Rolling Fondant With Crisco Vs. Powdered Sugar

Decorating By cakesbykitty Updated 27 Dec 2008 , 4:28pm by katwomen1up

cakesbykitty Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 6:34pm
post #1 of 25

i learned to roll it out with crisco, yet all the cake shows show them using powdered sugar. anyone know which is better, and if you use powdered sugar how do you get the white residue off the final product?

24 replies
tonedna Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 6:43pm
post #2 of 25

I use both depending on color, how sticky the fondant is and what I am doing..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

tracey1970 Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 7:07pm
post #3 of 25

I always use just a VERY thin layer of shortening, and have never used anything but. I have had success with this myself.

ape74 Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 7:20pm
post #4 of 25

What about cornstarch? Somone told me cornstarch is better than PS so that the consistency of the fondant would not be changed. They actually said to use both cornstarch and crisco as I'm rolling it depending on how sticky or dry it is.

cakesbykitty Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 7:24pm
post #5 of 25

so if you use them how do you get the powdered sugar or corn starch residue off?

stephaniescakenj Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 7:25pm
post #6 of 25

I used to have the worst time rolling out fondant with crisco and powder sugar. So much so that I very rarely used fondant except for small accents, i was using strictly buttercream. Recently I started using Cornstarch though and I've had much better success with it. I've actually covered my last three cakes in fondant and didn't want to hang myself afterwards! icon_biggrin.gif The only trouble is, it seems to dry out much faster. Whenever I have that problem, I rub some crisco on my hands and then rework the fondant until its soft again.

ape74 Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 7:28pm
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephaniescakenj

I used to have the worst time rolling out fondant with crisco and powder sugar. So much so that I very rarely used fondant except for small accents, i was using strictly buttercream. Recently I started using Cornstarch though and I've had much better success with it. I've actually covered my last three cakes in fondant and didn't want to hang myself afterwards! icon_biggrin.gif The only trouble is, it seems to dry out much faster. Whenever I have that problem, I rub some crisco on my hands and then rework the fondant until its soft again.





That is exactly how I was told to do it Stephaniecakenj!

panchanewjersey Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 7:32pm
post #8 of 25

I use both. But I really prefer cornstarch over powdered sugar. I use a little crisco but so it's nice and pliable but when rolling out I use the cornstarch.

seskenn Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 7:35pm
post #9 of 25

I'm pretty new to using fondant, and at first tried both cornstarch and/or powdered sugar. I never could get all of the dust off my cakes afterwards, without going over everything with a wet paintbrush. For my last two cakes I've used crisco and loved it. It doesn't stick to my counters at all, although it does get a little stretchy if I use too much. Doesn't dry out while I'm working with it, and I was finally able to cover a square cake without any seaming.

kandu001 Posted 21 Dec 2008 , 1:48am
post #10 of 25

I use cornstarch for the most part. Sometimes I use a combo w/powdered sugar and cornstarch. You just wipe off the residue when you're done.

cathie_shinnick Posted 21 Dec 2008 , 2:10am
post #11 of 25

I nw always use cornstarh. i you have sone resdue after yu ovr the cake , Brust wih a soft arge brush, or use vodka or lemon extract and lightl bruh wih that. works every time

RobzC8kz Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 10:44pm
post #12 of 25

I use both now! Wendylala taught me how to use crisco. I mainly use PS for the lightly colored fondant because it's easier to dust the remaining PS off without leaving residue. For darker colors, like black, brown, red, etc. I use crisco so that you don't get any residue.

Like anything else with fondant, the more you work it, the easier it gets!!!

leah_s Posted 23 Dec 2008 , 2:30am
post #13 of 25

In culinary school they taught us to use corstarch. In the real world I've learned how much better a film of veg shortening works.

plbennett_8 Posted 23 Dec 2008 , 5:53am
post #14 of 25

For residue on fondant, get a misting bottle and use high proof vodka, or Everclear with a high evaporation rate and lightly spray on the cake. It will take off any powered sugar or cornstarch. No you won't get drunk...lol icon_smile.gif

cakesbykitty Posted 23 Dec 2008 , 6:06pm
post #15 of 25

Brilliant! i new there was a trick..

bashini Posted 24 Dec 2008 , 12:50am
post #16 of 25

I knead my fondant with crisco and roll out it on cornflour. Not a lot though!

khufstetler Posted 25 Dec 2008 , 5:33am
post #17 of 25

I am an AVID supporter of corn starch!!!!

