Why Doctors Are Not Veterinarians

Lounge By emrldsky Updated 12 Feb 2009 , 5:21am by redpanda

emrldsky Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 3:54pm
post #1 of 36

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/search/content/charmpost/epaper/2009/01/12/a3d_brazelton_0112.html

Being a cat owner, I'm appalled at this Doctor's response. I've already written a lengthy (and researched) response and sent it off. :/

35 replies
jen1977 Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 4:24pm
post #2 of 36

I'm not sure what is so appalling about the article? My OB told me not to change a litter box when I was pg. The dr is right about the parasite that cats can carry, and it is dangerous to a fetus. I would rather be safe than sorry when I was pg, and followed all the rules of what not to do or eat.

CakeDiva73 Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 4:47pm
post #3 of 36

Hi - I know as animal lovers we often cannot fathom people who talk smack about our beloved pets but in this case, it is better to err on the side of caution. icon_smile.gif

I have 4 children and my cats were here long before they were born. I also was advised, both thru books and by my OB/GYN to have my husband take over the catbox cleaning chores due to the risk of parasites.

My 8-10 lb cat is famous for jumping upon me at night and settling directly on my chest to take a snooze....I am a full grown woman and he is a bit heavy! It is not uncommon for the cats to smell the milk on babies breathe and venture into the crib, often to lick their lips.

Now considering that cats use their tongue as a veritable washrag, this is not sanitary. Not to mention the posibility of them getting comfortable on top of a nice, warm baby........ 8lbs on an adults chest is a bit heavy but manageable. Instead, imagine something that weighs as much as you do perching on top of you and you being unable to get them off? I think this is what the doctors are referring to.

mbelgard Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 5:20pm
post #4 of 36

Pregnant women not changing the litter box has been standard advice for years.

For the keeping the cats away from the baby think about a cat's love of warm spots. I know that my cats LOVE the top of the iguana tank because it's warm. Well babies are too and they're not strong enough to push a cat off of them and cats often weigh as much as a baby.

I never let my cats in the same room as the baby when they were sleeping. I also would not allow a dog to be around a very small child without supervision.

As for getting rid of the pets if there is an allergy that's also something that parents sometimes have to do. There is always the option of getting fish or reptiles if they want some kind of pet.

emrldsky Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 5:43pm
post #5 of 36

I was appalled that he offered no suggestions on keeping the cats away from the baby but instead jumped to the "It would be better for the baby if your daughter would rid herself of the cats" bandwagon.

Also, this statement "Some cats will seek out the infants' mouths and noses and lie on them to smother them." assumption. Yes, cats MAY want to lie on or near the baby, but I don't think cats do it to smother them, as he states.

Yes, I know the risks of toxoplasmosis for pregnant women, I also know that women not changing the litter box is a big preventative measure. But to flat out state she would be better off getting rid of the cats is what irritated me. icon_sad.gif

I just think some pregnant women reading that response will think that they have to give away their cats to protect their baby, when that's not the case. :/

krysoco Posted 23 Jan 2009 , 3:35pm
post #6 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by emrldsky

I was appalled that he offered no suggestions on keeping the cats away from the baby but instead jumped to the "It would be better for the baby if your daughter would rid herself of the cats" bandwagon.

I didn't read the article. But it sounds as if his suggestion was to get rid of the cats.


I don't think cats do it to smother them, as he states.

Well I don't think it matters if you think cats do it on purpose or not. It sounds as though you're a cat lover and getting rid of them for your baby's sake is not a option. Which is entirely your choice. icon_smile.gif


I just think some pregnant women reading that response will think that they have to give away their cats to protect their baby, when that's not the case. :/




That probably is the best case. I don't think there is anything wrong w/a doctor informing the public of animal hazards interfering w/the safety and/or health of kids. I think that's the point of being a doctor - to address health concerns.

I'm not picking on you or your response. But if you're appalled, then I'm appalled that you're appalled. icon_lol.gif Cats are very unsanitary creatures. Loving creatures, but not healthy for babies or anyone. I don't have a problem w/ cats but I read an article about their connections to allergies and eczema. It was very interesting but very eye opening to how unsanitary they are. After reading that stuff, I will not own another cat.

