My Most Moist Cake EVER baking tips!

Baking By cakesdivine Updated 18 Jun 2009 , 2:31am by CakeandDazzle

ShopGrl1128 Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 9:33pm
post #31 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

I just posted my buttercream recipe. You will get sweating at some point during the defrost, but it usually doesn't happen until after the cake is fully iced. Icing a cake should be a rapidily done task, if you move too slowly you will have a problem, not only with the icing forming condensation prior to the cake being fully iced but then you have the huge crum factor, especially with chocolate cakes, it can tear up hugh chunks if the cake is defrosted fully when you try to ice it after using the most moist cake method.

After you ice the cake allow it to fully defrost and the sweat to naturally dry before decorating, or if covering with fondant, do so immediately after icing, actually after you ice it before covering with fondant refrigerate the cake so the icing is set, then cover with the fondant.




Yes, you are right!
I'm extremely slow when it come to icing...I will try to speed up.

Thank you so much for all your help.

Can't wait to try this method and your BC sounds yummy icon_smile.gif

Mike1394 Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 9:37pm
post #32 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steffen74

I have also always frozen my cakes and agree that it make them truly moist and delicious. I used to wrap them hot until I read in another forum about a year ago that this is dangerous, as the moisture trapped between the plastic and the cake is a breeding ground for bacteria, and this is the reason one should always, without exception, cool cakes before wrapping them. Not trying to challenge, and I have no scientific leaning, just offering what I have read.

Has anyone else heard this? I would love for someone with a scientific background to tell me for sure that this is in fact a safe procedure...




Bacteria needs three things to survive, temp, moisture, and food.

Mike

BCJean Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 9:53pm
post #33 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

I just posted my buttercream recipe.




How did you post the recipe? I can't find it.
Thanks.

MacsMom Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 9:53pm
post #34 of 122

I hate the extra step of using a syrup. I think the WASC recipe is the most moist I've ever had so I use variations of it for everything.

I did the taste test with my family on Halloween between a cake that was frozen for a week (after it cooled but still warm) and one that I had made the day before: The frozen cake won hands down with a 100% preference. (It was the same chocolate recipe).

panchanewjersey Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 9:55pm
post #35 of 122

Thanks, and your right when it comes to plastic wrap it messes up shape of cake when it shrinks because of heat. Thanks for other info I guess we share the same info.

annacakes Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 10:02pm
post #36 of 122

I too am looking for the buttercream recipe from cakes divine!

sunlover00 Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 10:03pm
post #37 of 122

I have always used a similar method but never freeze the cake. As soon as the cake is taken out of the oven, I cover it with foil, then cover with the cooling rack and flip it right side up. So the foil is between the cake and the rack. I leave the cake in the pan on the rack for at least an hour. THEN I take the pan off and cover the cake with regular plastic wrap to cool completely. I wrap the edges of the foil around the plastic to lock in any remaining heat/steam. This way, the cake has cooled enough so that the wrap doesn't shrink and the pan retains the moisture after baking until it's uncovered. I will sometimes wrap the foil up around the pan so that no steam escapes. The cake is always very moist. I don't have freezer space for the amount of cakes I make each week. icon_smile.gif

pmaucher Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 10:27pm
post #38 of 122

Cakesdivine,

How do you handle cakes that need to be carved?

Pam

DDiva Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 10:46pm
post #39 of 122

I originally tried Scott Woolley's method not because of a need to retain moisture, but because I sculpt a lot of cakes and freezing makes the cake easier to cut. The moisture retention was a bonus, but it really does work.

Concerned about bacteria...the cake put directly into the freezer cools down very quickly. It's also a great way to cool a cake quickly for a rush order. There's probably more bacteria on the sponge you washed the pan with icon_biggrin.gif
I think that what we've discovered is that there are loads of different ways to obtain fantastic results. It's always nice to learn something new, and it can't hurt to try something new. If it doesn't work for you, it doesn't work for you.

adonisthegreek1 Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 11:07pm
post #40 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steffen74

I have also always frozen my cakes and agree that it make them truly moist and delicious. I used to wrap them hot until I read in another forum about a year ago that this is dangerous, as the moisture trapped between the plastic and the cake is a breeding ground for bacteria, and this is the reason one should always, without exception, cool cakes before wrapping them. Not trying to challenge, and I have no scientific leaning, just offering what I have read.

Has anyone else heard this? I would love for someone with a scientific background to tell me for sure that this is in fact a safe procedure...



Bacteria needs three things to survive, temp, moisture, and food.

Mike




Mike, that's what they tell us in pastry school. I do freeze cakes though and they are moist. I just don't wrap and freeze them until they have cooled completely.

jlsheik Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 11:36pm
post #41 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Why not just use a recipe that yields a moist cake? Instead of using trapped steam to give you the moistness you desire.

Mike




My thoughts exactly!!! lol But I was taught to wrap in foil and I always have....I think it would be moist with out it. Of course I use only CC recipes!!! lol

cakesdivine Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 12:50am
post #42 of 122

Oh, I posted my recipe right here on the forum for recipes & tips.

As far as bacteria, freezing kills bacteria, and placing in the freezer flash cools the cake as well, a method all food handlers learn in food management courses. Bacteria breeds between 42 degrees F. and under 140 degrees F. Food left in this temp range is always open for bacteria. Also a hot cake fresh from the oven also has killed any bacteria present during the baking process. So freeze away without concern.

Mike, I personally don't care for cakes that use simple syrup, I'm not saying it is wrong I just don't think adding more sugar to your cake is not the best way to make it super moist. Yes you can still have a moist cake scratch or other without using this method, but this method makes the cake super moist and it lasts at this moisture (if covered properly) for up to 7 days.

