Honest Opinions--First Paid Cake

Decorating By Genny_yummies Updated 19 Dec 2008 , 6:35pm by Fairytale

Genny_yummies Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 6:23pm
post #1 of 22

So how did I do?
This was for my sister's daughter's baptism.
It was my regular yellow cake, but this time it had buttercream filling making it 4+" tall. Bottom is 10" and top is 6". She gave me $50 for it. Everyone was raving about how good it was.
Please give it to me, I can take it.
It was all buttercream with MMF flowers.
LL

21 replies
cakesdivine Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 6:26pm
post #2 of 22

Good Job! I am sure you sister & your niece loved it!

gr8cakemaker Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 6:28pm
post #3 of 22

I think you did an excellent job! I love the topper...and it looks yummy! Congratulations on your first sold cake!

twistedsplinters Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 6:40pm
post #4 of 22

Congratulations! you did an excellent job!

sari66 Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 6:53pm
post #5 of 22

Excellent job icon_smile.gif

cupcakemkr Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 6:57pm
post #6 of 22

Very pretty, I think you were underpaid...good thing it was for you sister/niece icon_smile.gif

Wing-Ding Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 6:57pm
post #7 of 22

Very good job!!! Worth every penny and more!

ericablondegirl Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 7:05pm
post #8 of 22

I love your cake...you did an amazing job...worth way more than $50, but I know how the family discount works. Keep posting your future cakes, you are very talented.

sweet_teeth Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 7:11pm
post #9 of 22

I opened this thread ready to give constructive critique and so I looked at the cake through a decorators eye, and not as a person looking to give praise or a confidence boost. looked for flaws in the buttercream, the dreaded bulge, or other things us decorators dread..

Turns out I didn't find any of it. You did amazing.. your cake is beautiful. This is a very honest opinion. I also believe you were underpaid. Do not cut yourself short icon_smile.gif

Great great great great job!

FlourPots Posted 18 Dec 2008 , 8:00pm
post #10 of 22

I think it looks awesome, and I really, really like how you reversed the colors.

Genny_yummies Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 12:23am
post #11 of 22

WOW!
I guess every time I looked at it, I only saw flaws. Thanks again for the compliments.
Everyone at the dinner was giving me compliments too, saying how I should open up my business soon, but I really thought they were just being nice.
Thanks for being honest!
Any thoughts on what you would have charged non-family members for this cake?

kakeladi Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 12:33am
post #12 of 22

Well doneicon_smile.gif Excellent in all ways. (Well I can't taste it but I'm sure it was great).
As for pricing a 10x4 serves 35-39; a 6x4 serves 12-16
I'd say about $2.50-3 per slice minimum.

-K8memphis Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 12:41am
post #13 of 22

It's a pretty cake, well done--I like the contrast between the tiers.

For a future cake of 53 servings (39 for the 10" and 14 for the 6") at the very very very rock bottom least $2 per, to be respectable.
So $106. min. uh. mum. icon_biggrin.gif

I mean you're currently at a buck a serving. I would guess you didn't even cover your expenses at that but I mean on one hand I understand it's for family but still.

Maybe add up your ingredients & see how much it was.
<insert covering my eyes smilie face>

Great job.

Charge more.

Jayde Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 12:51am
post #14 of 22

I will agree with the others that you need to charge more. Honestly, I was the same way when I started decorating. I charged like $40 for a cake to serve like 30 people. I didnt realize that I wasnt even covering MY costs!

Add in everything, water costs money, so does electricity, so does the soap that you are using to clean your dishes. I just bumped my prices up to $3.50 a serving which is still way cheap compared to some.

You are worth it, and honestly for you first cake it looks really good. Some people's first cake pictures are hidden in the deepest darkest part of the album, cause they are too afraid to show them. They are afraid they will scare the customers away, mine included. You will improve with every cake that you make.

montanabaker Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 12:54am
post #15 of 22

Well I think that is a very cute cake. Good job!

Lenore Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 1:22am
post #16 of 22

Great job. You should be very proud. How did you get that wavy line so perfect around the side of the cake?

Fairytale Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 1:27am
post #17 of 22

You asked for honest feedback so here goes. You might try to get the icing just a little thicker on the sides. You shouldn't be able to see were the layers meet. Put on your first crumb coat, let the cake sit in the fridge for 15-30 minutes, then put on the top coat. To get it real smooth, I always take a hot knife and go over it once again.

Your colors came out great. You need to practice on getting the trim a little more even, but that just comes with practice.

Best wishes.

JaLa90016 Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 1:36am
post #18 of 22

You definetly did an awesome job!!! I love the contrasting colors and your topper. This cake is WORTH more than $50. Again, congratulations on doing a wonderful job.

Merry Christmas,
Jala

Susie53 Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 2:01am
post #19 of 22

Very pretty cake, I love the colors!

Genny_yummies Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 3:36pm
post #20 of 22

Thanks again everyone.
Fairytale: That was one thing I noticed and so did Dh, but no one else seemed to notice, I will be getting an icing tip to use for the future. Somehow, it only seems to happen when I do very light colored icing, don't know why.
Also, does your icing change a little when using a hot spatula? I used to do the hot spatula, but it seemed to kinda melt the icing on some spots making the colors darker on some areas, so I stoped using that method and just use the VIVA paper towel, or the other one with the foam roller (I forgot the name of that one, maybe Melvira?)
Anyway, again thanks for your honest opinions. I just lost 2 orders. One, well, that was bad on the customer's part, she called on a Friday for a cake she needed the next day---and the other, well, family again, she actually thought I would make her a cake for free---Well!--It's almost Christmas and my budget is not going to go for that---Oh well!-
Hopefully I'll be getting in orders soon---I mean, DH already placed an order for a cake for us for X-mas--

-K8memphis Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 4:48pm
post #21 of 22

Here's an idea for you to consider. I have started to shave the sides of my cakes before crumbcoating or icing. The icing of course covers a multitude of imperfections but if the cake is already very very smooth, it is much easier to get the icing to cover efficiently without a ton of diddling with it.

By shave I mean just barely trim the sides witha knife so everything is ever steven. Makes a nice difference. Worth the effort to me.

Just an idea--you mentioned dark spots--this would fix that.

Fairytale Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 6:35pm
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

Here's an idea for you to consider. I have started to shave the sides of my cakes before crumbcoating or icing. The icing of course covers a multitude of imperfections but if the cake is already very very smooth, it is much easier to get the icing to cover efficiently without a ton of diddling with it.

By shave I mean just barely trim the sides witha knife so everything is ever steven. Makes a nice difference. Worth the effort to me.

Just an idea--you mentioned dark spots--this would fix that.




I agree. I level both the sides and top of my cakes. I actually uses a real level to check that everything is even. This should solve that problem. As for the hot knife, I've not had it change the color of my icing but I usually work in very light colors. Also, it might depend on what type of icing your using. I use only butter, vanilla, powdered sugar and heavy cream. No crisco, creamers, etc. However, if your having that problem, definitely say away from that technique.

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