Putting Price Under Cake Photos On Website?your Opinions ?

Business By isista Updated 23 Jan 2009 , 7:14am by isista

isista Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 9:10am
post #1 of 30

Hi all,
I plan to built a website.
For pricing issues, I planned to have a order and pricing list that refers to general prices like "our prices for fondant cakes are between 5 to 10 Turkish Lira per serving."

But my hubby said that when i visit an online store if I cannot see prices of the cakes under their picture I will skip and go to another site. As a customer I do not want to search the price , i want to learn what i will be paying..

Seemed reasonable to me. Now I plan to put pictures of the sample cakes & I plan to write the price for 8 servings is say, 56 liras.and on details sections "per serving 7 lira.can be rediesigned up to ..... servings..

What is your opinion?

29 replies
banba Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 9:19am
post #2 of 30

I think you should display your prices. I personally can't stand when there are no prices given on websites and I just hop to another site when this happens.

In shops here all prices of all products must be displayed by law. If you are using your website as your virtual shop window then displaying your prices will increase the amount of people coming to your site.

In this day and age people want to look first and then see what they can afford if you have no prices displayed you are losing potential customers straight away!

MikeRowesHunny Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 9:22am
post #3 of 30

I think it depends on how you intend to price your cakes! What are the variables? Will you offer the design in both buttercream & fondant? Do you have lots of cake flavours where some are far pricier to make than others? If so, I would put the minimum price they could expect to pay for the cake (stating what they are looking at - 6in serves 10 or whatever), and make sure that it very clearly says 'From $xx' I personally have what you originally were going to do, and that is a price range for different iced cakes, but even then I cover my butt by saying 'most' of my cakes fall into this range, because you can bet someone will come along with something that I would have to charge more for lol!

Hope that helps!

isista Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 9:42am
post #4 of 30

Banba , you are saying what my hubby says and i think that is true. This will be my shop..And when you enter a shop you must know what you will pay..But the thing is we have to deal with the extras what bonjovibabe is telling us which is also true..There are always people who comes with something "extra" and how will i cover myself for these??

Well, what my hubby says is to put fondant designs and buttercream designs on separate sections.So when they open fondant section they will all see fondant cake pictures and prices something like that...
I am totally confused. Homebakers here does not quote prices on websites.But is that good?
Any further opinions, ideas??

gottabakenow Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 10:22am
post #5 of 30

I don't think it quite works. Maybe that would be the price for the sizes of that cake, but what if they want completely different sizes?

isista Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 10:33am
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottabakenow

I don't think it quite works. Maybe that would be the price for the sizes of that cake, but what if they want completely different sizes?



plan to write that on "orders & pricing section" something like " a range between 5 to 10 " or may put a contact form for different sizes?

acookieobsession Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 1:34pm
post #7 of 30

what if you put under cake, "As shown cake priced at XX serving XX". And then under every cake you can have "Changes to design, size, or flavors, affect price"

aligotmatt Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 1:50pm
post #8 of 30

My problem with having the price under the cake, like say, in 2007 you did a cake for... but since then your prices have gone up, you would have to go to every single picture and change it to what your current pricing is. Otherwise people will want the cheaper price, or be confused if you explain that was last years price...

My opinion is to have a gallery of photo's and then have a good pricing page. I saw this one cake website that I REALLY like and they have on there, 'cake prices range from $5-$20 per serving' - I can imagine that would deter some people. Maybe say, this is the base price, these are reasons your price would go up...

I considered having a rating system to show people what I mean, but I couldn't organize myself enough to do it... but like a simple design stays at the same base price, a more complex design the price goes up to the next level, and then maybe just title some pictures to show what I deem simple and more complex. So if someone was thinking about what they wanted, looked at the pictures, they could generally figure out what pricing bracket they would fit in to.

isista Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 2:16pm
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by acookieobsession

what if you put under cake, "As shown cake priced at XX serving XX". And then under every cake you can have "Changes to design, size, or flavors, affect price"



yeah i think that is what i was trying to explain.. thanksicon_smile.gif

and Aligotmatt,
I understand what you mean by going to every pic and quoting a new range when prices are up.Oh that will be so much work....

The rating system is a perfect idea that way people will approximately know what to pay..If you do some kind of clasification please do share..

OhMyGanache Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 3:59pm
post #10 of 30

Under each photo on my website, I say something like this:

Fondant covered cake
As shown: 10" & 6" rounds = xx servings
$x.xx per serving

brincess_b Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 4:43pm
post #11 of 30

'prices shown are for that individual cake, the price will vary due to sizes and details, as well as any price increases that have taken place since that cake was made' at the top of the gallery page, prices underneath the pics. and your pricing page will give examples of what details affect price.
it makes me happy to be able to compare prices - just make sure you have a range of cakes, really detailed, simple, different numbers of teirs.
xx

CakeForte Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 4:45pm
post #12 of 30

In doing that, putting pricing under your cakes, you can end up screwing yourself in the end. If the photo is up for a long time, someone will think you cakes are always that price.

