Science Of Cake Baking !

Baking By ljdills Updated 28 Nov 2008 , 1:31pm by leah_s

ljdills Posted 20 Nov 2008 , 8:15pm
post #1 of 9

I have found several cake recipes that I love and I don't know how to correctly multiply the recipe if the recipe only makes two nine inch rounds and I want to make a say a three tiered cake.
Do I just double/triple all ingredients. Some recipes state that they can be doubled, but many do not.

8 replies
JoAnnB Posted 21 Nov 2008 , 12:21am
post #2 of 9

the only way to be sure is to try it, but I would only double rather than triple a recipe, just to err on the safe side.

Mike1394 Posted 21 Nov 2008 , 10:16am
post #3 of 9

All recipes can be multiplied, or divided. The issue being are you sure it's a good recipe? There are a lot of recipes that aren't any good.

Mike

JanH Posted 28 Nov 2008 , 9:15am
post #4 of 9

Recipes can be multiplied. icon_smile.gif

But it's not simply a matter of multiplying all the ingredients ... icon_surprised.gif

Here's a similar thread:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-610890-.html

HTH

Mike1394 Posted 28 Nov 2008 , 10:37am
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Recipes can be multiplied. icon_smile.gif

But it's not simply a matter of multiplying all the ingredients ... icon_surprised.gif

Here's a similar thread:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-610890-.html

HTH




What if you have recipes that are just percentages?

Mike

lovely Posted 28 Nov 2008 , 10:47am
post #6 of 9

I would make a recipe into percentages if it wasn't. Convert everything into grams (or oz) then make the weights into percentage of the whole (100%) recipe. If it was in percentages then the recipe would be easy to scale wouldn't it. Sort of like a formulation, I used to have food techs forget to put the weights but the total weight and the percentages of each ingredient.
HTH or makes sense icon_lol.gif
Leigh

JanH Posted 28 Nov 2008 , 11:00am
post #7 of 9

Since I'm not a food scientist or a baking professional, I pass along links which have info from (generally) respected members of the professional baking community.....

However, I do know that cake "recipes" are for home bakeries.

Professional bakers use "formulas" which can be easily scaled.

But even this home baker knows that there's a difference between making tons of batter to fill numerous similarly sized tins and making tons of batter for one huge tin.

Has to do with pan depth and surface area.....and then the rest is Greek to me. (Have I mentioned that math formulas are NOT my cup of tea.)

HTH

Mike1394 Posted 28 Nov 2008 , 11:07am
post #8 of 9

Yeah but if it's a good recipe you should be able to scale for 1, or 100. The ratios will always be the same.

Mike

leah_s Posted 28 Nov 2008 , 1:31pm
post #9 of 9

II think Mike is talking about Baker's Percentages. If you understand how to calculate these, then, yes you can scale any recipe/formula to any size.

For the home baker, I'd really suggest following the tips in The Cake Bible for scaling up recipes.

Baker's Percentage is not the simpliest idea to either explain or understand. For example, using Baker's Percentage, a formula has more than 100%. If you're "math challenged" it will bend your brain.

If you don't own a copy ot The Cake Bible (and it really should be in your personal library) then visit your local library.

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