Just a side note, ppl who are very comfortable w/their cats usually let them walk around of their countertops, tables, etc. Very unsanitary. I try to refrain from eating at those ppl's houses. Yes I am a germ/bacteria/fungus/parasite freak. Very guilty of it. Sorry! icon_redface.gif

Best of luck to you, your cat, and family. Let us know what works for you on keeping your cats away from your babies. thumbs_up.gif

sarahpierce Posted 23 Jan 2009 , 5:59pm
post #7 of 36

I choose my children over my cats. I think this doctor is letting women know of the hazards. It was a short article and I don't think it was meant to go indepth about what to do to prevent it. In that case, yes a veterinarian would be the one to write the article then. Otherwise, I personaly feel that it was sound scientific advice. Some people don't understand the real hazards when you're pregnant. I wouldn't take this to heart and let it bother you so much. I feel you did the right thing by writing back and expressing your concern. That is the beauty of free speech. But, I will have to agree to disagree with you. Thank you for sharing your opinions with us though. icon_smile.gif

kaat Posted 23 Jan 2009 , 7:10pm
post #8 of 36

"Some cats will seek out the infants' mouths and noses and lie on them to smother them." So let's get rid of all the cats!!
And some parents shake their babies.... so now what?!? IMO the article seemed a little strong and one sided, of course it is only one opinion. Yes there are hazards to having any pets in a home with children and part of a parents' job is to protect the kids. It's why I took precautions - "baby proofed" my house, blocked off stairs etc, taught my pets AND my kids how to interact with each other. What ever happen to a little common sense instead of jumping to extremes?

And yes I am an animal lover and worked in a veterinary clinic through two pregnancies all animals and children have survived... so far icon_wink.gif

Whew! Sorry, that sounds like quite the rant - but I can see the rift that the advice given can cause between mom and daughter - perhaps the advise wouldn't seem so harsh if she was discussing her own pregnancy instead of her daughters...

Deb_ Posted 23 Jan 2009 , 9:37pm
post #9 of 36

I can see the Dr.'s point, he states the facts and gives his advice based on those facts. He's a Dr., so his priority is to protect his patient and err on the side of caution.

Having said that........I'm a cat owner always have been. I had 2 cats when my kids were born and I can honestly tell you they didn't give a second look at the babies when I brought them home from the hospital. They would sleep all day and usually in a warm sunny window far away from the crying baby......they didn't want to be disturbed. That's how all of my cats through the years have been.......not kid lovers at all, and they stay faaaaar away from them.

Now our dog on the other hand. I remember bringing the baby into the family room in the car seat, placing the seat on the floor so I could remove my coat and the baby's snowsuit.........before I could get my coat off my dog was licking the baby's face. UGHHHH!!!!!!! That was freaking disgusting!! My cats have NEVER licked a human! Our dog was so jealous of the baby that we could not leave them alone in a room together. Can you tell I'm a cat person and not a dog person? icon_lol.gif

Fortunately my kids are grown up now and survived living with our dog and cats. You just have to use common sense and not leave the baby alone with any animal......dog, cat, ferret, snake, lizard, goldfish (just checking to see if your paying attention icon_lol.gif ) etc........

krysoco Posted 23 Jan 2009 , 10:03pm
post #10 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27



before I could get my coat off my dog was licking the baby's face. UGHHHH!!!!!!! That was freaking disgusting!! My cats have NEVER licked a human!




If your cat sits on you, you pet it, or it stays on your furniture then you have unknowningly subjected yourself to more cat spit than you'd like to know. Far more spit than a couple licks from the dog's one time lick. Sorry if that grossed anyone out. I like cats but I believe their place is in the barn. I love dogs but my inside dog went outside when I was expecting. Yes, I loved her but my house was/is for my babies.

Deb_ Posted 23 Jan 2009 , 11:54pm
post #11 of 36

Not to disagree, but dogs lick themselves just as much as cats do and are no less likely than cats are to carry germs and pass them on to humans.

I agree 100% with you that obviously humans come before animals, I'm in no way suggesting that they are equal. Just that people need to take the proper precautions and use simple common sense when they have a baby and pets.

BTW......don't ever let your kids roll around in those spit covered balls in the pits at Chuck E Cheese, now those things are GROSS! icon_razz.gif

JanH Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 3:25am
post #12 of 36

After reading the above article, I did some fact checking....

