The Flower Nail Method Tutorial

Decorating By rezzygirl Updated 6 Aug 2009 , 3:59am by PJ37

rezzygirl Posted 15 Dec 2008 , 10:45pm
post #1 of 31

Just a quick demo to show what the flower nail method looks like. This method is an alternative to using "bake even strips" for a cake that requires less to no leveling after baking.
Hope this is helpful.

______________________________
-Rezzy
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30 replies
sayhellojana Posted 15 Dec 2008 , 10:57pm
post #2 of 31

Thanks. Awesome pictorial. I still love my leveler though icon_smile.gif

bobwonderbuns Posted 15 Dec 2008 , 10:58pm
post #3 of 31

Just the way I do it!! Way to go!! icon_biggrin.gif

Daisys_Cakes Posted 15 Dec 2008 , 11:06pm
post #4 of 31

Wow, that's pretty cool! I will have to try it sometime!

Thanks!

__Jamie__ Posted 15 Dec 2008 , 11:11pm
post #5 of 31

Great! Thank you for this! I will be needing to employ this method soon, and it's great to see it like this!

Monkess Posted 16 Dec 2008 , 2:49am
post #6 of 31

Very dedicated and sweet of you to take the time to do this...

lujauna Posted 16 Dec 2008 , 3:07am
post #7 of 31

Save

newmansmom2004 Posted 16 Dec 2008 , 3:17am
post #8 of 31

I've never used this method but I think I'll try it. If it keeps me from taking off the top 1/4 of my cake I'm all for it.

Thanks for the great info!

imartsy Posted 16 Dec 2008 , 3:20am
post #9 of 31

Great pictures! It took me awhile to figure out this method when I was doing a full sheet cake the first time. I had to put 3 nails in there just to cook it all the way through. Thanks for posting.

rezzygirl Posted 16 Dec 2008 , 3:40am
post #10 of 31

Thank you! I've been wanting to post this for months and finally got a chance. Glad to be of help!.

Quote:
Originally Posted by imartsy

Great pictures! It took me awhile to figure out this method when I was doing a full sheet cake the first time. I had to put 3 nails in there just to cook it all the way through. Thanks for posting.




I'm glad you mentioned that!! I use two flower nails for 1/2 sheetcakes: one on each side, kinda centered,
and three for full sheetcakes: one in the middle, then one on each side of that. They cook evenly and no holes to fill back up like with baking cores. thumbs_up.gif

jen1977 Posted 16 Dec 2008 , 1:29pm
post #11 of 31

Hmm...I've never put them i nafter putting in the cake batter. I always assumed it would stick doing it that way! I put in hte nail, and then try to get the batter around it! Good to know I can do it afterward! Thanks!

BakingJeannie Posted 16 Dec 2008 , 3:40pm
post #12 of 31

Thanks for posting that. I usually put the nail in my sheet cakes, and over the weekend I used it on a 10x3 square pan and it was level. I use the nail because I wanted the cake to bake faster, but realize now that it made it even too.

Cheers!

Homemade-Goodies Posted 24 Dec 2008 , 11:48am
post #13 of 31

Wow...definitely going to try this next cake!! Thanks for the time & effort to share your pictorial!!

FlourPots Posted 25 Dec 2008 , 1:26am
post #14 of 31

I also will be needing to do this soon (for the first time). Thanks so much for the pictures.

tracey1970 Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 2:33am
post #15 of 31

I tend to use both the nail(s) and the strips, just because that seems to work for me.

Frankyola Posted 27 Dec 2008 , 7:49am
post #16 of 31

I agree with tracey1970, the strips and the flower nail is the best for me. thumbs_up.gif

iloveganache Posted 30 Dec 2008 , 6:46pm
post #17 of 31

Thanks for posting this rezzy!

alliebear Posted 30 Dec 2008 , 6:59pm
post #18 of 31

i sometimes use this technique but i have a convection oven and i found that if i turn the fan off and just use the bake setting i dont get that dome on top and the cakes are pretty nice and level... just a little bit of leveling with a knife and thats it. i have also found that it makes perfect cupcakes this way too!!

eldag0615 Posted 15 Jan 2009 , 11:51pm
post #19 of 31

Thanks for the wonderful pictures, as I write, I have in the oven one cake using the flower nails for the first time, I can't wait to see it fully baked, also is my first time I bake the WASC recipe from here. Let's see.

tinygoose Posted 19 May 2009 , 4:02pm
post #20 of 31

save

deelovlie1 Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 6:03pm
post #21 of 31

whoo hooo! Im gonna try it out!! The tops of my cakes always dome. I thought it was just something I did wrong, I guess It was cause I wasnt using this...I only leveled a couple times but I did it with Invisible string because my wilton leveler got lost while letting someone borrow it icon_sad.gif
Thank you for the visuals very very helpful!

crazielady38 Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 6:11pm
post #22 of 31

I hear about this method often but never was brave enough to try. Thanks for sharing.

adree313 Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 6:24pm
post #23 of 31

i'm definitely going to start using this trick, but i have to ask... exactly how does it keep the cakes from doming? i don't quite understand that aspect of this.

JulyMama Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 8:23pm
post #24 of 31

I put my nails (greased) in the pan first then pour the batter in after. Does it make a difference what you do? Wouldn't you end up with batter under the nail if you put it in after? I just bang the pan on the counter to settle the batter and get the air bubbles out, I haven't had any problems, though I do usually have a slight dome on the top.

Peridot Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 8:52pm
post #25 of 31

I put my greased nail(s) in the pan first and then put my batter around the nail. I also use the Wilton baking strips and have great results uisng both at the same time.

crystalina1977 Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 8:55pm
post #26 of 31

thanks for posting these pics =) it seems so simple but i have never been successful in this! now i will try it again =)

rezzygirl Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 9:07pm
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by adree313

i'm definitely going to start using this trick, but i have to ask... exactly how does it keep the cakes from doming? i don't quite understand that aspect of this.




My "theory" is that you get a dome when the center cooks slower than the outsides. The nail heats up enough to radiate from the middle and cook the cake more evenly in the center. But like I said, just a theory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JulyMama

I put my nails (greased) in the pan first then pour the batter in after. Does it make a difference what you do? Wouldn't you end up with batter under the nail if you put it in after? I just bang the pan on the counter to settle the batter and get the air bubbles out, I haven't had any problems, though I do usually have a slight dome on the top.




I used to do it that way, but it was a pain to get it even and not knock the nail over while pouring the batter in. Someone posted (sorry forgot who) that they forgot to put the nail in before, so they put the nail in after the batter was in the pan and it came out fine. I tried it and have been doing it that way ever since. When I put the nail in, I make sure it is touching the bottom of my cake pan by moving it back and forth very slightly while pushing down. Comes out just as pictured without any cake stuck under it!

cindy1176 Posted 4 Jun 2009 , 2:43pm
post #28 of 31

Thank you! I will be trying this this weekend...

Ruth0304 Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 9:43pm
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by rezzygirl

Just a quick demo to show what the flower nail method looks like. This method is an alternative to using "bake even strips" for a cake that requires less to no leveling after baking.
Hope this is helpful.

______________________________
-Rezzy




I know you posted this long ago just wanted to say thanks, I'm actually trying it now icon_wink.gif

mjk350 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 9:42pm
post #30 of 31

Thanks for sharing this. Will give it a try. thumbs_up.gif

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