Pan Sizing And Batter Requirements - Please Help!

Decorating By katielb Updated 28 Jan 2009 , 10:06pm by katielb

katielb Posted 25 Jan 2009 , 6:33am
post #1 of 12

This is a real "newbie" question (or two icon_wink.gif)

The recipe im using makes enough batter to fill 3 8" (20cm) round sandwich tins.

Here is my problem, im using a 13.5" x 9" (34cm x 23cm) rectangular pan, I need 3 layers and prefer to bake them all rather than torte so how do i calculate how much batter I will need for this cake??

Also, going by the above measurements, what sized tin is this?

Thanks in advance for any help on this one.

Katielb icon_smile.gif

11 replies
xstitcher Posted 25 Jan 2009 , 6:54am
post #2 of 12

Easiest thing to do is measure each pan with water to see how much batter it takes and calculate from there.

Also Wilton has a chart that may be of some help although I'm not sure if sheet cakes are listed. If you go to the articles link look for baking/cutting guide.

HTH

icon_smile.gif

JanH Posted 26 Jan 2009 , 12:20am
post #3 of 12

Everything you ever wanted to know to bake your first tiered/stacked/layer cake:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

Above thread has links to all Wilton cake preparation and servings guides. (Gives batter requirements by pan size.) And so much more!

If you prefer to bake separate short layers rather that taller layers to stack (and/or torte) - you might just want to use a jelly roll pan (very short sides) and cut your layers from that.

To bake three separate layers, using the batter requirement for a 13x9x2 pan would require you to divide the 7 cups of batter needed for this pan into 1/3's (1/3 for each layer).

In order to achieve a cake height of around 4" you'll need to make 6 cake layers. (And be prepared for your layers to look and handle like pancakes.)

To be truthful, I don't know how your cakes will turn out... And you'll have to be very watchful of the baking time. (Would bake at 325 F.)

HTH

kkitchen Posted 26 Jan 2009 , 12:35am
post #4 of 12

JanH is extremely resourceful. Thanks a lot thumbs_up.gif

katielb Posted 26 Jan 2009 , 3:37am
post #5 of 12

Thanks everyone for your tips icon_smile.gif

Jan - To get the height of the cake and to ensure the layers werent to thin, id double the recipe - im guessing this would be ok?

JanH Posted 26 Jan 2009 , 7:01am
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by katielb

Jan - To get the height of the cake and to ensure the layers werent to thin, id double the recipe




Now you're confusing me... I thought you wanted thin layers because you didn't want to torte. icon_confused.gif

Are you confusing torting (splitting each layer into one or more shorter layers) with levelling (removing the crown from cake layer so that each layer is same height). icon_surprised.gif

Why not just bake three 13x9x2 cakes (7 cups of batter per layer) and stack (after you level). The stacked layers will be about 6" tall with no torting. icon_smile.gif

If you WANT to split (torte) each layer (in half), you'll wind up with six layers, but you only had to bake three times.

So much easier than baking SIX separate cake layers. (And you might still have to level each one.)

Everything you ever wanted to know about baking, assembling and decorating your first tiered/stacked/layer cake:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

HTH

katielb Posted 26 Jan 2009 , 8:39am
post #7 of 12

Sorry for any confusion, its a sponge cake which doesnt rise all that much. I know what torting and levelling is icon_smile.gif
Unless I was baking it in 1 tin i wouldnt need to torte.
Even when baked in the sandwich tins the cakes still come out quite thin.
The intention was always to bake 3 seperate cakes however i was uncertain as to the amount of batter to use as the tins im using are bigger than what the recipe calls for.
Natutally I need more batter so that the layers arent TOO thin...using the amounts the recipe calls for would result in pancake thin layers - which is what im trying to avoid.

You answered my question by stating the 7 cups of batter per layer, thanks icon_biggrin.gif

JanH Posted 26 Jan 2009 , 8:45am
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by xstitcher

Easiest thing to do is measure each pan with water to see how much batter it takes and calculate from there. icon_smile.gif




You can compare the measurement from the 13x9x2 to the total measurement used for three 8" rounds - and adjust from there. icon_smile.gif

katielb Posted 26 Jan 2009 , 8:52am
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Quote:
Originally Posted by xstitcher

Easiest thing to do is measure each pan with water to see how much batter it takes and calculate from there. icon_smile.gif



You can compare the measurement from the 13x9x2 to the total measurement used for three 8" rounds - and adjust from there. icon_smile.gif


Of course - makes sense - thanks for pointing that out!!
I was so concerned I overlooked the obvious icon_redface.gif

JanH Posted 26 Jan 2009 , 8:59am
post #10 of 12

Well, I obviously didn't understand the question... so I'm right there, too. icon_cry.gificon_redface.gificon_lol.gif

Glad that reposting xstitcher's info was helpful. thumbs_up.gif

All's well that ends well. icon_biggrin.gif

goodiegoddess Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 3:08pm
post #11 of 12

Thanks for posting all this info!! It is amazinG!!!!

katielb Posted 28 Jan 2009 , 10:06pm
post #12 of 12

Jan i think i confused us both lol - i knew what i wanted to ask but didnt communicate it very well :S

But, yep, its all good now icon_smile.gif

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