How Do You Support 6" Tiers???

Decorating By MissRobin Updated 24 Jan 2009 , 11:29pm by indydebi

MissRobin Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 4:36pm
post #1 of 15

I was wondering for those who do six inch tiers, consisting of 3, 2" layers, how do you support these tiers individually???

14 replies
Suebee Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 4:42pm
post #2 of 15

Wow, never did one that tall before. Are all your layers 2"? Our wedding cakes are 3 1" layers each tier. We use wilton plastic cake boards and pillers and have also just used dowels and waxed cake boards between tiers and a long dowel down the center.

MissRobin Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 4:49pm
post #3 of 15

Yes, my layers are 2", so I have my bottom tier that is 8" and I know how i will support that one. But the middle and the top are 6" with 2" layers and wondering how to support so that it can be cut and served with ease and also not fall over!!!!!!

__Jamie__ Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 5:01pm
post #4 of 15

Dang! 6" tall tiers! That's gonna be one massive cake! Better get SPS to support that sucker!

HerBoudoir Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 5:15pm
post #5 of 15

I frequently make 6 inch and 8 inch tall cake, although I don't stack them. I also torte the layers so that the cake layers aren't ever more than about an inch thick (so lots of filling! mmmm), so we're looking at usually 6 layers of cake and the filling making up the extra height.

AfterI fill them and crumb coat them, I eyeball them to see if the layers are straight. I then put in bamboo skewers to hold everything together, then I chill them until the filling & crumb coat are set. This seems to give them the structure they need.

If after it's chilled the first time and it's not quite straight, I will use a serated knife to trim around the cake to compensate for any minor lean (yum...filled scraps).

If it's a particularly tall cake in relation to diameter (for example, a cake that has a diameter of only 6 inches but is approaching the 6 or 7 inch height) I do put in a central permanent thicker-than-the-bamboo dowel. If it's an 8 or 10 inch diameter with a 6 inch or so height, I usually don't bother.

Once the filling and CC is chilled, I take out the skewers and frost as normal, then chill again. The cold buttercream usually gives it the structure it needs (but I'm also a bit anal about cakes being chilled until about an hour before you serve).

Hope that helps.

kakeladi Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 11:02pm
post #6 of 15

A 6" round tier, even one that is 6" tall does not need much support. I usually use only 3 (Yes, I said 3) plastic drink straws - and those are not bubble straws. I have done this for years on wedding cakes and more and never had a problem. If you really feel 3 isnt enough, then add a 4th one.

__Jamie__ Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 11:07pm
post #7 of 15

Oh...geez, I misread the post, I thought she meant a 6 tiered cake...with 6" tall tiers. Whoops!

KoryAK Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 12:04am
post #8 of 15

Instead of one 6" tall cake I make 2 3" tall cakes supported as normal and then iced as one. Makes it sturdy and easier to serve.

kakeladi Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 2:05am
post #9 of 15

Oh yah, what KoryAK said! Forgot about that. I do the same. To make 3" tall cakes just torte (cut in 1/2) one layer and put one 1/2 on each of the other 2" tiers. Certainly will make it much easier to serve.

MissRobin Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 2:39pm
post #10 of 15

Thanks everyone!!

niccicola Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 3:32pm
post #11 of 15

how do you put a central dowel rod in a 3 tier cake of 6" tall tiers if they are all on a cardboard cake board base? Hammer it in and hope it makes a hole through the cardboard? Does it displace a lot of cake, if the cakes are already frosted and fondanted?

newmansmom2004 Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 3:46pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by niccicola

how do you put a central dowel rod in a 3 tier cake of 6" tall tiers if they are all on a cardboard cake board base? Hammer it in and hope it makes a hole through the cardboard? Does it displace a lot of cake, if the cakes are already frosted and fondanted?




I've seen them done that way. Just be sure to sharpen the dowel before hammering it in so it has a point and it'll go through the cardboard.

mrsclox Posted 17 Jan 2009 , 5:04am
post #13 of 15

I like to cut holes in the boards of my middle and top tiers, I cut my center dowel so it is about 3/4 the height of the total cake height, sharpen the top end, put it in the bottom layer and set the additional layers on to the dowel. Does that make sense? That way there's no hole in the top of the cake that you have to hide or patch up.

Suebee Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 8:25pm
post #14 of 15

Just use a pencil sharpener just for dowels and you have great points. Hammer through board right into the cake drum. Not going anywhere.

indydebi Posted 24 Jan 2009 , 11:29pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suebee

Just use a pencil sharpener just for dowels and you have great points. Hammer through board right into the cake drum. Not going anywhere.




Yep, this is exactly how it works. First time I tried it, I was scared to death ... but I kept my eyes open and everything!! It worked just like everyone says it will.

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