Flower Nails

Decorating By Sixtoes Updated 24 Jan 2009 , 5:33pm by rezzygirl

Sixtoes Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 6:37am
post #1 of 13

I know what Flower nails are, and I want to use them for a heat source while baking but I do not know how to use them. They seem to be easier to use than the heating core. How do I go about using them?

Thanks... icon_confused.gif

12 replies
JanH Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 6:52am
post #2 of 13

There's a section on using inverted flower nails in place of heating cores in this thread:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

HTH

Shannie13 Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 6:54am
post #3 of 13

They are really easy to use...I grease mine just like I would the pan, then I put the flat end down in the center of the cake pan and gently ladle some of the batter around it so that it doesn't go sliding to the edges. then I fill up my cake pan like normal and bake away. You just have to be careful when turning the pan out, especially if you use your hands those little points can sting if there is too much pressure.

Really easy and no real mess...lifting the nail is simple and leaves the tiniest hole.
Hope this helps
Shannie

SpringFlour Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 6:55am
post #4 of 13

Spray them with cooking spray or cover with shortening, place with the "head" down in the pan (pointy side up), then pour in the batter. When you turn your cake out to cool, pull the nail out by its head. A circle (metal) cookie cutter works, too...same way: grease it, put it in the pan, fill with batter, pull it out after you turn out the cake to cool.

Sixtoes Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 7:19am
post #5 of 13

Thank you for all the info, since I am new at this...I need all the help I can get icon_redface.gif !!

CakeDiva73 Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 7:24am
post #6 of 13

Hmmm.... I pour the batter in first, spray Pam on all sides and top of the nail and place it flat surface down and push into the batter whilst rotating the cake nail clockwise (or counter - whatever) give one extra push around when you hit bottom. You can almost feel that little suction when it's down as far as it can go.....then bake as normail.

When cakes have cooled. I flip them onto racks and gently twist and pull the nail out (rotating it as I go so as not to pull out a chunk of cake). And I often use several on any cake larger than a 10".

Do it whatever way works, I am can do it this way very fast but really, either way would work just fine, I'm sure.

muddpuppy Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 1:50pm
post #7 of 13

I line my pans with parchment and so I can poke the nail through the paper before I fill the pan.. I find it easier to remove the cake, and the nail too!

CookiezNCupcakez Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 4:17pm
post #8 of 13

icon_redface.gif When would u need to use a flowernail?

SpringFlour Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 12:36am
post #9 of 13

Some people always use them, some use them only when baking a larger cake...10" or more. I think you have to just play around with it and see what works for you. Although I have used them, I do it only rarely. I use Bake Even strips and swear by those! Everyone has their own method!

Sixtoes Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 5:22am
post #10 of 13

How do you use Bake Even Strips?
Thanks

JanH Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 6:55am
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sixtoes

How do you use Bake Even Strips?
Thanks




The info on flowers nails as well as bake-even strips can be found in this thread:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188.html

Also has info on making your own pan grease.

In fact, it's called the everything you ever wanted to know about baking, assembling and decorating your 1st tiered/stacked/layer cake because it contains so much info. icon_lol.gif

Why not give it a look see. icon_smile.gif

HTH

milissasmom Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 7:05am
post #12 of 13

This is exactly what I do...works like a charm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeDiva73

Hmmm.... I pour the batter in first, spray Pam on all sides and top of the nail and place it flat surface down and push into the batter whilst rotating the cake nail clockwise (or counter - whatever) give one extra push around when you hit bottom. You can almost feel that little suction when it's down as far as it can go.....then bake as normail.

When cakes have cooled. I flip them onto racks and gently twist and pull the nail out (rotating it as I go so as not to pull out a chunk of cake). And I often use several on any cake larger than a 10".


rezzygirl Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 5:33pm
post #13 of 13

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