snap to it. Tempering chocolate can be a pain, but there are a few shortcuts. If you have chocolate that has fallen out of temper you can heat it up to 110-115 degrees and add some "seed chocolate" (or chocolate that is already in temper) and stir that in until it reaches about 80 degrees and then bring the temperature up to 85-88 degrees (or less if it's white) and hold it there until you are done using it. You must be careful to stir often and check the temperature often. You can set the chocolate over a pot of barely simmering water or on a heating pad on low, but whatever you use, be sure to check it often... for having to re-temper untempered chocolate that you just spent time tempering... can make you lose your OWN temper.

They also sell machines that will temper chocolate for you and keep it at the perfect temp, but they are spendy.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%