Can You Torte A Character Cake????

Decorating By Kate285 Updated 19 Nov 2008 , 5:07pm by kokopuff

Kate285 Posted 18 Nov 2008 , 9:28pm
post #1 of 8

I am planning to make a Barney cake using a wilton Barney Cake pan for a co-worker to take to her niece's birthday. I am a newbie at cake decorating as I am in my first course of the Wilton cake decorating class at Michaels.

I was wondering if you are able to torte a character cake so that I may add a layer of strawberry filling in the middle of the cake? I wasn't sure if doing this would mess up the shape of the cake. Please give suggestions and feedbak.

Thanks a bunch!

7 replies
karateka Posted 18 Nov 2008 , 9:51pm
post #2 of 8

I haven't looked at the Barney pan, but I would think you could torte a character cake. Be sure it is far enough down the height of the cake that the extra height from the filling won't distort the design. And use a really stiff icing dam so it won't slide or bulge. Good luck!

kakeladi Posted 19 Nov 2008 , 12:27am
post #3 of 8

If you don't want to try the injection method of filling it.

q2wheels Posted 19 Nov 2008 , 12:35am
post #4 of 8

Hi Kate,

I do it all the time! A couple of things....I tend to fill the pan a bit more than the instructions say (I use WASC and there is more than enough batter). The cake rises above the pan, good for levelling without losing too much cake. Then you have a nice, high cake to torte.

After torting, I slide a thin cutting board under the top, easier to place it back on the cake.

As stated previously, be sure your dam icing is stiff. I then let the filled cake settle for at least 2 - 4 hours (sometimes overnight) before decorating.

HTH,

Toni Ann

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kate285

I am planning to make a Barney cake using a wilton Barney Cake pan for a co-worker to take to her niece's birthday. I am a newbie at cake decorating as I am in my first course of the Wilton cake decorating class at Michaels.

I was wondering if you are able to torte a character cake so that I may add a layer of strawberry filling in the middle of the cake? I wasn't sure if doing this would mess up the shape of the cake. Please give suggestions and feedbak.

Thanks a bunch!


AlamoSweets Posted 19 Nov 2008 , 3:25am
post #5 of 8

I bake two and slice off the character of one to make a flat surface then I stack the second one on top. It gives a great height to the cake and feeds a lot more.

springlakecake Posted 19 Nov 2008 , 1:35pm
post #6 of 8

yes, but the character pans can be a PITA. I find the the edges get all crunchy and it is hard to slice. Plus the corners dont rise up as much as the rest of the cake, again making it harder to torte nicely. I did as some else suggested, baking 2. It was still a challenge.

kakeladi Posted 19 Nov 2008 , 4:54pm
post #7 of 8

The problem w/those pans is they are made of a thinner gauge metal the most pans. One thing that can help is to bake it in a water bath: put your shaped pan into a bigger pan w/about 1" of water in it.
You can try to wrap the pan in bake even strips but some shapes makes that hard to do.

kokopuff Posted 19 Nov 2008 , 5:07pm
post #8 of 8

Hey kakeladi,just wondering if the water bath would work on any size?Like a 6 in round or an 8 in square.O the sides of the character cakes I usually just go around underneath the edges with extra icing before going over the whole thing with icing but I think I will give your method a try to save icing. icon_smile.gif

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