Need Shiney Fondant

Decorating By cakesbydina Updated 7 Jan 2009 , 1:05am by peg91170

cakesbydina Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 12:01pm
post #1 of 26

does anyone know how to make fondant shiney. Not with a shimmer or luster dust powder but something that glisten's and looks wet. I am making a black purse cake and noticed on CC some of the purse's accents look wet to the touch, slick and shiney...any ideas?? icon_smile.gif

25 replies
sweet_teeth Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 12:16pm
post #2 of 26

You could load it with crisco... I know if you only put on a light amount it gets absorbed and the shine affect goes away, but once I overloaded it and the crisco-sheen never was absorbed.

Malakin Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 12:27pm
post #3 of 26

I believe the answer may be piping gel mixed with a little water and brushed on. I saw a post where someone else had tried this. I did it with a cake board to make water.

muddpuppy Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 12:46pm
post #4 of 26

I think you can spray it with a little vodka, or I sometimes just wipe it with a NEW vodka soaked sponge... it adds a tiny bit of shine..

FlourPots Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 12:51pm
post #5 of 26
banba Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 2:12pm
post #6 of 26

I use confectioners glaze!

jjkarm Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 4:14pm
post #7 of 26

Steam it. thumbs_up.gif

meancat Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 6:41pm
post #8 of 26

Yep, I steam all of mine, and they come out perfect! icon_biggrin.gif

cakebaker1957 Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 7:26pm
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjkarm

Steam it. thumbs_up.gif




Ok just curious , how do you steam fondant ? may need this info later on.
Thanks

cakesbydina Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 7:29pm
post #10 of 26

thanks flourpots. You nailed it!!!

FlourPots Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 7:43pm
post #11 of 26

You're welcome...glad to help.

jjkarm Posted 1 Jan 2009 , 2:47am
post #12 of 26

cakebaker1957-

I bought an inexpensive, hand held clothes steamer. It works great, plus you also have pretty good control over where the steam hits. The more you steam it the shiner it will get. Be careful though.....too much steam can make the fondant go soft and droopy. So be careful and steam it in layers, just until you get the effect you want. thumbs_up.gif

Frankyola Posted 1 Jan 2009 , 9:29am
post #13 of 26

I use crisco and it work really good for me.

say_it_with_cake Posted 1 Jan 2009 , 9:50am
post #14 of 26

You could always move to Queensland, Australia... it's 35 degrees (95F) here and very humid so all my fondant cakes are shiny at the moment! icon_razz.gif

mamacc Posted 1 Jan 2009 , 3:29pm
post #15 of 26

I use confectioner's glaze too....

brincess_b Posted 1 Jan 2009 , 9:18pm
post #16 of 26

if u want to use steam but dont have a steamer, just set a pan of water to the boil, and pass it through the steam a few times.
xx

cakebaker1957 Posted 2 Jan 2009 , 11:50am
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjkarm

cakebaker1957-

I bought an inexpensive, hand held clothes steamer. It works great, plus you also have pretty good control over where the steam hits. The more you steam it the shiner it will get. Be careful though.....too much steam can make the fondant go soft and droopy. So be careful and steam it in layers, just until you get the effect you want. thumbs_up.gif




Thank You this is good info will put in my saves (:

lalalady Posted 2 Jan 2009 , 4:41pm
post #18 of 26

Confectioners glaze should only be used on flowers and models that can be removed from the cake. It is a shelac based varnish that iis derived from beetles. Not something I would use on an entire cake.

lalalady Posted 2 Jan 2009 , 4:42pm
post #19 of 26

Confectioners glaze should only be used on flowers and models that can be removed from the cake. It is a shelac based varnish that iis derived from beetles. Not something I would use on an entire cake.

Sweet_Guys Posted 3 Jan 2009 , 12:25pm
post #20 of 26

Even in the humidity of Florida, we tend to lose the shine.

Someone else had mentioned to me about steaming the fondant. Do you just let the puffs of steam come out and hit the cake? Or do you run the iron over the fondant?

Sorry! Trying to visualize this and getting many interpretations in my head on how to do this.

Paul

Miffy Posted 3 Jan 2009 , 1:12pm
post #21 of 26

I normally just make a clear piping gel out of cornflour, sugar and lemon juice, then just brush it on. Vodka brushed on gives a bit of a shine too!

jjkarm Posted 4 Jan 2009 , 12:07pm
post #22 of 26

Sweet Guys---

Just let the puffs of steam hit the fondant. If you touch the cake with the iron, you'll end up with a real mess!

Sweet_Guys Posted 4 Jan 2009 , 5:31pm
post #23 of 26

Thanks, JJ----That's what I was thinking, but I wasn't sure.

Paul

jjkarm Posted 6 Jan 2009 , 11:31pm
post #24 of 26

No problem> thumbs_up.gif

eldag0615 Posted 7 Jan 2009 , 12:00am
post #25 of 26

Thank you for the info about the steamer, It never crossed my mind. I'm going to try it. I have another question, maybe some of you might know. I have seen in cake shows that after they attach a figure or something to a cake they spray something on it, and I have always wondered what it is, could it be something to make it shiny too or something to seal it? and if it is, what is it? I mean, the spray, what is it called?

peg91170 Posted 7 Jan 2009 , 1:05am
post #26 of 26

I always brush my cakes with vodka to make them shiny. Once it has dried, the alcohol has evaporated.

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