Needed: Wasc Experts - Please Reply

Decorating By mom2rascals Updated 30 Jan 2009 , 2:35am by NuttyNanny

mom2rascals Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 1:46am
post #1 of 48

O.K. I finally worked up the nerve to try making a WASC cake UNTIL I read that they are a nightmare to decorate! Is this true? Please let me hear some successful stories . . .

My son's 7th Birthday is coming up Feb. 1st and I was totally planning on making this one. Now I'm nervous! (I have only made one successful scratch cake and I think it was a fluke -- but I have read many tutorials in the meantime about scratch cakes) I planned on making a Lego Indiana Jones or something similar and covering a WASC with fondant . . . is this a mistake in the making/planning?

Also, I was always wondering, why does the wasc recipe call for all purpose flour and not cake/pastry flour?

47 replies
ranbel Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 1:56am
post #2 of 48

I just baked my first WASC tonight and it came out perfect. As for the icing, I haven't done that yet. But, it doesn't look any different than a regular box cake to me.

Don't know why it calls for regualar all purpose flour, but this is the BEST cake I have ever tasted....you won't be disappointed.

Maybe someone else has an answer to your quesitons, I'm interested to see.

kbak37 Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 1:56am
post #3 of 48

I can tell you all I have used is WASC....I am no expert, but I have had NO issues whatsoever except for one topsy turvey, but that was my fault. I love it! I have used it for all buttercream and all fondant. It holds up well for me. Try it and see how it does for you.

FullHouse Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:03am
post #4 of 48

Go ahead and make WASC, I've used it (or some variation of) many times with fondant and had great results. The recipe does call for all-purpose flour and that works fine, just make sure you sift. I also have a very tweaked version of it that I use for Red Velvet cakes (it's in my recipes on this site) and I've tried both all-purpose and cake flour for that, both turn out well, the cake flour just has a smoother texture. I haven't tried cake flour with WASC but it would just change the texture, just add 2T per cup when replacing cake flour for all purpose. (1 cup all-purp. = 1 cup + 2 tbs. cake flour).

IcedTea4Me2 Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:05am
post #5 of 48

I baked a WASC cake about a week ago and it came out great. Everyone liked the taste and I didn't notice anything with the decorating that was any different than any other cake. I would recommend it.


Lisa

mom2rascals Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:08am
post #6 of 48

O.K I feel much better now, my courage is back. Thank you ladies!

FullHouse Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:09am
post #7 of 48

I should also mention that I find WASC is sturdier than a plain mix, so it should actually hold up better under fondant. There is a recipe for 3D cake on here somewhere that is even stronger if you are doing a carved cake, but I've done simple carving with WASC (just carve when semi frozen).

flowermom Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:12am
post #8 of 48

I love WASC, I have made it using several variations. I use regular flour all the time and never have had a problem. It's is one of the most requested cake recipes I have. It also freezes very well ( just make sure you let it dry a bit before decorating it.) I have had not problems with buttercream or fondant, it's a sturdy cake with an awesome taste. I have heard that it used to be best with Duncan Hines, but most people don't use it now due to the fact they changed their formula.

Unless I am making a pure white cake I don't use 8 egg whites, instead I use 5 regular eggs. Never had a problem.

A couple of times I didn't have sour cream and subbed plain yogurt and still great results.

I usually bake it 24 hours in advance, it's always better a day later. Don't really know why, but I've read a lot of the bakers do the same thing.

There are a dozen or more WASC threads if you want to take some time to read up on it! Happy Baking! icon_biggrin.gif

mom2rascals Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:22am
post #9 of 48

If you plan on using it for a 3D cake & cover with fondant, is it advisable/not advisable to cover with plastic wrap right out of the oven to cool as one CCer does. Would this method make an already moist cake fall apart?

JodieF Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:25am
post #10 of 48

I can't imagine anyone having trouble icing WASC....well, I only make it with vanilla, so I guess it's a WVSC! icon_biggrin.gif It's very sturdy! I think the only people that have problems are the ones that underbake it. It really takes a long time to bake. I fill my pans pretty full but a 12 inch can take 90 minutes at 325.

Try it...you're going to love it!

Jodie

mom2rascals Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:30am
post #11 of 48

I'm not much of a white cake fan (but I LOVE almond flavoring!). I'm really hoping to fall in love with this recipe as many CCers have already done. Thanks for bringing back my confidence CC friends!

Wendoger Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:35am
post #12 of 48

....a nightmare to decorate? Really? Never heard that one....
One of my most popular cakes for sure....People love eating it and I love baking iticon_wink.gif

patswifey Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:39am
post #13 of 48

This is the only cake that I make (now) and I have found it to be sturdier than a box cake and it has less crumbs....I love it!!! thumbs_up.gif

mom2rascals Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 3:38am
post #14 of 48

I know this is a silly question, but how will I know when this cake is done? This is a very WHITE cake in color right? Does it brown slightly? or do I want to take it out before it browns.

Wendoger Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 3:52am
post #15 of 48

I use the old fashioned toothpick method...stick it in, when it comes out clean, it is doneicon_wink.gif

JanH Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 6:37am
post #16 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendoger

....a nightmare to decorate? Really? Never heard that one....
One of my most popular cakes for sure....People love eating it and I love baking iticon_wink.gif




Same here. thumbs_up.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2rascals

If you plan on using it for a 3D cake & cover with fondant, is it advisable/not advisable to cover with plastic wrap right out of the oven to cool as one CCer does. Would this method make an already moist cake fall apart?




Whether or not you choose to use this method is a personal choice because of possible associated food safety issues.

