Butter In Cake Batter?

Decorating By projectqueen Updated 6 Jan 2009 , 6:32pm by kokopuff

projectqueen Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 4:30pm
post #1 of 13

I have been having a lot of trouble lately with my yellow cakes sinking in the middle and having lots of heavy hard spots in the cake itself.

I have been using Duncan Hines Classic Yellow cake mix and adding an extender mix including butter, additional flour and sugar, etc. I have used it a lot before and never had trouble.

Now it seems that almost every cake has to be rebaked and I take the best layers of the two of them to make one cake. This is crazy and too much work/ingredients.

Does anyone have a great yellow cake recipe that includes butter? It can be a doctored mix or scratch, as long as it's dense.

Thanks.

12 replies
kakeladi Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 4:40pm
post #2 of 13

Lots of mix recipes call for melted butter. I rather doubt it's the butter unless you are not melting it before adding.
I almost never use DH mixes......
Could your oven not be functioning properly? Is it electric? You could have an element out.
Sorry, that's the best I can offer.

MandyE Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 4:43pm
post #3 of 13

I use a cake mix doctor recipe that is as follows (I think - I haven't made a whole lot of cakes lately).

1 white cake mix (I always use Betty Crocker)
1 stick butter melted
1 cup milk
3 eggs
2 tsp vanilla

Mix all ingredients and bake per directions on box (may have to adjust baking time, but I've found it's pretty close to box directions - at least in my oven).

I know it's a 'white' cake mix, but I definitely categorize as a 'yellow' or butter cake recipe. So good. Everyone loves this recipe and has no idea it's from a box.

projectqueen Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 4:51pm
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Lots of mix recipes call for melted butter. I rather doubt it's the butter unless you are not melting it before adding.
I almost never use DH mixes......
Could your oven not be functioning properly? Is it electric? You could have an element out.
Sorry, that's the best I can offer.




No, I don't melt the butter, just softened to room temp. But I always did it like that.

Doesn't seem to be the oven because the white cake I make and the chocolate cake seem to be okay. I thought maybe the hard spots were from too much fat, i.e., the butter. Could be something else I guess, but I haven't changed anything.

I love the taste of it when it comes out right, but I need to find something that's consistent. All this rebaking is killing me.

kakeladi Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 4:59pm
post #5 of 13

.......need to find something that's consistent. All this rebaking is killing me......
I sure understand that!!!!! icon_smile.gif
There is the possibility that there is something wrong w/the mix.
I've had that happen. When I called the co (BC) they denied any change or anyone else having reported problems but I talked to about 1/2 dz people and they also were having problems w/it. Never did figure out exactly what was causing problems back then (this was yrs ago.)

Win Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 5:18pm
post #6 of 13

I sometimes use a DH mix, but never had great results --especially when I was using it with butter. It always came out as you are describing. I don't have a lot of those issues when I use other mixes (I'm a Pillsbury gal myself.) I do find that no matter what I'm using, if I bake in a three inch pan, I have the undone centers unless I use a heating core --the flower nail doesn't get it done for me and that's taking all things into consideration including lower baking temps and longer baking times. I also sift my mixes before I use them. My oven is dead on calibration.

I have read of (in other forums) people becoming more and more disenchanted with DH mixes... some seem to describe much of what you are describing. I think DH denies any changes to their mixes as well.

I know that's not a lot of help... icon_sad.gif

projectqueen Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 5:28pm
post #7 of 13

Win, actually that IS a lot of help.

Maybe it is the DH mix. I have always been a DH gal and have always found the doctored DH mixes to be moist with a nice flavor. But these hard flavorless cakes are annoying.

I do bake in 3" high pans, but I do all my cakes in those pans with a flower nail and don't have a problem with anything but the yellow cake. Maybe I will try the same recipe with a Pillsbury cake mix and see what happens. I really like how the butter tastes in the cake.

I have never tried the heating core, do you like it?

icer101 Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 5:49pm
post #8 of 13

projectqueen, the recipe that mandyE gave you is delicous... i double it ... i triple it... never had a problem... i use any of the box mixes with this .. DH is a great box mix. it is just that we all use different mixes... and we don,t all like the same. that is ok... we are all different... just bake it on 325 degrees until you know it is done.... toothpick or small skewer pushed in middle to check for doneness... hth

projectqueen Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 6:11pm
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by icer101

projectqueen, the recipe that mandyE gave you is delicous... i double it ... i triple it... never had a problem... i use any of the box mixes with this .. DH is a great box mix. it is just that we all use different mixes... and we don,t all like the same. that is ok... we are all different... just bake it on 325 degrees until you know it is done.... toothpick or small skewer pushed in middle to check for doneness... hth




Have you made it in a 3" high pan?

Have you used yellow cake mix instead of white? I'm asking because I know white cake mix takes a lot less oil than yellow and just wondering how that works out with the ingredients posted.

I'll have to give it a try...

kokopuff Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 6:23pm
post #10 of 13

Projectqueen,I always use DH.I have 4 children and no time for scratch cakes!I have noticed lately as with every other product out there,they have cut back on the cake mix,it could be that you are adding to much of your extender ingredients.I haven't tried to extend mine so I wouldn't know how much you would need to cut back.You used to get 5 1/2 cups of batter to 1 box but now you get about 4 1/4-4 1/2.Hope this helps!

kokopuff Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 6:24pm
post #11 of 13

Projectqueen,I always use DH.I have 4 children and no time for scratch cakes!I have noticed lately as with every other product out there,they have cut back on the cake mix,it could be that you are adding to much of your extender ingredients.I haven't tried to extend mine so I wouldn't know how much you would need to cut back.You used to get 5 1/2 cups of batter to 1 box but now you get about 4 1/4-4 1/2.Hope this helps!

projectqueen Posted 5 Jan 2009 , 9:32pm
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuff

Projectqueen,I always use DH.I have 4 children and no time for scratch cakes!I have noticed lately as with every other product out there,they have cut back on the cake mix,it could be that you are adding to much of your extender ingredients.I haven't tried to extend mine so I wouldn't know how much you would need to cut back.You used to get 5 1/2 cups of batter to 1 box but now you get about 4 1/4-4 1/2.Hope this helps!




Thanks for that info, kokopuff. I didn't know it was cut back by so much, that's a big difference. Interesting that they haven't reduced the amount of oil or eggs on the box mix. So maybe I'm adding too much extender?

Odd, though that it only happens with the yellow cake. The other flavors are okay.

kokopuff Posted 6 Jan 2009 , 6:32pm
post #13 of 13

The best thing to do would be to measure out your cake mix,atleast once to figure out the difference.That is how I discovered the difference myself,when I noticed my pans weren't getting as full of batter as they should.I usually only use the white and the dark chocolate fudge,they have changed the ingredients on them slightly.I think the oil went from 1/2 cup to a 1/3 on the chocolate one and the water went down some but I can't remember exactly,I don't have 1 on hand at the moment or I would look.

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