Price For 3D Car Cake??

Business By korkyo Updated 31 Jan 2009 , 1:30pm by -K8memphis

korkyo Posted 20 Nov 2008 , 10:10pm
post #1 of 13

I have someone wanting a 3d mercedes for a grooms cake.

Probably cut it out of a half sheet and cover it in fondant.
What would you charge?

12 replies
karateka Posted 22 Nov 2008 , 10:40pm
post #2 of 13

My 3D cakes start at $4/serving, and go up based on amount of detailing or special cake supports I need to use.

Rocketgirl899 Posted 22 Nov 2008 , 10:59pm
post #3 of 13

my old shop charged $6 for cars

sweetcakes Posted 22 Nov 2008 , 11:42pm
post #4 of 13

how ever much timeyou think its going to take, double it. The planning alone will take an hour or so, then youll need to make the supporting board, get the wheels made, so there is alot of time spent even before you start baking. so dont under charge.

cakesbydina Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 7:43pm
post #5 of 13

I charge $5 per serving of any sculpted cake and have a minimum of 25 servings. This way it's worth my time.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 8:56pm
post #6 of 13

Yeah, I start 3-D cakes at $150, then go up $4 to $5 per additional serving based on how big it will end up being. The cars do take a while because of the planning. They always take longer than you think they will.

cakesdivine Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:08pm
post #7 of 13

The weird thing is I charge by the amount of cake that must be baked to create the 3D sculpture if it takes a 1/2 sheet worth of cake that is 24 servings using the 8 cubic inch per serving method (same as Wilton method - 1x2x4 or 2x2x2) if it takes a full sheet then 48 servings I charge $7 per serving even if the finished amount is less than the amount of servings (which it will be) of the core cake you carved away from. I still charge for all the cake I had to bake whether used or not.

so my handbags which are out of a 1/4 sheet I charge $84 each, An Item carved from a 1/2 sheet is $168. An 8" 2 layer round is the same amount of cake as a 1/4 sheet, a 10" 2 layer round is the same as a 1/2 sheet, a 12" 2 layer round is the same as a 3/4 sheet, and a 14" 2 layer round is the same as a full sheet.

-K8memphis Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:16pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

The weird thing is I charge by the amount of cake that must be baked to create the 3D sculpture if it takes a 1/2 sheet worth of cake that is 24 servings using the 8 cubic inch per serving method (same as Wilton method - 1x2x4 or 2x2x2) if it takes a full sheet then 48 servings I charge $7 per serving even if the finished amount is less than the amount of servings (which it will be) of the core cake you carved away from. I still charge for all the cake I had to bake whether used or not.

so my handbags which are out of a 1/4 sheet I charge $84 each, An Item carved from a 1/2 sheet is $168. An 8" 2 layer round is the same amount of cake as a 1/4 sheet, a 10" 2 layer round is the same as a 1/2 sheet, a 12" 2 layer round is the same as a 3/4 sheet, and a 14" 2 layer round is the same as a full sheet.




A full sheet cake is 100 servings isn't it? It used to be.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 11:30pm
post #9 of 13

A 1/4 sheet is 9x13 but a lot of people think of that as a half sheet for some reason. A half sheet is 12x18, and would the full sheet be 18x24? I can't remember exactly, those larger pans are something that commercial kitchens use, but since I've been baking using my home oven for so long I can't rememebr. icon_smile.gif

I learned long ago that when a client calls and asks for a half sheet to make sure they mean 12x18, not 9x13. Then I usually confuse them and they have to go get a ruler. icon_lol.gif

-K8memphis Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 11:39pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

A 1/4 sheet is 9x13 but a lot of people think of that as a half sheet for some reason. A half sheet is 12x18, and would the full sheet be 18x24? I can't remember exactly, those larger pans are something that commercial kitchens use, but since I've been baking using my home oven for so long I can't rememebr. icon_smile.gif

I learned long ago that when a client calls and asks for a half sheet to make sure they mean 12x18, not 9x13. Then I usually confuse them and they have to go get a ruler. icon_lol.gif




Yes, a full is 18x24 give or take and 9 times 12 is 108 servings at 2x2x2.
So from there you get a half sheet, 50 servings give or take and
a quarter sheet is 24 servings.

Wilton has a 3/4 sized pan or two so there's that too.

But a full sheet is 100 servings.

cakesdivine Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 6:46am
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

A full sheet cake is 100 servings isn't it? It used to be.




It can serve up to 96 with a 1x2x2 serving which actually is half the amount of actual cake a wedding cake serving of 1x2x4. So if you want the same amount of cake as a wedding cake serving, 8 cubic inches then you use the 2x2x2 size for true accurate pricing. There for a full sheet will yield 48 billable servings not 96. Sorry, math person here icon_smile.gif

cakesdivine Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 6:58am
post #12 of 13

Okay I analysed this further instead of just taking Wilton's word. I know that a 9x13 is a quarter sheet but the cake is never actually that big especially if you trim the edges like I do so it really becomes an 8x12x2, which is exactly 24 servings of 8 cubic inches of cake. Then half sheet would be double that then a full sheet double that. At least it is for me as I use quarters to build my halfs and fulls. So sorry, I was just quoting from the base of what I knew...Actually is more per serving admitting with egg on face, I goofed.

-K8memphis Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 1:30pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

...with egg on face...




Naw it was just a smidge of meringue.

(((hug)))

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