Unthaw

Decorating By Wesha Updated 19 Dec 2008 , 11:44am by kakeladi

Wesha Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 2:35am
post #1 of 16

Guys, I froze my cakes. I am taking them out tonight to unthaw. I had wrapped them in plastic wrap, then Reynolds wrap, then put in ziplock bags. When I take them out, do I take them out the ziplock bag and leave them wrapped or what?

thanks

Benisha

15 replies
YALANTZI Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 2:46am
post #2 of 16

I would probably take them out of the zip lock and leave them outside to thaw out, are you goint to do fondant or buttercream?
if buttercream I would go ahead and frost semi-frozen.

Wesha Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 2:48am
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by YALANTZI

I would probably take them out of the zip lock and leave them outside to thaw out, are you goint to do fondant or buttercream?
if buttercream I would go ahead and frost semi-frozen.




Yalantzi,

I am using buttercream.

KathyTW Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 3:02am
post #4 of 16

I would unwrap all layers before they completely thaw out, if you wait too long the plastic wrap may stick and pull your cake apart.

(BTW.. if you "unthaw" something you would be freezing it !!!! icon_biggrin.gif )

steplite Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 3:26am
post #5 of 16

I've heard so many different opinions about weather to unwrap or not to unwrap frozen cakes. I think it depends on the cake recipe you use. I've only done it once and I wrapped the same as you did but I didn't upwrap ,just let it unthaw on the counter. When I unwrapped, my cakes were wet on the top and I had to scape the tops off. I don't know if that was because I always use the extender recipe with 1/2 butter, 1/2 oil, sour cream and milk. Maybe all the dairy was the cause. Anyway, I think the next time, I'll unwrap first and see my results.

kakeladi Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 3:27am
post #6 of 16

Take the cakes out of the plastic bag & foil; leave the plastic wrap on to thaw overnight.

Wesha Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 3:52am
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Take the cakes out of the plastic bag & foil; leave the plastic wrap on to thaw overnight.




Okay, I took the foil off and left the plastic wrap on. I have them sitting on cooling racks and cookie sheets. After they thaw out, will the cake stick to the plastic wrap.

kandu001 Posted 12 Dec 2008 , 12:01am
post #8 of 16

Sorry I couldn't help, but I just found this thread. Let us know how it turned out and don't forget to post a pic!

tracey1970 Posted 12 Dec 2008 , 1:55am
post #9 of 16

I freeze all my cakes in two layers of saran and two of foil. I thaw them in the fridge still wrapped overnight, and then take them out the morning I want to decorate, still wrapped. I allow to sit at room temp for a bit, and then unwrap and let sit at room temp for a bit longer (or I will sometimes fill right away after unwrapping and let the cake sit for a bit to allow the filling to settle and ensure the icing dam is stiff enough to hold - this will bring the cake to more of a room temp with the filling in it). I've never had an issue with sticking or anything. I do recommend thawing in the fridge as it doesn't take that long and will cut down on condensation from the cake thawing too quickly and them getting gooey from the moisture.

ladyonzlake Posted 12 Dec 2008 , 2:06am
post #10 of 16

I agree with Tracey. I thaw in frig. with wrappings on for a couple of hours. They do thaw quickly and nicely in the frig.

kakeladi Posted 12 Dec 2008 , 2:08am
post #11 of 16

Sorry I oculdn't get back to you sooner.....have had computer problemsicon_sad.gif
By now you have probably completed the cake. Everything should have worked out just fine. If not, do advise us so we can help others in the future.
Do remember to post pix when it's finishedicon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 12 Dec 2008 , 2:17am
post #12 of 16

Just to add to the collection of opinions:

I wrap in a single layer of saran and freeze. To thaw, I just throw 'em on the counter. I do not unwrap. The saran does not stick to the cake.

Think about when you take a loaf of bread out of the freezer. you don't lay the slices of bread out on the counter ... you leave them in the bread wrapper to thaw, otherwise they would get dry.

Cakepro Posted 12 Dec 2008 , 2:19am
post #13 of 16

Unthaw?? Unthaw = refreeze. LOL

Wesha Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 2:52am
post #14 of 16

Hi Guys,

Everything turned out beautifully except when I went to snap pictures of all those cakes (64 of them 8in rounds) my batteries were dead in my camera. I was so disappointed. This was my largest order yet and I have no proof to show for it. Anyway, the cakes thawed out perfectly and there was no condensation on them. My customer said everyone raved at how moist the cakes were. It was for a church fundraiser. Thanks Kakeladi for all your help and everyone else who gave me some sound advice. I think from here on out, I will bake a few cakes and leave them in the freezer until someone orders one of them.

Frankyola Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 4:49am
post #15 of 16

Ok, here I go again icon_redface.gif , I have a ???? if I frost my cake when still frozen, Can I live it until it is room temp. and then cover with fondant?

TIA

Frankyia

kakeladi Posted 19 Dec 2008 , 11:44am
post #16 of 16

It is not a good idea to ice fzn cakes. You will find it hard to work w/a fzn cake as it makes the icing get hard and it won't smooth. But what you are suggestion is crumb coating . It might work but I still would not suggest it. Instead I would put the layers together, crumb coat then fz.

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