I use NOTHING else when rolling out MMF - unless it needs to "thicken" or "dry" up a bit, then I use powdered sugar.

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khufstetler Posted 25 Dec 2008 , 5:34am
post #18 of 25

I am an AVID supporter of corn starch!!!!

I use NOTHING else when rolling out MMF - unless it needs to "thicken" or "dry" up a bit, then I use powdered sugar.

icon_wink.gif

CookiezNCupcakez Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 5:59am
post #19 of 25

I make my own MMF and I have gotten away with using nothing to prevent sticking as I roll it out on a board coverd w/ contact paper !

katwomen1up Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 3:42pm
post #20 of 25

Corn starch will dry it out, I use powdered sugar have never used crisco. I make my own though Wilton recipe so it may depend on the brand you use. It will also depend on the texture of what you're using.

Kat

cakesbykitty Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 3:45pm
post #21 of 25

how do you make your own fondant? tried MMF once, too dry.

mommakristin Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 3:54pm
post #22 of 25

I use shortening since I also use the Ateco mat to roll out my fondant. Some time ago I purchased the DVDs from Sugarshack and in the video she uses a thin layer of shortening on the mat before she rolls out her fondant. If it's good for Sharon then it's good for me is my motto!!!

terrylee Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 4:06pm
post #23 of 25

I use cornstarch for the most part too. Use a pastry brush to dust off the excess... If I do chocolate fondant I will use a quick spray of pam on the counter ...a little goes a long way. Haven't noticed and difference in taste and it gives the chocolate a great sheen.

MissBaritone Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 4:26pm
post #24 of 25

The only problem with constarch (cornflour) is if you are making a British style cake where you put fondant on over marzipan. Cornflour can react with marzipan and cause it to ferment, so in this case I would stick to icing sugar. I get rid of as much of the excess as I can by brushing with a small pastry brush. I leave it in a cardboard box overnight and by the next day the sugar residue has vanished.

katwomen1up Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 4:28pm
post #25 of 25

Wilton Recipe for single recipe not sure of the size this covers but I normally double this for a double layer 10'.

1 pkg of knox geliton (disolve this first in the bottom of a double boiler with 1/4 cup of water.)
After this is disolved and thick place on top of low heat until it disolves.
Add 1/2 cup of glucose, mix well. (warm this up in the microwave it's easier to get out of the container)
2T of crisco, let disolve until pea size, remove from heat and let disolve completely.
1T of gliceryn
1 1/2 tsp of flavoring (any flavor)
can add coloring at this time (optional) if no specific color is needed.
Let cool to luke warm
In a large bowl add 2 pounds of powdered sugar, make a well leaving PS at the bottom of the well too.
Pour in the glucose mixture and slowly mix into the powdered sugar, pull in sugar a little at a time. You will not use all of this sugar. When you can no longer mix with a wooden spoon put on a pair of gloves and mix by hand until it's a bit tacky to the touch. Strain the remaining sugar and remove the lumps by putting it thru a screen, or use new. Use the remainder of the sugar to flour your board and fondant. Roll out until you have it 1/4 in thick, making sure you flip it often as you roll it so it doesn't stick to your board. Always put powdered sugar on your board so it doesn't stick. If you get the fondand too dry you can always knead a little bit of glucose back it. I roll fondant out on masonite boards, one to roll on and the other gets placed on top when I'm ready to flip it after it's dusted with PS. If this is confusing pm me and I'll try to explain it better. When it is 1/4 inch thick you want to take your hand (remove any rings) and and rub the fondant until smooth with the palm of your hand. This will removel all traces of PS too.
For chocolate fondant use 1/2 cup of sifted cocoa and remove one cup of powdered sugar. The cocoa will dry it out more so be careful. Also when dusting and rolling the fondant you want to use a mixture of cocoa and powdered sugar so you can wipe down the access and it won't show.

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