Baking Tips For A 16" Square Cake...

Decorating By christinasconfections Updated 2 Jan 2009 , 9:11pm by stampinron

christinasconfections Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 1:39pm
post #1 of 11

Hello all! I am starting to prepare for a wedding cake I have due 2 days after christmas (I know, what was I thinking!) and it is a carrot cake with cream cheese frosting (I'm going to be shredding 10 lbs. of carrots in about 10 minutes). It is a three tier square cake with tiers being 16", 12" and 8". I'm not concerned with the two smaller cakes but I've never baked a 16" and the pan fits my oven wall to wall. I don't have a heating core and I'm afraid that when it bakes it will dry around the outer part in order to bake the center. I will be baking at 325 degrees but I didn't know if anyone out there who has baked a larger cake has any tips or comments so that I don't waste my time or money. I also am freezing the cakes so any tips so my large cake doesn't crack in the middle would be helpful too...thanks!

10 replies
debydll Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 1:56pm
post #2 of 11

Hi! If you don´t have a heating core, you may use a "nail" (think this is the name of the thing that you use to make sugar flowers) , in the middle or the center of your cake.
This tip is from CC en español.I hope that my english not confused you more !! icon_redface.gif
Merry Christmas & a happy new year!!

ranbel Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 2:03pm
post #3 of 11

I myself have never baked larger than a 14. I always use heating cores on anything larger than a 10in, I highly recommend it. I use the flower nail as heating cores. For one that large, I would use at least 3 nails myself, if not 4. As long as your pan does not touch the sides of the oven, you will be fine. I bake all my cakes at 325, regardless of their size and they come out perfectly.

I would for sure put support under that cake in the freezer. Wrap your cake in saran wrap then foil and place it on a cake board to go into the freezer. I would be afraid to handle a cake that large without breaking it as well.

I hope this helps you and I'm sure their are many cc'ers that have done cakes that large...they will help you.

pinkbox Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 2:13pm
post #4 of 11

I use the Wilton flower nails as my "heating core"... place them in the 4 corner areas more toward the center and one in the center. It will bake it evenly throughout.

I put the flower nails down then parchement over them. Then bake

christinasconfections Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 2:42pm
post #5 of 11

When you say put the flower nail in, do you mean placing the nail up side down then pouring the batter over it so the end of the nail is only showing? I want to make sure I get this right because I have my 3 kids 6 and under here and I'm 5 months pregnant so my time and energy are limited icon_smile.gif

staceyboots Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 2:47pm
post #6 of 11

this technique may be a bit more time-consuming, but some people (although i've never done it) would use four (4) 8" square pans...arrange them side-by-side to get your 16" square tier

bethola Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 2:54pm
post #7 of 11

I learned the HARD WAY! My suggestion: After your cake is baked, turn it out on a board and let it cool COMPLETELY. Wrap in Saran Wrap and put in the frig for at least 4 hours and THEN double wrap in Saran and then foil. Then place in frig with good support.

When you are ready to place it on the actual cake board do it while the cake is frozen, otherwise, you are flirting with disaster. Well, at least I was flirting with disaster!

GOOD LUCK! Post a Pic!

Beth in KY

Edited to add: OOPS! I meant to say Then place in the FREEZER! Sorry!
It's the holidays you know!

ranbel Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 3:12pm
post #8 of 11

Yes, place the nails upside down so the pointed part is sticking up. Make sure you spray it or coat it so it comes out easy...

Good luck

CakeMakar Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 3:12pm
post #9 of 11

It's all about support. Go to the cake store and buy big enough cardboard cake boards. Use them to transfer your cakes around, and to put them on the cake. One layer per board (at least until they're completely cool & level!) Sometimes I get cocky and think I'm okay and slide 1/2 off to the cake, and there it goes. Big ol' crack in the middle. Don't try to flip gigantic layers either, unless your recipe is super solid & dense.
Take your time (though there's not much left!) and your cakes will be fine.

Loucinda Posted 24 Dec 2008 , 3:44pm
post #10 of 11

I use only one "nail" in the center of the pan (works fine for me) make sure you grease it before using it.

I also only use 1/2" plywood for such a big cake.,,,heavy, yep, but that cake isn't going to give with that support.

If your oven has any "hot" spots you may want to turn the pan a couple of times while baking. I also only bake at 325.

I was terrified the first time I made one too, it turned out great! You'll do fine.

stampinron Posted 2 Jan 2009 , 9:11pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bethola

I learned the HARD WAY! My suggestion: After your cake is baked, turn it out on a board and let it cool COMPLETELY. Wrap in Saran Wrap and put in the frig for at least 4 hours and THEN double wrap in Saran and then foil. Then place in frig with good support.

When you are ready to place it on the actual cake board do it while the cake is frozen, otherwise, you are flirting with disaster. Well, at least I was flirting with disaster!

GOOD LUCK! Post a Pic!

Beth in KY

Edited to add: OOPS! I meant to say Then place in the FREEZER! Sorry!




Ditto.

I did a 16" once. It too filled my oven. Used the flower nail, bake even strips, 325. But make sure your cake layers are fully supported or frozen while assembling the layers or they will crack on you.

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