My Baking Core Fell Over During Baking

Decorating By -K8memphis Updated 22 Jan 2009 , 3:15pm by -K8memphis

-K8memphis Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 3:00am
post #1 of 19

My baking core fell over during baking. This is so annoying. It's not the first time either. icon_rolleyes.gif

I'm baking a big ole 10" pound cake and the baking core does a nose dive half way through the bake. It's one of those for really baking cores you buy just sitting in a 3" deep 10" pan. Well not sitting anymo-ore, is it now.

icon_lol.gif

I mean how do you anchor it down. I've seen people use them upside down where the opening is up and the narrower end is touching the pan. So it's in a funnel shape rather than a volcano shape in the cake. If you can picture that.

But It's a parchment lined pan.

Oh, I thought of something. I moved it over a teensy bit after I poured in the batter. I bet I got batter under it. Dang it!

How do you anchor yours down? Do yours ever tip over like that?

18 replies
Doug Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 3:10am
post #2 of 19

i always thought you were supposed to use it "funnel shaped" and fill the inside of the core w/ batter too.

but then...

I just use flower nails (and nearly impale myself on them sometimes!)

-K8memphis Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 3:23am
post #3 of 19

You're probably right. But why does it flare out around the lip of the widest part? It makes it look to me like it should sit volcano shaped. However, it doesn't really work that way does it (Kate!). icon_biggrin.gif

Type a little slower for me, Doug. icon_lol.gif

Doug Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 3:25am
post #4 of 19

flares to catch the heat?

flower nails -- much easier (tho' always waiting to attack!)

-K8memphis Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 4:13am
post #5 of 19

Yah this is a big momma cake that needed a big hole in it. Not necessarily a lopsided hole, but we'll take what we can get.

I'll make another one & do it the other way & report back.

Rather than a rose nail--mine would fall apart, I use folded up aluminum foil with feet.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=68445&view=findpost&p=936954

It's pictured in that post which is the 12th post, ^^^ the fourth picture.

Just fold it and tear it on one end and fold each 'foot' in an opposite direction so it will stand on the counter. I spray it with pam. Works great.

Doug Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 4:15am
post #6 of 19

will have to try that

sugarshack Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 4:47am
post #7 of 19

u fill the hetaing core with batter and that holds it on place

-K8memphis Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 5:02am
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarshack

u fill the hetaing core with batter and that holds it on place




Why is it bigger on top? I mean you're not gonna be able to slip a knife down there to release it because of the overhang. I guess you could wrap it with foil so the foil sticks to the cake and you can pull the core out. But you could just grease it good I guess.

sugarshack Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 5:39am
post #9 of 19

i do not know whay its bigger on top, but i grease the inside and the outside of the core and it slips right out of the cake after baking. i let the core cool and tap the cake out of the core. I have a tutorial here:



http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2008/09/i-love-it-to-core.html

-K8memphis Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 5:54am
post #10 of 19

Nice tutorial. Ok, I'll go upside down with it. I mean tube cake pan holes are volcanos not funnels. It sure couldn't work any worse than how I'm doing it though. icon_biggrin.gif

Thanks

BlakesCakes Posted 19 Jan 2009 , 1:12am
post #11 of 19

By placing the heating core upside down, the heat is building up inside during baking and it is blowing up--and over. icon_eek.gif It can't be used this way successfully. You never leave a hole in the center of a cake layer, unless it's a bundt cake.

You have to grease & flour the inside & outside of the core, put it into the center of the batter in the pan, fill the core about halfway with batter, and bake. Remove it and allow it to cool for a few minutes and then turn it out. When the cake is cool,turn it out and turn it rightside up again, put some icing around the inside of the hole, insert the cake plug, and then cut off the excess of the plug that stands above the cake top. If the cake needs to be leveled, you can do that with the whole plug in place and it and the cake will be cut at the same time.

HTH
Rae

-K8memphis Posted 19 Jan 2009 , 4:31am
post #12 of 19

Thanks

Hollysuann Posted 19 Jan 2009 , 4:24pm
post #13 of 19

I learn something new every time I come here! I was using the heating core upside down too! I always set it so it looked like a volcano. icon_redface.gif

-K8memphis Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 2:58pm
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollysuann

I learn something new every time I come here! I was using the heating core upside down too! I always set it so it looked like a volcano. icon_redface.gif




Me too. And I mean I saw that on tv once and I thought, dude she's got it upside down. I mean it doesn't always fall over.

I mean I often use the aluminum foil dealios all folded up like 3/4 inch by 5 inch and then one end is torn up the middle and each 'leg' is folded in opposing directions so the foil strip will stand up on the counter and I put that into the cake as a little heating core and random times those will bake up out of place too.

And I mean this particular cake I'm baking is a fully loaded three inches deep batter and so it bakes up to the top of the heating core so we'll see how it goes next time.

ps. Although I will bake the plug to keep the heating core in place, I do want the hole in the middle of the cake. Never say never huh. icon_biggrin.gif

lolobell Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 3:11pm
post #15 of 19

once again the newbie me has never even heard of a baking core. could have used this tip though before!
can it be used in other shape pans, such as a 14x10 rectangle or larger? do you need it for smaller rounds such as 8 or 6?

thanks.
sugarshack, your blog on baking cores was so great. wonderful photos and descriptions. you make everything seem so easy. BTW, your cakes are amazing.

-K8memphis Posted 20 Jan 2009 , 11:55pm
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by lolobell

once again the newbie me has never even heard of a baking core. could have used this tip though before!
can it be used in other shape pans, such as a 14x10 rectangle or larger? do you need it for smaller rounds such as 8 or 6?

thanks.
sugarshack, your blog on baking cores was so great. wonderful photos and descriptions. you make everything seem so easy. BTW, your cakes are amazing.




Yes you can use this principle to bake other shapes. This particular baking core might overpower a 6 inch cake but a rose nail is an option or the folded foil for smaller items. I use the foil for baking brownies too.

sugarshack Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 2:58am
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by lolobell

once again the newbie me has never even heard of a baking core. could have used this tip though before!
can it be used in other shape pans, such as a 14x10 rectangle or larger? do you need it for smaller rounds such as 8 or 6?

thanks.
sugarshack, your blog on baking cores was so great. wonderful photos and descriptions. you make everything seem so easy. BTW, your cakes are amazing.




Thank you! Glad it helped!

I use them for 8 and over.

sugarshack Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 2:58am
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by lolobell

once again the newbie me has never even heard of a baking core. could have used this tip though before!
can it be used in other shape pans, such as a 14x10 rectangle or larger? do you need it for smaller rounds such as 8 or 6?

thanks.
sugarshack, your blog on baking cores was so great. wonderful photos and descriptions. you make everything seem so easy. BTW, your cakes are amazing.


-K8memphis Posted 22 Jan 2009 , 3:15pm
post #19 of 19

So I baked another one yesterday and the core worked fine upside down with batter in it. But it was only a two inch tall cake. If it was one of the big momma cakes, I'm afraid the larger hole at the top where the cake will rise to will interfere with the crust somehow. I'll have to test that. It'll probably work though.

Honestly, I think the upside down part is a work around--the guys who designed the core meant for it to be used the other way, volcano style, but it doesn't work that way.

I don't know--it seems to be designed backwards of a tube pan--don't you think? In a tube pan the larger circumference is at the bottom like a volcano. But the heating core is best used as a funnel-backwards.

I'm actually thinking about using a foil wrapped coffee can or something like that for larger sizes (in other words making a custom sized tube pan)and placing something heavy in there. Something that can be removed easily, for baking >3 inch tall one layer pound cakes. We'll see.

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