How Do I Cover A 3D Snowman With Fondant?

Decorating By giland Updated 15 Nov 2008 , 12:48am by ceshell

giland Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 5:51pm
post #1 of 4

I am a novice cake decorator but I love to try new things. I have worked with MMF once before. I havea 3D snowman cake pan similar to the one from Williams and Sonoma. I want to make this cake for my daughter's 1st birthday. I was hoping to do do more than just buttercream stars and thought fondant would be a better effect for a snowman. I was not sure how I would cover the cake with fondant. I am not sure how I would cover the whole cake with fondant once it was assembled without their being strange lumps around each of the sections. I think it would be possible to cover the two halves independently and then put them together but that would leave an awkward seam. Do folks with more experience have and suggestions?

3 replies
Tisha___ Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 6:43pm
post #2 of 4

This is a good question! I'd like to know the answer too.

Tisha___ Posted 14 Nov 2008 , 9:04pm
post #3 of 4

I'd still like to know about this one. Anyone?

Bump!

ceshell Posted 15 Nov 2008 , 12:48am
post #4 of 4

I don't have any experience in the matter, but BECAUSE of that, I would try doing the two halves separately, and then putting them together. Leave a little overhang on one of them to overlap at the join, and then use water to rub out the seam. I have used the water trick to repair tears, and also to eliminate seams on gumpaste figures. I am sure it would work on the seam, although I can't vouch for how smooth you'll be able to get it.

Either that or assemble the cake and freeze it, then try to cover the whole thing on its side (log roll style), then you'll only have one seam in the back. This is the method that I've been told works best for tall cylinder cakes (like a pot; I didn't use this method and totally had a disaster). Although, as you slowly work the fondant around the cake I have no idea how you'd keep from smashing the front side while you went to work on the back...at least with a cylinder, the surface is flat. Yikes, good luck!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%