Not sure why you seem so abrasive about this tip, try it or not, matters not to me. This method works wonderfully for me & my clients swear by me because of it. I now live 200 miles from where I started my business, and have had to reopen a location in my former city, with my daughter at the helm just because my former clients there keep begging me to come home...LOL! And I live in a tourist town now and the majority of my wedding clientel tends to still be from my home town, so many brides come here to get married because there are so many beautiful outdoor wedding venues here (right on the river). I have even had a few brides purposely get married here just so I will do their cakes because for years I have been doing their birthday cakes & other special occasion cakes.

Frozen cake carves easier, I either use my buttercream or a ganache to hold the cake layers together before carving, then ice with my butter cream before decorating or covering with fondant. I always re-freeze as needed so cake doesn't tear apart.

cakesdivine Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 1:01am
post #43 of 122

Sorry guys, I am new to this site, just found the recipe submission tab. I have also posted this here in the recipe & tips forum as well.

Mike1394 Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 1:36am
post #44 of 122

Not abrasive at all, just dfference of opinion. I don't agree with steaming a cake for moistness when I can do it with flour, eggs, and sugar.

Mike

cakesdivine Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 1:48am
post #45 of 122

No harm no foul Mike...to each his own. Bake ON! icon_wink.gif

becklynn Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 1:59am
post #46 of 122

Thanks for this tip. I can't wait to try it, but my freezer space is limited. If you don't have enough freezer space, what is the next best option - would you still cover it in press-n-seal and just leave it out until it cooled? or put it in the fridge?
Thanks!

cakesdivine Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 2:03am
post #47 of 122

The freezing is pretty crucial, if you just cool it the cake will be too moist to handle and will break apart when moved. I have at times had to place other freezer items in a cooler temporarily to give room for cakes. icon_biggrin.gif

sisita Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 2:18am
post #48 of 122

Thanks,

mommy2kids Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 2:45am
post #49 of 122

Hey there cakesdivine, sounds like you are quite the pro... I can't find that buttercream recipe that you posted. Do you have a certain method you use for smoothing your buttercream since you said it doesn't crust? Please let me know, desperate for a great cake and buttercream recipe! Theresa

mommy2kids Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 2:50am
post #50 of 122

cakesdivine, I found the recipe! YEAH... Can this buttercream stand out at room tempature for a long period of time? If not do you have one that tastes good that can stand out?

Amy729 Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 2:54am
post #51 of 122

Also, I would love to know if you have tried it with pasturized eggs whites.

Thanks for posting!

amy

MacsMom Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 4:17am
post #52 of 122

Why is it that you can't freeze it while it's still in the pan? That's how I always do it, albeit it's after the cake has been out of the oven for about an hour. It's easy to get out of the pan when frozen.

cakesdivine Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 4:31am
post #53 of 122

The pan holds so much heat that the baking process will continue for a few more minutes, plus it take the cake longer to cool down. Also trying to dump the cake frozen, at least in my experience, the cake side stick unless I use a knife to loosen it, and many time tear up the side of the cake in doing so.

On the icing...it works fine at room temp & can last for up to 3 days on the counter with no problem, and yes, you can buy the pasturized egg whites in a carton - omit the cream of tartar if using the pasturized egg whites, just don't try to use meringue powder, it deflates too quickly.

cocobean Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 4:58am
post #54 of 122

o.k. cakes divine, did you say you just posted your bc recipe tonight and people are able to find it tonight? I posted a recipe for Key Lime cake and Key Lime bc several days ago and I can't find it yet. I was told it can take several days before I will see it. What am I doing wrong? Anyone?

cakesdivine Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 5:09am
post #55 of 122

I posted it first on the recipes & tips forum (this forum actually) first. It may not be showing on the recipes tab yet but it is showing on the forum topic Butter Cream Icing Supreme - Super buttery flavor (I think that's what I put...LOL!)

melysa Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 5:12am
post #56 of 122

not trying to stir up trouble...just thought i'd share what i've been taught. when making scratch cakes, the extra moisture trapped in by wrapping a cake immediately after baking will make the cake more prone to the growth of bacteria, since there are no preservatives (like in a box mix). i feel like its better to be safe than sorry and cool the cakes fully before wrapping.

melysa Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 5:19am
post #57 of 122

(just read that this was already discussed *)

cakesdivine Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 5:19am
post #58 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by melysa

not trying to stir up trouble...just thought i'd share what i've been taught. when making scratch cakes, the extra moisture trapped in by wrapping a cake immediately after baking will make the cake more prone to the growth of bacteria, since there are no preservatives (like in a box mix). i feel like its better to be safe than sorry and cool the cakes fully before wrapping.




This is only an issue if you leave it on the counter wrapped or in the fridge wrapped. Freezing kills any potential bacteria, and the heat from baking kills any as well. The only way bacteria can breed is in a temp from 40 degrees to 140 degrees F. Anything over or under kills it. That is why the immediate freeze is so important. And if you are using any flour that is enriched or bleached, guess what it has preservatives in it. It has to say organic flour to not have any preservatives.

Cookie4 Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 5:25am
post #59 of 122

Thanks everyone for posting your comments - this has been very informative.

sillyjodes Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 5:55am
post #60 of 122

Ok, I'm drawn in by the critter talk and have to add a few comments. Freezing does not kill bacteria. They hibernate under adverse conditions and start reproducing like rabbits as soon as they get toasty again. Also, bacteria and fungus can produce spores to survive colder temps. They quickly "bloom" at room temperature. Any bacteria in your kitchen, on your hands, or on your wrap can contaminate a cake fresh from the oven. That being said, you will find higher bacteria counts in a sponge (ewww) and in the kitchen sink (seriously the drain is worse than a toilet). But I'm not eating or eating out of either.
Jodie

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