I could find no evidence of any child having their breath sucked out of them by a cat in the U.S.

www.snopes.com has also addressed the claim, "Cats suck the breath from babies, sometimes killing them".

http://www.snopes.com/critters/wild/catsuck.asp

The status of this claim is: False

What is on record, however, are any number of accidental deaths of sleeping children caused by their parents' rolling over onto them, or from their turning around to face into a pillow. Children have also suffocated from being left sleeping on their tummies on waterbeds. And then there is "sudden infant deat syndrome" (SIDS), the inexplicable passing of an otherwise healthy child in its sleep.

It is important to note, that an estimated 30-40% of adults in the United States have antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii.

http://www.addl.purdue.edu/newsletters/2003/winter/Toxoplasmosis.shtml
http://tinyurl.com/bapkly

Stage of pregnancy and health of mother makes difference in fetal outcome:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/229969-overview
(Geographical location and many other factors discussed. Also, oocysts may be transported to food by flies and cockroaches.)

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates that one half of T. gondii infections in the United States are caused by ingestion of raw or undercooked infected meat (3). A community-based study in Maryland, comparing persons who did not eat meat with those who did eat meat, supports the USDA estimate (4). In 1999, Mead and colleagues estimated that of the 750 deaths caused by toxoplasmosis each year, one half were the result of eating raw or undercooked meat, making toxoplasmosis the third leading cause of foodborne deaths (5).

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol9no11/03-0098.htm
http://preview.tinyurl.com/ctnrr2

Life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii:
(Cats do not continually shed oocysts so aren't permanently contagious.)

http://www.dpd.cdc.gov/dpdx/HTML/Toxoplasmosis.htm
http://tinyurl.com/38qkyt

Infection may be prevented by thorough cooking of meat and by proper management of cats. Acute cases are treated with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine.

http://gsbs.utmb.edu/microbook/ch084.htm
http://tinyurl.com/6pokps

A Baby-Ready Pets workshop in New Bedford:

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080418/LIFE/804180327/-1/LIFE15
http://tinyurl.com/c7vatv

Tips from Baby-Ready Pets Program:

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080418/LIFE/804180328/0/LIFE15
http://tinyurl.com/dgrlbx

IMHO any concerns can be resolved through proper handling and management of feline fecal matter. Additional precautions should be taken not to handle raw meat and only eating thoroughly cooked meat.

To insure that no one in the household has to come into direct contact with any feline biological waste.... Here's a "no scoop" high capacity, reservoir type totally automated litter-robot :

http://www.litter-robot.com/default.aspx?ac=1?source=gaw01&gclid=CLPLmZfxpZgCFQ4i3godwn1yng
http://tinyurl.com/dbfhbl

IMHO, this doctor's answer was not accurate AND complete.

As a medical doctor, he should have addressed the greatest threat to pregnant women, infants and children; which sadly, is other human beings....

Sexual Assault Statistics:
(25,000 pregnancies/year in the U.S. are the result of rape.)

http://www.ncdsv.org/images/SexualAssaultStatistics.pdf

Child Abuse and Child Sexual Abuse:
(879,000 substantiated cases in 2000.)

http://www.prevent-abuse-now.com/stats.htm#Allegations
http://tinyurl.com/d8x3yv

Auto related deaths:
(Passenger and pedestrian.)

http://www.carwrecks.com/new.html
http://tinyurl.com/ad7nu5

Seat Belts & Pregnancy:

According to University of Michigan researchers the lives of 200 of the roughly 370 fetuses killed yearly in U.S. vehicle crashes would be spared if all pregnant women wore seat belts.

http://www.news-medical.net/?id=36932
http://tinyurl.com/bo6e2v

The number of homicides of children under age 5 increased through the mid 1990's, but declined recently:

http://ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/homicide/children.htm
http://tinyurl.com/d7a6yj

(Stopped searching at this point, because it was getting depressing.)

HTH

summernoelle Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 3:31am
post #13 of 36

I was a pre vet student at A&M and worked in many different vet offices, research projects, etc. In the offices I worked in, they had pamphlets about toxoplasmosis, warning pregnant woman. There is nothing wrong with that! Hmmmm. Unborn baby, or my cat. Unborn baby....cat. Gee, I wonder which one?

summernoelle Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 3:33am
post #14 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

Not to disagree, but dogs lick themselves just as much as cats do and are no less likely than cats are to carry germs and pass them on to humans.

