Baking With Kaluha Question

Decorating By kellertur Updated 11 Jan 2009 , 1:22pm by kellertur

kellertur Posted 11 Jan 2009 , 5:37am
post #1 of 6

I may have spelled that incorrectly (Kaluha?)

I'm making a cake and plan to infuse it with Kaluha by mixing it into the batter. Will the alcohol bake out? What I mean is, will someone get drunk off my cake? (I don't drink at all anymore, so I don't know...)
I've seen recipes for mixing in the liquor AFTER the cake is baked, in the filling, but I'm only after the depth of flavor not the alcohol.

ALSO: do you need a liquor license to use liquor in filling, etc that isn't heated? My guess would be yes, but again, I'm guessing...

Thanks ~ icon_smile.gif

5 replies
evasmama Posted 11 Jan 2009 , 5:50am
post #2 of 6

Most of the alcohol will probably bake out, but not 100%. It's highly unlikely anyone would get drunk or even tipsy, but be aware of any people with an allergy.

Liquor licenses are generally required only if you're selling actual bottles or individual drinks of alcoholic beverage. You can check with your area government.

modthyrth Posted 11 Jan 2009 , 6:02am
post #3 of 6

Vanilla has more alcohol content than Kahlua. Don't worry.

Even mixing a few tablespoons in a filling for flavor isn't going to get people drunk. Even making a nice go-go juice soak of half Kahlua half simple syrup isn't going to get anyone drunk. Even doing all three won't get anyone tispy. Not even close.

Allergies are another matter. If you're dealing with someone with a severe allergic reaction to alcohol, of course, let them know.

Liquor license, no. Only if you're selling actual liquor, not a confection that happens to use it as an ingredient.

Frankyola Posted 11 Jan 2009 , 8:10am
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by modthyrth

Vanilla has more alcohol content than Kahlua. Don't worry.

Even mixing a few tablespoons in a filling for flavor isn't going to get people drunk. Even making a nice go-go juice soak of half Kahlua half simple syrup isn't going to get anyone drunk. Even doing all three won't get anyone tispy. Not even close.

Allergies are another matter. If you're dealing with someone with a severe allergic reaction to alcohol, of course, let them know.

Liquor license, no. Only if you're selling actual liquor, not a confection that happens to use it as an ingredient.




Ditto what modthyrh said thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

Totally agree icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

ceshell Posted 11 Jan 2009 , 8:23am
post #5 of 6

Here's an interesting chart showing the rate of evaporation of alcohol in baked (and other) goods. http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/encyclopaedia!openframeset&frame=Right&Src=/edible.nsf/pages/alcohol!opendocument

I agree though, you need to take into consideration the total amount of alcohol you are using, and the amount that ends up in each served piece. Let's say you put a cup of Kahlua (that sounds like a lot to me??!) in a batter yielding 2-8" rounds ...8 oz liquor...even if you only cut the resultant cake into 8 slices then each guest only gets 1oz of liquor. Now, what's the proof of the liquor, and how much has evaporated? The final amt. consumed is going to be miniscule.

Even when it's uncooked in icing, or used in a simple syrup, there is only so much alcohol that can get into the cake (meaning, before the cake is soggy or before the icing liquifies) and only so much cake that will get eaten. If you're going to get a buzz just have a shot LOL! I often think that people who say they got "drunk off of the cake" are just using the alcohol as an excuse to act silly. Nothing wrong with that! I'm just sayin... icon_rolleyes.gif

kellertur Posted 11 Jan 2009 , 1:22pm
post #6 of 6

Thanks for the info. icon_smile.gif

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