A cake that you sold for $500 in 2008 could be $750 in 2009...for the same exact thing.

I personally think it's better to provide a range on the pricing page, with a note that final price is determined by XYZ.

FromScratch Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 4:57pm
post #13 of 30

I think the best would be to put the # of serving below the cakes and have your pricing range listed out. This way they can figure it out easily and you won't have to change a bunch of prices when you up your prices.

leahk Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 5:11pm
post #14 of 30

you could make price catagories- like cat a, cat b, etc.
then you have a pricing page with the price for that category. you could have each catagory by level of difficulty and ingredients. if you list the price for each category as price per serving, then under each cake you write how many servings it is. just make sure to mention that they can scale up and down the number of servings.
i hope this is clear, it makes sense in my head icon_confused.gif

OhMyGanache Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 6:17pm
post #15 of 30

I hate the daily emails asking for quotes on desings, which is why I started listing prices. Now my customers can figure it out themselves - and it saves me a ton of time.

If I have to change the captions due to a price increase, I don't think it would take more than an hour - which is no big deal given how much time having the prices up has saved me.

indydebi Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 6:35pm
post #16 of 30

"Cake as shown will serve 150 people and sold for $450 in 2007."

The problem is the "stupidity" of the American public. You can put all the disclaimers in the world under that photo, and I swear to high heaven, when you quote them a price of $800 for 200 servings, they will stomp their little foot and adamently point out "but your website says that cake is only $450!!!"

And while flour has gone up 400%, and eggs have gone up 78% and gas was selling at $4.00/gallon, they will complain about how you doubled your price just so you could make twice as much money from them ..... somehow they will forget the fact that the same price increases THEY are paying are also affecting your cost of doing business.

Here's another thread that has some thoughts on this topic: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-6216585-.html#6216585

Kitagrl Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 6:42pm
post #17 of 30

I used to, to avoid cheap people wasting my time on the phone or email.

However I soon realized that high-end websites never share prices. You know...the fancy restaurants that show a menu without a price.... and I figured if I wanted to be high-end, I should assume that people are ordering from me because they want what I offer; NOT because I'm the cheapest around.

Now I do have people who will price check and will go with me partially because they like my price (always makes me mad when I find out too LOL) but overall I'd like to be known as high-end...someone who does anything the customer wants...for a price that is less important than the quality of the service.

Kay_NL Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 6:48pm
post #18 of 30

No local cake makers or decorator's here show their prices on their websites so I don't either! I don't mind doing up quotes and sending them out, for me it adds a bit of a personal touch and you get a feel for a customer from their emails...

Wing-Ding Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 6:53pm
post #19 of 30

I wouldn't put an exact price on the website. With prices on supplies, gas and everything else in the world these days, how can you honor the pricing you post on a website without changing it every 3 months?

If you are making custom cakes, people should expect to pay custom prices. I know that's now always how it works, but I wouldn't expect to see pricing on custom cakes anywhere on the internet. The ones I usually see are the ones who post the pricing per slice and depending on what's it's made out of. You could list the pricing per slice and let them know what the upcharge would be per slice for special colors, fondant, special recipes, etc.

Wing-Ding Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 6:55pm
post #20 of 30

That's supposed to be -"not" always how it works,-

MikeRowesHunny Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 6:59pm
post #21 of 30

One more thought - your customers might not appreciate you displaying how much they paid for a cake to all and sundry! Just a thought

pieceofcake20 Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 7:05pm
post #22 of 30

I have a seperate link on my page that has a pricing chart. I think it gives people a pretty good idea about how much their cake will cost. Feel free to go check it out. I put an explanation under it to explain how the chart works.
http://pieceofcakepricing.blogspot.com/

isista Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 7:01am
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

"Cake as shown will serve 150 people and sold for $450 in 2007."

The problem is the "stupidity" of the American public. You can put all the disclaimers in the world under that photo, and I swear to high heaven, when you quote them a price of $800 for 200 servings, they will stomp their little foot and adamently point out "but your website says that cake is only $450!!!"



Indydebi, you are great icon_lol.gif And believe me that "stupidity" happens here too. I sometimes find myself repeating the same thing for same people...

Well, I thank everybody for their opinions and I know what you mean ...
Well here in Turkey that job/hobby is not widespread as USA.
So, poeple are generally suprised what they see and what effects us cake decorators is "wow that must be really really expensive let's stay away" because of that they think" why bother asking prices? it MUST be very expensive.."
Yes, it is not like a cake you buy from a market but my price range is like a high end bakery and when they hear it may sound reasonable to them.I want them to think yeah i can order from her for my sons birthday etc...That was my opinion ..