I agree 100% with you that obviously humans come before animals, I'm in no way suggesting that they are equal. Just that people need to take the proper precautions and use simple common sense when they have a baby and pets.

BTW......don't ever let your kids roll around in those spit covered balls in the pits at Chuck E Cheese, now those things are GROSS! icon_razz.gif




Dogs don't carry toxoplasmosis, which is a parasite. Dogs actually are cleaner than cats.

redpanda Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 3:45am
post #15 of 36

T. Brazelton has been giving that advice for years--at least 17, when I was pregnant with my son. I can understand caution and giving facts about toxoplasmosis, but I think it is unacceptable that he promotes the urban legend about cats intentionally smothering babies. I'm surprised he doesn't just go all out and say that cats suck the breath out of the babies.

It is advice, from "experts" like this, that cause animals to be abandoned. For example, when a couple down the street had a baby, the husband's mother came to visit, and decided to take matters into her own hands. While her son was at work, and the baby's mother was busy, evil-MIL took their pet, an indoor-only cat that they had had since they got married, and dumped him far enough away that (she thought) the cat would be unable to find his way back. I found him later that day when he walked into my house uninvited, when I opened the door to see why my cat was having a fit at the door. A short time later, the husband came by--going door-to-door to see if anyone had seen their cat. I was so happy that they were reunited with their "first baby".

Yes, use precautions when cleaning the litter, and don't let your pets (or diaper-clad children) up on tables or counters. I've been sick many times from children who are not kept home when sick, but have never been made ill from any of the cats I have had over the years.

(Don't get me started about how horrible hand-foot-and-mouth disease is for an adult, not to mention Fifth disease.)

redpanda Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 8:12am
post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by summernoelle

I was a pre vet student at A&M and worked in many different vet offices, research projects, etc. In the offices I worked in, they had pamphlets about toxoplasmosis, warning pregnant woman. There is nothing wrong with that! Hmmmm. Unborn baby, or my cat. Unborn baby....cat. Gee, I wonder which one?




I think that is really a false "choice", though, isn't it? Who is saying you can only have one or the other?

Somehow, I managed to have both, and DH picked up the chore of maintaining the litterbox. 16 years later, he still has that chore. icon_biggrin.gif

But back to what I was saying about it being a false dichotomy...What percentage of women who own cats and don't eat undercooked meat get infected with toxoplasmosis during pregnancy? I would expect that if all expectant women who own cats were to be alarmist and paranoid, what would happen would be the deaths of lots of innocent cats, with very little effect on fetal and infant health.

JanH said it best when she listed risk factor after risk factor that have greater effects on life and limb.

Deb_ Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 2:54pm
post #17 of 36

[quote="summernoelle.... Dogs actually are cleaner than cats.[/quote]

I'd like to see the data that supports this statement. Animals are animals, they all carry germs, bacteria, parasites etc. Please stop trying to "humanize" dogs it's ridiculous, this entire discussion is silly. Like JanH said there are no documented stats of a cat smothering a baby, there are a lot of cases where the parents smothered their own baby.

My dog gets into peoples trash on trash day and eats their garbage, are you telling me you'd be comfortable having him lick your face after that? He also licks himself in areas that most men would be envious of icon_lol.gif , are you telling me there are no germs or parasites on those? He's also been known to eat the cats waste from their litter box, is that clean?

Let's just agree to disagree.........I see this as nothing more than Dog lovers against Cat lovers.

summernoelle Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 3:15pm
post #18 of 36

Redpanda-that is true-I actually had two cats when pregnant with both of my kids, and didn't get rid of them. What I meant was that it seemed like people were saying that toxoplasmosis wasn't an issue or "real", when it is. I prob didn't do a good job explaining that. And I was just saying that in all the offices I worked in, they offered literature to support it. But no, people shouldn't get rid of their cats if they have someone else to empty the box. And also, if the cat is 100% inside, then they aren't going to get toxoplamosis from it. I think that parasite is out of the cat's body and no longer deposited in the feces after about 4 weeks or so, I THINK.
dkelley-we will have to disagree on that one. Since dogs don't carry toxoplasmosis, then they aren't as much of a risk to PREGNANT women. Again, I didn't say it very well last night. And no, I don't like dogs licking my face. icon_smile.gif
This is a stupid conversation-have a great weekend!

redpanda Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 8:23pm
post #19 of 36

Summernoelle, no worries. It sounds like there were two different "conversations" going on, so of course nobody was communicating.