Here's a link to that thread so you can read and review all the info to make an informed decision:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-610054-.html

I can absolutely guarantee that made properly and not overbaked that the WASC cake is a great moist cake. icon_biggrin.gif

Rebecca Sutterby's WASC cake recipe w/variations:
http://tinyurl.com/2cu8s4

kakeladi's original (no fat added) recipe:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-588721-.html

Another chocolate WASC variation:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-587744-.html

Best results achieved by mixing properly.. When I make any of the WASC cake recipes, I sift all the dry ingredients together into a large bowl, and mix all the wet ingredients in a second larger bowl.

Then I add the dry to the wet and beat for 2 mins. using a hand mixer at medium speed.

If using a stand mixer, I would mix at the lowest speed for 2 mins. or less.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2rascals

I know this is a silly question, but how will I know when this cake is done? This is a very WHITE cake in color right? Does it brown slightly? or do I want to take it out before it browns.




For basic cake preparation and baking help, please refer to the Wilton cake preparation links (by pan depth) located in this super thread... (Gives batter requirements by pan size as well as recommended baking temps. and times.)

Everything you ever wanted to know about making your 1st tiered/stacked/layer cake:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

If you bake all your cakes at 325 degrees, simply add a bit more baking times to the cakes shown at 350 degrees in the charts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendoger

I use the old fashioned toothpick method...stick it in, when it comes out clean, it is doneicon_wink.gif




Also at this point; the cake aroma should be pronounced, the top wll be lightly browned, the cake will start pulling away from the sides of the pan slightly and the top will spring back when lightly touched.

HTH

ranbel Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 12:01pm
post #17 of 48

I used whole eggs in mine and it does have a very slight tint to it, so it's not snow whte. As for telling if it's done, I just use a toothpick. This does take a long time to bake. It does brown like any other cake.
I baked it in my 3in deep pan 8" round and it took abot 1hr 1/2....but, it is the best cake ever.

DegaDee Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 2:31pm
post #18 of 48

This is my 1st attempt at this cake...it's just a test to try the flavor. I started to mix the dry ingredients, and after I added the flour and sugar I noticed the flour was self-rising, not all purpose. How bad will this affect the recipe? Could I just omit the salt? Or do I just need to toss the flour/sugar I have in the bowl and start over? TIA

mom2rascals Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 3:50am
post #19 of 48

O.K. I just made my first WASC cake! (haven't tried it yet, but it smells tremendous!) We all had our turns licking the spoon, bowl & mixer blades. We all agreed that the batter is super yummy too.

I tried the "original WASC recipe" on an 8" pan plus 20 cupcakes. The cupcakes turned out fine, but I'm worried that the cake was either overdonne or underdone . . . not sure which. Maybe you can help me determine.

I started out the cake at 300 degrees for the first 20 mins, as recipe states. then raised the temp to 325 - recipe said for another 20 mins or until you "smell the cake". The top was starting to really turn brown at 35-38 mins. I used a toothpick, came out clean, took the cake out. the sides were just starting to pull away. I wrapped the cake in plastic wrap and by this time, the cake sunk in the middle! Please let me know what I have done wrong? Or any similar experiences you've had. Thanks

DegaDee Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 4:17am
post #20 of 48

How long did you mix it? I do mine for two minutes and no more.

mom2rascals Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 4:35am
post #21 of 48

Exactly 2 minutes, just like the recipe calls for.

shanasweets Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 4:44am
post #22 of 48

I always bake mine at 325, for aprox 40-50 min. Depends on round vs 9x13 pan. sinking usually means underdone. I have had tooth pick method fail me before. It should spring back some with gentle finger pushing. mine always puffs up a little, usually use flower nails in center of pan on my 9 x 13, sometimes even my 8 in. can use bake even strips to, this helps even the baking.
my quess is it is under done.

DegaDee Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 4:45am
post #23 of 48

I use the recipe that calls for baking temp at 325 start to finish. I've made this a few times over the last couple of weeks and it's been fine. It seemed like it took forever to bake, but one the toothpick came out clean I had no problems with falling.

mom2rascals Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 4:52am
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by DegaDee

I use the recipe that calls for baking temp at 325 start to finish. I've made this a few times over the last couple of weeks and it's been fine. It seemed like it took forever to bake, but one the toothpick came out clean I had no problems with falling.




How long do yours usually bake for?

kacurtis403 Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 4:54am
post #25 of 48

I always use this recipe and love it! I bake at 325 and for at least an hour. I always sift my cake mixes as I've read other people do but never sift the flour or sugar and never had any problems. You will come to love this recipe and all the different flavors you can substitute. thumbs_up.gif

mom2rascals Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 5:01am
post #26 of 48

this was one 8" round though, should it have taken closer to an hour? It WAS getting quite brown on top . . .

DegaDee Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 5:06am
post #27 of 48

It was at least 45/50 min and maybe even closer to an hour. I made a large sheet cake with a flower nail and then I did 2 8's and 2 6's. It sounds like it needed to cook a little longer.

kacurtis403 Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 5:08am
post #28 of 48

How deep is your pan? I usually use a 3in deep pan with a flour nail and bake even strips. I always cook for at least an hour and never had it over cook. Have you ever tested your oven? I picked up an inexpensive oven thermometer at Walmart and my oven was right on. Maybe that might be an issue.

DegaDee Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 5:14am
post #29 of 48

I wonder if the 300 for 20 minutes and then 325 for 20 minutes may have affected it. Which recipe called for the temp change?

mom2rascals Posted 29 Jan 2009 , 5:16am
post #30 of 48

I've always had issues with my oven ( but it keeps my in-laws away - so I've gotta make do). My oven burns everything, although it supposedly is callibrated correctly and working fine.

I'll try it for longer next time, it was really jiggly in the center just a few minutes before . . . but I just didn't want it to burn. I'm still learning how to cook with the crap oven that I have on hand. Lower temps and longer wait times, I guess!

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