Filling In Cracks/tears On Fondant

Decorating By ZAKIA6 Updated 27 Dec 2008 , 3:18am by ZAKIA6

ZAKIA6 Posted 26 Dec 2008 , 6:07pm
post #1 of 10

Hi

I covered a cake yesterday and it has some cracks in the fondant.

I've seen on duff where they use royal to fill in cracks, but i recently took a class with elisa strauss where she mentioned a method where you take fondant mix it with liquid to form a paste and use it to fill in the cracks - but she didnt go into details due to time. Is anyone familiar with this method?

9 replies
tlreetz Posted 26 Dec 2008 , 6:19pm
post #2 of 10

If they are just small cracks, I simply dampen my finger and rub in a circular motion over the crack and it closes it up.

Bonnie151 Posted 26 Dec 2008 , 6:32pm
post #3 of 10

Ditto to tlreetz for small cracks. If I have hairline cracking (I get this quite a lot with green fondant) I keep rubbing the fondant and if that doesn't work, smooth some white fat over it.

What you are describing is creating a fondant gunge. I've never used it to hide cracks, but will often use it at the base of the cake if I want a perfectly smooth join between the cake and the tier below or the cake board, so I can imagine how you'd use it on cake cracks. You're basically just trying to make a paste from the fondant by mixing it with a bit of water until it's gunky but not too liquid and then you smooth it on.

trixe371 Posted 26 Dec 2008 , 8:44pm
post #4 of 10

I learned that technique in fondant class

indydebi Posted 26 Dec 2008 , 10:04pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie151

What you are describing is creating a fondant gunge. I've never used it to hide cracks, but will often use it at the base of the cake if I want a perfectly smooth join between the cake and the tier below or the cake board,... You're basically just trying to make a paste from the fondant by mixing it with a bit of water until it's gunky but not too liquid and then you smooth it on.




Trying to dumb it down for me icon_redface.gif .... is this similar to like putting grout or caulking between tiles in the bathroom?

Bonnie151 Posted 26 Dec 2008 , 10:23pm
post #6 of 10

Yep, exactly. If you see a photo of a tiered fondant cake without any border (e.g. balls, piping, ribbon etc) at the bottom of each tier but looking perfectly smooth, it's likely they've used gunge. You'll always have a bit of a rough edge or obvious join without some sort of border, so to hide it you can take some fondant, mix it with a bit of water and then smooth it along the bottom of the tier and the cake board/next tier. It gives you a nice, smooth, non-visible join.

indydebi Posted 26 Dec 2008 , 10:39pm
post #7 of 10

Thanks, Bonnie! I'm just starting to do fondant cakes and always wondered how you all got that bottom edge to look so perfect! Great tip!

Cakeonista Posted 26 Dec 2008 , 10:58pm
post #8 of 10

thanks everyone for this information, i usually get cracks in my fondant and never can get rid of them completely, crisco does not work for me. i cant wait to try this technique, sounds pretty easy! i was wondering i sometimes get seams on the bottome of my cake from too much fondant can i cover these up with this gunge also?
thanks everybody

zubia Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 2:27am
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie151

Yep, exactly. If you see a photo of a tiered fondant cake without any border (e.g. balls, piping, ribbon etc) at the bottom of each tier but looking perfectly smooth, it's likely they've used gunge. You'll always have a bit of a rough edge or obvious join without some sort of border, so to hide it you can take some fondant, mix it with a bit of water and then smooth it along the bottom of the tier and the cake board/next tier. It gives you a nice, smooth, non-visible join.




Thank you so much ,this is very valuble information.

ZAKIA6 Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 3:18am
post #10 of 10

thanks so much for the replies. i wasnt able to use this method on a cake i did today but im sure ill be needing it soon.

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