One group of people thought that the other group was saying that cats are too unsanitary to have as pets, especially when pregnant. (which you weren't)

The other group of people thought that the first group was saying that toxoplasmosis isn't a real issue (which they weren't...they were just saying that it wasn't a definitive reason to ditch the cat).

Have a great weekend! (It's raining here, and I am spending the day cleaning closets and drawers, with occasional forays online to bust the boredom.)

taxnerd Posted 25 Jan 2009 , 1:35am
post #20 of 36

Cat and dog issues aside, I actually laughed out loud at this line:

"Carefully washing vegetables and avoiding handling or eating raw meat during pregnancy also will reduce the risk of infection with toxoplasma gondii."

Avoid handling raw meat???? Unless you're a vegetarian, vegan, etc., cooking dinner often involves some degree of handling raw meat. So I guess your options are to eat out or have your husband cook, both of which could be rather risky as well (at least if your husband is like mine and can't really cook).

JanH Posted 25 Jan 2009 , 4:27am
post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxnerd

Cat and dog issues aside, I actually laughed out loud at this line:

"Carefully washing vegetables and avoiding handling or eating raw meat during pregnancy also will reduce the risk of infection with toxoplasma gondii."

Avoid handling raw meat???? Unless you're a vegetarian, vegan, etc., cooking dinner often involves some degree of handling raw meat. So I guess your options are to eat out or have your husband cook, both of which could be rather risky as well (at least if your husband is like mine and can't really cook).




Of the estimated 750 deaths caused by toxoplasmosis in the United States each year, 375 are thought to occur from eating raw or undercooked meat; this makes toxoplasmosis the third-leading cause of US foodborne death (4).

Most T. gondii infections among humans occur in one of three ways:

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/154/4/357
http://tinyurl.com/bxp749

1) by eating raw or undercooked meat containing T. gondii tissue cysts or eating food that has been cross-contaminated with raw/undercooked meat;

2) by ingesting oocysts from soil (for example, through gardening, handling/eating unwashed vegetables, or changing a cat litter box);

or 3) by acquiring congenital infection through the placenta.

Don't think your humorous reaction would be shared by the 375 people YEARLY who get taxoplasmosis from raw/undercooked meat and DIE. icon_sad.gif

Wearing disposable gloves while handling raw meat (and cooking thoroughly) seems like a simple (and cost effective) solution. (Use another pair for washing raw vegetables.)

Preventing cross contamination is also a safe food handling practice that everyone should conscientiously follow, what with most poultry products being contaminated with salmonella. (And don't forget the salmonella outbreak this summer from Mexican tomatoes and peppers, or the 2006 e.coli outbreak in Dole bagged spinach....)

taxnerd Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 1:58am
post #22 of 36

JanH, perhaps you should have read my entire post before telling me that my humorous reaction would not be shared by those have died from toxoplasmosis.

You just made my point while attempting to disagree. You stated that "375 are thought to occur from EATING raw or undercooked meat." I never disagreed with the eating part; I completely agree with it. It's the handling part that I found odd. If safe food handling procedures are followed to prevent cross contamination (which they should be at all times, not just when pregnant), why should handling the meat be a problem?

indydebi Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 2:36am
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

Animals are animals, they all carry germs, bacteria, parasites etc. Please stop trying to "humanize" dogs it's ridiculous, this entire discussion is silly. .....I see this as nothing more than Dog lovers against Cat lovers.




icon_biggrin.gif I'm with ya on this one. I understand how people get very attached to their pets and I am not trying to diminish that at all. (I cried for 4 days when our puppy got out of the house and hit by a car. icon_cry.gif And I'm not a big pet-person. )

But when people tell me their dog/cat is as much "their baby" as my kid, I tell them, "Let me know how much your car insurance goes up when your dog turns 16 and starts to drive." icon_lol.gif

JanH Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 7:05am
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxnerd

JanH, perhaps you should have read my entire post before telling me that my humorous reaction would not be shared by those have died from toxoplasmosis.




I did read your entire post.... I still don't find your flippant remarks humorous or helpful.

