Thickness Of Crumb Coat Under Fondant?

Decorating By Someonesmommy Updated 15 Jan 2009 , 12:38am by sweettreats36

Someonesmommy Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 9:09am
post #1 of 14

How thick should the crumbcoat be before you cover the cake with fondant?

Im a fondant newbie and am trying to get my cakes to look and taste as good as possible.

Thanks in advance!

13 replies
bashini Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 10:51am
post #2 of 14

Hi, it shouldn't be very thick. I put mine just to cover the cake. A bit more than a crumcoat. And make sure the fondant is not too thin.

Hope that make sence.

montanabaker Posted 20 Dec 2008 , 5:47pm
post #3 of 14

yeah, just enough for stickiness and smooth enough so that when you smooth fondant you aren't fighting with crumbs underneath.

kimberlina25 Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 7:03am
post #4 of 14

if your crumb coat is too thick, it'll make your fondant lumpy. so just a thin layer so your fondant will stick!

HTH!

sparklepopz Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 7:03pm
post #5 of 14

I (and many others here) put a normal application of buttercream under fondant. If you chill your buttercream-iced cake in the freezer for about 10 minutes before applying fondant, you will be able to really work the fondant on and achieve a super-smooth finish. This also allows you to skip applying piping gel, or spritzing water, or using whatever method you use to make your buttercream sticky for the fondant to adhere to it.

Many people do not like fondant (taste, texture, whatever) so having a regular thickness of BC under the fondant allows the non-fondant-eaters to have a normal piece of cake. icon_smile.gif

sugarshack Posted 22 Dec 2008 , 9:58pm
post #6 of 14

I trim my cake sides
crumbcoat
flash freeze 7 minutes
then cover with fondant a tad less than 1/4 inch thick

SaraClassic Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 10:11pm
post #7 of 14

Thanks Sharon, Im having lumpy fondant issues icon_sad.gif I think I started thinning my fondant too much maybe. I havent trimmed on the sides, if they look even anyone do that no matter what, or just the top?

FromScratch Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 10:17pm
post #8 of 14

I put a full layer of BC under my fondant too. Ice the cake the way you normally would.. chill the cake.. apply the fondant.

I like giving people a full layer of BC because not everyone likes fondant and then you can eat the cake without the fondant and still have icing. icon_smile.gif

sugarshack Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 11:41pm
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraClassic

Thanks Sharon, Im having lumpy fondant issues icon_sad.gif I think I started thinning my fondant too much maybe. I havent trimmed on the sides, if they look even anyone do that no matter what, or just the top?





if they are perfectly straight with no bulges at all then go for it but mine never are, lol

skeet1zp Posted 14 Jan 2009 , 11:53pm
post #10 of 14

I use a normal layer of buttercream underneath my fondant. I refrigerate my cake and then cover it with fondant. I have never had any problems with lumps or bumps underneath. That way, people who do not like fondant ( I use SI fondant, so I have not had anyone complain about the taste), can peel it off and eat the cake with the buttercream.

sayhellojana Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 12:00am
post #11 of 14

I put way more frosting on fondant cakes than buttercream because then the fondant is peeled off, it takes some icing with it. Normally I like between 1/4-1/2 in of frosting on a buttercream cake. Fondant cakes get even more than that. I refridgerate them so the icing is sturdy and I can get a decently smooth cake

KoryAK Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 12:01am
post #12 of 14

regular layer here

adunfag Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 12:22am
post #13 of 14

I usually apply a regular layer also, for the same reasons stated above.

sweettreats36 Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 12:38am
post #14 of 14

I have not covered a acake in fondant yet, but I will try using more icing and then flash freeze and then fondant. I don't know anyone yet who likes fondant.

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