Fresh Sliced Fruit On Wedding Cake...new To This

Decorating By shadowgypsie Updated 14 Jan 2009 , 3:54am by -K8memphis

shadowgypsie Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 5:09am
post #1 of 13

I have only ever worked with chocolate dipped strawberries so I'm in need of some help.

My bride sent me a picture of a cake she wants and it has all sorts of fruit on it that has been sliced, diced and balled.

What I'm not sure of is do I need to place something on the cake to catch the juices from the fruit. I have seen several beautiful cakes topped with the fresh sliced fruit but could not tell if there was anything under the fruit.

Any and all help would greatly be appreciated.

12 replies
-K8memphis Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 5:34am
post #2 of 13

Hmm sliced? All I can say is use a very sharp knife because it will cut down on seepage. And I would do the cutting on site.

Fruity thoughts for you.

evasmama Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 5:44am
post #3 of 13

The only cake I've ever made using fresh fruit on top was Tres Leches. It's SUPPOSED to be soggy, so the fruit works.

I concur with k8memphis- cut the fruit on site, and blot it like crazy before applying it to the cake. Your biggest concern will be seepage. The fruit will give off more juice as it warms up, so I'd start with room temperature fruit if possible. Some fruits would benefit from a colander rest to drain off. Others will oxidize and turn brown, like bananas and apples, so be aware of that. A toss with lemon juice will prevent that, but adds dreaded moisture.

A good compromise in using fresh fruit would be to have plenty of whole berries mixed in- raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, and even tiny Champagne grapes would all be very pretty without contributing moisture.

johnson6ofus Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 5:54am
post #4 of 13

I once thought about using one layer as "toast". Make the cake, keep one thin layer out, let it dry or toast it, then that layer is placed on top at the last minute with the layer or fruit. Kinda acts like a paper towel to soak up the juices. Any pros try something similiar or know if it would work?

shadowgypsie Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 2:00pm
post #5 of 13

thank you for your input as to using fresh fruit sliced. Any one else have any Ideas I would greatly appreciate them.

-K8memphis Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 2:43pm
post #6 of 13

Wait wait, I remembered something--you can brush them after you place them on the cake with apricot glaze. That will help but the inevitable will happen. If that's what they totally want I'd just advise them of it and charge appropriately for the last minute gourmet work.

See how much extra work that is though? The washing, the cutting, the arranging, getting the glaze warm somewhere, dabbing it on. Cutting fruit is messy. That could easily be a good two bucks more a serving depending on the amount required. I'm picturing it all over a tier cake.

But even if it's a small amount it's a lot of on site work. I mean figure if you wash it all before delivery--you gotta dry & re-package to carry over, keep cold. Lots of additional head ache in this.

Charge gourmet-ishly.
Charge designer cake-ish.

More fruity thoughts for you.

-K8memphis Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 2:49pm
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnson6ofus

I once thought about using one layer as "toast". Make the cake, keep one thin layer out, let it dry or toast it, then that layer is placed on top at the last minute with the layer or fruit. Kinda acts like a paper towel to soak up the juices. Any pros try something similiar or know if it would work?




Well you got icing there too. But that's an idea. So long as the cake doesn't flatten down or something when it gets wet/soggy. I guess we would have to test it huh. But how you gonna set the expectation for crisp cake. Oh well it would be fruit soaked cake--hmm

I don't know interesting idea though.

Or maybe something real spongy like an angel food layer?

-K8memphis Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 2:50pm
post #8 of 13

I would make the sure the border was substantial enough to make a dam to stem the tide there too.

brincess_b Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 3:43pm
post #9 of 13

some fruits get mushy after beeing washed, like stawberries. which i guess would possibly lead to bigger problems! i was told to clean them with a damp cloth - think how long that would take! maybe suggest to the bride that she would be better to use fruite that doesnt need cut!
xx

Imapirate Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 7:51pm
post #10 of 13

Lots and lots of apricot glaze. Heat the glaze and add a bit of water so it isn't too thick before you brush on. And it won't seep as much as you are imagining. Good Luck!

-K8memphis Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 11:54pm
post #11 of 13

Does the apricot glaze keep the fruit from browning? It should huh 'cause it's blocking it from the air. But depending on how much prep time you got--don't forget that one too. icon_biggrin.gif


kaching $ kaching $ kaching

Imapirate Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 3:52am
post #12 of 13

It does keep it from browning. It will keep the fruit "fresh" for several days.

-K8memphis Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 3:54am
post #13 of 13

Thank you, ImaP.

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