I'm sorry what you posted did not convey what you were trying to express.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taxnerd

Avoid handling raw meat???? Unless you're a vegetarian, vegan, etc., cooking dinner often involves some degree of handling raw meat. So I guess your options are to eat out or have your husband cook, both of which could be rather risky as well (at least if your husband is like mine and can't really cook).




If your remarks had addressed safe food handling practices, my response would have been different.

I responded to what I saw/read (at the time) not what you're saying you meant now.

HTH

Deb_ Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 1:48pm
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

Animals are animals, they all carry germs, bacteria, parasites etc. Please stop trying to "humanize" dogs it's ridiculous, this entire discussion is silly. .....I see this as nothing more than Dog lovers against Cat lovers.




But when people tell me their dog/cat is as much "their baby" as my kid, I tell them, "Let me know how much your car insurance goes up when your dog turns 16 and starts to drive." icon_lol.gif




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Exactly! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Also, I've yet to have to pay for braces for any of my animal's teeth icon_biggrin.gif

Did you guys hear about the couple somewhere here in the US who recently had their dog cloned? Apparently, they never had children and they loved their dog so much they froze his DNA. After the dog died they paid, are you ready for this...............150 THOUSAND dollars to have him cloned. icon_eek.gif

summernoelle Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 2:52pm
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

Animals are animals, they all carry germs, bacteria, parasites etc. Please stop trying to "humanize" dogs it's ridiculous, this entire discussion is silly. .....I see this as nothing more than Dog lovers against Cat lovers.




But when people tell me their dog/cat is as much "their baby" as my kid, I tell them, "Let me know how much your car insurance goes up when your dog turns 16 and starts to drive." icon_lol.gif



icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Exactly! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Also, I've yet to have to pay for braces for any of my animal's teeth icon_biggrin.gif

Did you guys hear about the couple somewhere here in the US who recently had their dog cloned? Apparently, they never had children and they loved their dog so much they froze his DNA. After the dog died they paid, are you ready for this...............150 THOUSAND dollars to have him cloned. icon_eek.gif




Yes! I worked on the research project in college! It was called the Missyplicity project and was done at A&M. They had tons of doges that they would transfer and implant embryos on. Part of the funding was for the recreation of the dogs, so my job was to take them to this huge play area for 2 hours each day. Sounds boring, but it was a ton of fun. Also got to stand in on surgeries and sonograms. I remember it took forever for an embryo transfer to happen, and was there when they finally got it to work. (Not the clone, just a transfer). That was cool. Kind of miss that. icon_sad.gif
Anyway, once they were done with the dogs, they adopted them out. (Very rare for research projects) That was a whole other phase of the project-the team who tried to find all the dogs homes.

Deb_ Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 5:12pm
post #27 of 36

summernoelle it sounds like a very fun and interesting job. Do you still work with animals? (besides bridezillas.....just kidding icon_lol.gif )

When I heard this clone story my first thought was, how does this couple really know that it was successful and they didn't just give them a puppy of the same breed as their original dog? Are the personalities exact in the cloned animal?

I can think of a lot better things to do with 150k, especially in this economy. It takes all kinds to make the world go around icon_rolleyes.gif

taxnerd Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 5:26pm
post #28 of 36

I apologize if anyone misunderstood my prior remark. I did not mean to make light of anyone's death or illness. I felt that the post was clear in that I was questioning the handling part, not the eating part, but apparently it was not. My apologies again to anyone who was offended. icon_redface.gif

snowboarder Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 6:22pm
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxnerd

I apologize if anyone misunderstood my prior remark. I did not mean to make light of anyone's death or illness. I felt that the post was clear in that I was questioning the handling part, not the eating part, but apparently it was not. My apologies again to anyone who was offended. icon_redface.gif




For what it's worth, I understood your prior remark perfectly and didn't think you were making light of anyone's death or illness.

krysoco Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 6:46pm
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowboarder

Quote:
Originally Posted by taxnerd

I apologize if anyone misunderstood my prior remark. I did not mean to make light of anyone's death or illness. I felt that the post was clear in that I was questioning the handling part, not the eating part, but apparently it was not. My apologies again to anyone who was offended. icon_redface.gif



For what it's worth, I understood your prior remark perfectly and didn't think you were making light of anyone's death or illness.




ditto, no offense taken here. I understood from the begining.

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