Pieceofcake20, thanks for the link.It is a pretty clear explanation and i liked it , it gives an idea.That can be used or i will stick to price ranging cause a lot of CCers voted for it and see what happens...

I will take a cup of tea and read comments again and try to decide...
Thanks again for your help...

MaisieBake Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 6:10pm
post #24 of 30

I'm not getting why you would post prices from 2007. No one's going to call you and ask for a cake for 150 for some Saturday in March 2007, right?

Keeping your web site updated ("prices start at $X per serving" or "to serve 25, $X") is part of the business side of doing business.

aligotmatt Posted 21 Jan 2009 , 8:27pm
post #25 of 30

It's just that depending on how many pictures and how many prices, it could take some time to adjust all the prices... I have well over 100 pictures on my website, if each was listed with a price, and then the price of eggs tripled, and I had to go in and change every single one, it would take quite a hours...

Maybe a couple of pictures on your pricing page would work in a couple of price ranges, to give people an idea of size to price...

indydebi Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 3:18am
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaisieBake

I'm not getting why you would post prices from 2007. No one's going to call you and ask for a cake for 150 for some Saturday in March 2007, right?




Quote:
Originally Posted by aligotmatt

It's just that depending on how many pictures and how many prices, it could take some time to adjust all the prices...




What aligotmatt said .... between my two websites, I have over 200 photos. I can't (or don't know how to) change the description on pics on my Flickr site, so as far as my knowledge is at this point, once I put a price under one of those pics, then it's pretty much locked in.

MaisieBake Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 5:01am
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

between my two websites, I have over 200 photos. I can't (or don't know how to) change the description on pics on my Flickr site, so as far as my knowledge is at this point, once I put a price under one of those pics, then it's pretty much locked in.




Three things:

1. How often are you adjusting your prices, anyway? Are you following every step in egg prices, or are you rejiggering quarterly, half-yearly or yearly?

2. So, and I'm asking this seriously, what good does it do to show prices that are two years out of date? They can't possibly be accurate any more and most consumers don't want to hear "but it's X% more expensive now than you've been assuming based on information I just gave you."

3. If you can't maintain your website, you've got a site design issue. Maybe Flickr isn't the best way tool for you to use. Maybe you're looking at pricing by categories (A cakes, B cakes, whatever) and keeping price guidelines on a separate page. Alternatively, maybe you keep the design and get an intern or high school kid to come in every quarter and do data entry.

indydebi Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 5:15am
post #28 of 30

Maisie, of course I don't adjust pricing with every egg price jump. The price of eggs and flour changes with every truck delivery, so obviously that would be ridiculous. I try to limit my cake price adjustments to annually.

I also do catering and with all of my documents and menus, it DOES take me considerable time to update all the places where I have pricing documented .... to add 200 photos to that list is an undue burden that I've no interest in adding to the workload.

And all the reasons you list is why I don't put a price per cake on the pic. It was listed just as an option for those who wanted to put a price per cake under the pic. I agree it may look silly to put a 2-year old price under a pic. I agree that any pricing should be current. I choose not to price each cake individually (a) to avoid the confusion (b) to reduce my workload and (c) since I have a flat-price pricing structure, it's a no-brainer for them to figure out now much their cake is going to cost because this cake for 100 will cost the exact same price as THAT cake for 100 which costs the exact same price as the OTHER cake for 100.

My Flickr site is a supplemental site, not my main site. It's designed primarily for a photographer's site, to hold large amounts of pics, which is why I use this space for about two bucks a month. I maintain my business website myself just fine.

I dont' have A cakes or B cakes. My cakes are flat-priced. No bells. No whistles. No nickels. No dimes.

ginger6361 Posted 23 Jan 2009 , 5:59am
post #29 of 30

I DO NOT HAVE A BUSINESS. jUST MAKE CAKES SPECIAL ORDER FOR FRIENDS AND CO WORKERS, AND THEY ALWAYS END UP COSTING ME MONEY. I CHARGE FOR SUPPLIES, BUT DO NOT KNOW HOW TO CHARGE FOR TIME. SOMETIMES 6 TO 8 HOURS PER CAKE DUE TO DESIGN. HOW DO I PRICE THEM AND AT LEAST COME OUT EVEN? ANY HELP IS APPRECIATED.

isista Posted 23 Jan 2009 , 7:14am
post #30 of 30

Ginger6361 hi,

For the time spent ,You only can know the value. I basically have a hourly rate -like a worker- on my mind. In my opinion that is something only you can determine. You must be paid for all supplies and your effort.

there are a lot of topics about that in how do i & cake decorating business section about pricing issues. May be you could search from there , they give a lot of idea..
Happy baking

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