How Do I Stop A Fondant Blow-Out??

Decorating By janebrophy Updated 13 Jan 2009 , 9:20pm by CookiezNCupcakez

janebrophy Posted 12 Jan 2009 , 6:00pm
post #1 of 12

Anyone have any tips on what I did wrong?? I baked this cake in a terracotta pot, split it in 3, filled with buttercream. Then I crumb-coated it, and covered it in fondant. I did put it in the fridge afterwards. It was very stable, I'll post a pic. It was out for about 5 or 6 hours, then started to buckle. I know that's a long time, but not really if I'm delivering early in the morning right? I just want to know how to make this puppy rock solid! LOL!

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1300886.html


Thanks!!!

11 replies
PinkZiab Posted 12 Jan 2009 , 6:27pm
post #2 of 12

After filling and frosting/crumb-coating, let your cake settle for a few hours, or even overnight. I always let mine go overnight, and have never had a blowout (I do refrigerate--not sure if that makes a difference) Also, be careful not to overfill.

Rosie2 Posted 12 Jan 2009 , 7:15pm
post #3 of 12

Sorry, I must ask this question....you put a cake in the fridge after you covered with fondant? is that ok to do? I have a dilema with a cake that I covered with fondant last night. I left it out and I will finish it tonight although, is not due till tomorrow afternoon. Should I refrigerate overnight till tomorrow??

janebrophy Posted 12 Jan 2009 , 7:42pm
post #4 of 12

Honestly, I don't know if it's ok to refridgerate a fondant covered cake! I rarely work with it, but when I do, I tend to put it in the fridge. I haven't had any problem with sweating, but I wonder if it breaks down the fondant, resulting in a less stable cake??

I didn't wait in between the crumb coat, and covering it in fondant. Perhaps that was my problem!

Thanks for the replies!

Rosie2 Posted 12 Jan 2009 , 8:04pm
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by janebrophy

Honestly, I don't know if it's ok to refridgerate a fondant covered cake! I rarely work with it, but when I do, I tend to put it in the fridge. I haven't had any problem with sweating, but I wonder if it breaks down the fondant, resulting in a less stable cake??

I didn't wait in between the crumb coat, and covering it in fondant. Perhaps that was my problem!

Thanks for the replies!




Thank you for your response Jane...I've hjeard that you don't need to wait between crumb coat and fondant. I crumb coated and then put the fondant and it worked great. I don't know if this help, but sorry I'm a begginer icon_redface.gif
Good luck!

Chef_Stef Posted 12 Jan 2009 , 9:00pm
post #6 of 12

My fondant cakes get filled and crumb coated, then chilled till the crumb coat is firm.

Then I take them out and ice another thin layer and put them back in the fridge while I roll the fondant. Take the cake out and cover with fondant, then back in the fridge.

I always keep them in the fridge until delivery and they've always been fine. I use Satin Ice or home made fondant.

The only time I ever had a fondant blow out (or any other kind), is when I've used a standard BC (with powdered sugar/butter) instead of IMBC. I've never had blowouts with IMBC, so I try to never use standard BC, which I dislike all around anyway.

j-pal Posted 12 Jan 2009 , 9:23pm
post #7 of 12

I use fondant relatively often and never refridgerate at all. Not before, during or after. I have had "bubbles", but that's not from refrigerating or not refrigerating. It's because of air trapped under the fondant. There are a few ways this can happen: One is that during the covering process air can be trapped between your fondant and icing. Another way is that as your cake "settles", air that was trapped between your layers has made it's way outward. Be aware that even if you ice your cakes the day before to let them "settle", more settling can occur after you've covered it with fondant due to the weight of the fondant.

One responder mentioned that she always uses IMBC... one reason that this helps eliminate some pockets of air is that this type of icing does not crust and the fondant adheres to it all the way around, not leaving any room for trapped air. A crusting icing - unless covered with a glaze or a piping gel - has a tendency to not hold the fondant in place as well.

All that being said, sometimes it doesn't matter how hard you try and all the new tricks you learn, you still may get "bubbles" or "blow outs"! Your best bet is to be prepared, watch it carefully and be ready to pop the bubble and make repairs!! A hat pin, fondant smoother, and a bit of piping gel will help put everything back where it belongs. Good luck!

CookiezNCupcakez Posted 12 Jan 2009 , 11:41pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by janebrophy

Anyone have any tips on what I did wrong?? I baked this cake in a terracotta pot, split it in 3, filled with buttercream. Then I crumb-coated it, and covered it in fondant. I did put it in the fridge afterwards. It was very stable, I'll post a pic. It was out for about 5 or 6 hours, then started to buckle. I know that's a long time, but not really if I'm delivering early in the morning right? I just want to know how to make this puppy rock solid! LOL!

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1300886.html


Thanks!!!




A lil off topic.... but perhaps u can help icon_smile.gif I just posted re. a flower pot and how to get that shape, do I use an actual flower pot... is it food safe ie. lead free....I see you used a terracotta pot to bake in any help would be great thanks!

janebrophy Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 1:25pm
post #9 of 12

Thanks for the replies! The buttercream I use doesn't crust, but it isn't a meringue base.
I guess the key is practice, practice, practice! icon_smile.gif

Sugardivine - I think they are safe to bake in icon_confused.gif I googled baking cake in a terracotta pot, and found some threads here on CC as well. I soaked it for a few hours in hot soapy water, then I seasoned it with crisco and baked it for about 20 minutes (or longer), until the shortening looked gone, I did that about 4 times. (not the washing) I greased and floured the inside of the pot, and put a piece of tinfoil around the bottom. I pushed the tinfoil into the hole a little bit with my finger, from the bottom in, just to keep the batter from leaking out so much. Then I filled the pot, pretty full so that it would spill over, and then when it was baked I cut off the hump and had a nice level top. It did take a SUPER long time to bake, not sure of how long, I lost track. The first attempt I did looked baked, but when I took it out of the pot it was liquid inside....
Here's a pic
LL

CookiezNCupcakez Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 7:35pm
post #10 of 12

Thanks for the help I will give this a try... what temp should I bake in reg or lower?? I plan on doing mini pots so hopefully it wont need to bake too long..

I just love your pot it turned out so well, thanks again icon_biggrin.gif

janebrophy Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 8:37pm
post #11 of 12

I'm pretty sure I baked it at 350. I love the mini pots! There are a lot of cute pics on this site!

Post a pic here when you finish!!

CookiezNCupcakez Posted 13 Jan 2009 , 9:20pm
post #12 of 12

I willl do ... if I can ever upload icon_confused.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%