Can Cake Batter Be Used A Day Or 2 After It Was Made?

Decorating By sarahd Updated 3 Feb 2009 , 3:22pm by tx_cupcake

sarahd Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 2:52am
post #1 of 20

I had to make a cake tonight but did not need all the batter for the pan used. Can you put cake batter in the fridge and use it at a a day or so later?

19 replies
Deb_ Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 2:56am
post #2 of 20

I wouldn't, I'd be concerned that it would lose some of it's leavening. When I have extra batter I make one or two layers to freeze for tastings or a quick birthday cake or last minute order.

sarahd Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 2:59am
post #3 of 20

That's what I was thinking, but was not sure. Thank you.

Danielle1218 Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 3:03am
post #4 of 20

That is a good idea....guess I need a bigger freezer

leah_s Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 3:43am
post #5 of 20

Sure you can hold batter. I do it ALL the time. If you've ever worked in a bakery you know that they wouldn't survive without holding batter.

dessert1st Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 4:40am
post #6 of 20

Leahs, do you add more baking piowder or anything to make sure it rises nicely? I've noticed (or at least I thought I did) that when I let batter sit, while waiting for the cake pan I need to come out of the oven, the next cake baked in it doesn't see to raise as nicely. Hmmmmm??

indydebi Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 4:55am
post #7 of 20

I also have kept extra batter in the frig ... for more than a day or two ... cakes baked fine.

MaisieBake Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 5:12am
post #8 of 20

I think it would depend on where your rise/leavening is coming from.

I'd try it (with backup plans if it didn't work) for box mix. Scratch, especially anything that's all or mostly soda as opposed to powder (because soda fizzes only once, and that's when it gets wet; powder has a second rise when it's heated), and for sure anything that's based on whipped egg whites, no way.

dessert1st Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 1:38pm
post #9 of 20

Thanks for the confirmation indydebi. That will help out since I don't have multiples of some of my pan sizes. When you and leahs endorse something, I take it as gospel. I've learned so much from both of you!

MaisieBake, you explained it well, Thanks.

leah_s Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 1:54pm
post #10 of 20

I've even held Italian Creme cake batter, which gets a lot of its leavening from beaten egg whites. It probably is the least successful as it gets denser, but it still makes cake. I always bake from scratch. And no I don't add any extra leavening. Occasionally I will add an extra scoop of batter to the pan as a guard against any loss of leavening.

Right now I have both white and chocolate batter in my fridge.

banba Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 3:57pm
post #11 of 20

Leah I am curious would the then baked cake stay fresh for as long as a cake baked upon mixing the batter?

I am also curious if some bacterial growth would have occured while storing unused cake battter?

Would you not have to bake that cake at a really high temp to kill the baddy (bacteria)?

Sorry so many questions. It's just that from a homebakers perspective bakeries use a lot of artificially enhanced products whereas I don't. So my ingredients would not have the shelf life or bacterial growth inhibitors of some of the ingredients used in bakeries.

Surely the igredients in the batter are deteriorating while sitting in the fridge?

leah_s Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 4:05pm
post #12 of 20

All I can tell you is:
I'm a scratch baker.
I'm a licensed home kitchen.
I've been doing this for going on 10 years.
I don't have a problem with the batter, nor the fresh-keeping qualities of the cake.
Your mileage may differ.

banba Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 5:49pm
post #13 of 20

thanks Leah, was curious to the answers of some of those questions but if you don't notice any difference in ingredient and end product quality then great.

I have about the same mileage on the clock too with regards to home baking.

I am very interested in the whole concept of holding over batter as it's something I have never done or come across until coming onto CC.

The differences in peoples baking approaches are quirky and it's good to question and learn.

While this is something that works for people that do it I am still quiet interested in knowing what is going on in that bowl of batter while it is in the fridge?

leah_s Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 7:00pm
post #14 of 20

Well, if the batter was refrigerated promptly and the fridge is at the proper temp, nothing.

indydebi Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 7:38pm
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Well, if the batter was refrigerated promptly and the fridge is at the proper temp, nothing.



I was going to mention this, too. My observation is that a commercial refrigerator holds a colder temp than a home refrigerator. Veggies go bad in my home frig (and it's set at the coldest setting) within about 3-5 days, but veggies are still good in my comm'l 'frig for 10 days or more. This is probably why health depts, in general, require comm'l grade refrigeration.

TerriNM Posted 1 Feb 2009 , 5:22pm
post #16 of 20

For the portion of the batter that has been refrigerated, do you let it come to room temp before baking or put directly from fridge to pan to a preheated oven?

leah_s Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 7:25pm
post #17 of 20

Meh . . .either.

Srsly, you guys make this harder than it really is.

TerriNM Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 3:12pm
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Meh . . .either.

Srsly, you guys make this harder than it really is.




lol describes me to a "T" !! Thanks icon_smile.gif

Mencked Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 3:22pm
post #19 of 20

What is the longest you can "hold" batter in the frig?

tx_cupcake Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 3:22pm
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Veggies go bad in my home frig (and it's set at the coldest setting) within about 3-5 days, but veggies are still good in my comm'l 'frig for 10 days or more. This is probably why health depts, in general, require comm'l grade refrigeration.




Okay, this is WAAAY off topic, but I just bought some of those Debbie Meyer Green Bags (yes, from the infomercial) and dang if they don't work like a champ! Veggies stay good for a good week and a half in my home fridge! I'd bet in a commercial fridge you could keep 'em for a month.

Sorry to hijack... I'm just excited when things work!

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