How To Make A "pipeable" Chocolate Mousse

Decorating By staceyboots Updated 13 Nov 2008 , 12:45pm by HerBoudoir

staceyboots Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 1:36am
post #1 of 7

Hi CC

I made my first cheesecake over the weekend and it was so delicious I am seriously considering selling cheesecakes for Christmas. So I went to the cheesefactory's website and immediately started to salivate just by looking at the cheesecakes.

does anyone know how to make the mousse borders (rosettes) like the cheesecakefactory? is the mousse recipe similar to a ganache recipe? do you whip it, chill it and then pipe it?

oh...and can i add lorann flavourings and gel paste colours to cheesecake batter?

your responses are appreciated.

TIA
LL

6 replies
staceyboots Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 10:22am
post #2 of 7

bump

ibmoser Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:47pm
post #3 of 7

Not sure about the gel colors, but you can always use whipped ganache instead of mousse - just whip your ganache until it incorporates air like whipped cream would. It can be easily piped into borders or those beautiful rosettes. Maybe someone will chime in with gel vs. oil-based pigments.

HerBoudoir Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 3:00pm
post #4 of 7

I think the rosettes on the commercially made cheesecakes tend to be more fudgy in texture than a mousse.

I use beaten ganache myself to pipe rosettes a lot of times, as well as a substitute for mousse filling. It's the same consistency but a little more quick to make and very good. You can play with the ratio of chocolate-to-heavy cream ratio to see what works for you texture-wise.

My basic recipe is very simple: Melt 4 ounces of chocolate with 1/4 cup heavy cream, stirring until the chocolate is melted and smooth. Let it cool to room temp. In a cold bowl, whip 3/4 cups heavy cream until medium peak, then add the cooled ganache, and whip to stiff peak. This will pipe easily at this point, and firm up in the fridge.

A note: Use good quality chocolate (preferably darker), and don't use chocolate chips (they don't, IMHO, melt smoothly enough). You *can* add a little confectioner's sugar to the heavy cream if you want it sweeter, but I think the sweetness in the chocolate (even very dark) is enough for me icon_smile.gif.

I typically use between 2 ounces to 6 ounces of chocolate per 8 fluid ounces of heavy cream, depending on how light I want the texture to be. More chocolate = a denser texture.

staceyboots Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 10:44pm
post #5 of 7

thanks sue!

your post is extremely useful!

i can't wait to try your recommendations with a chocolate-irish cream cheesecake that i am dying to make.

another question...how long does the mousse/ganache topping last outside of the refrigerator?

TIA

012202210 Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 11:34pm
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by HerBoudoir

I think the rosettes on the commercially made cheesecakes tend to be more fudgy in texture than a mousse.

I use beaten ganache myself to pipe rosettes a lot of times, as well as a substitute for mousse filling. It's the same consistency but a little more quick to make and very good. You can play with the ratio of chocolate-to-heavy cream ratio to see what works for you texture-wise.

My basic recipe is very simple: Melt 4 ounces of chocolate with 1/4 cup heavy cream, stirring until the chocolate is melted and smooth. Let it cool to room temp. In a cold bowl, whip 3/4 cups heavy cream until medium peak, then add the cooled ganache, and whip to stiff peak. This will pipe easily at this point, and firm up in the fridge.

A note: Use good quality chocolate (preferably darker), and don't use chocolate chips (they don't, IMHO, melt smoothly enough). You *can* add a little confectioner's sugar to the heavy cream if you want it sweeter, but I think the sweetness in the chocolate (even very dark) is enough for me icon_smile.gif.

I typically use between 2 ounces to 6 ounces of chocolate per 8 fluid ounces of heavy cream, depending on how light I want the texture to be. More chocolate = a denser texture.




thank you for sharing!! what ratios would you recommend for using the ganache as a filling?

HerBoudoir Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 12:45pm
post #7 of 7

If you want a mousse-texture, use the method above.

If you want a pourable-type ganache, you can use equal parts chocolate to heavy cream (i.e. - 8 ounces chocolate to 8 fluid ounces heavy cream). Chop up the chocolate, add both the chocolate and the heavy cream to a micro-proof bowl, and melt in the micro on 50% power in 45 second intervals, stirring well each pause. Or you can do it over a water bath on the stove.

If you want a thicker ganache to use as a truffle-style rich filling, I'd add a little less cream, so think 8 ounces chocolate to 6 ounces heavy cream. Make as above. Want it extra-rich? Add an extra tablespoon of butter.

And of course, to any of these, you can add extra flavoring by adding a tablespoon or two of liquor, espresso, etc. I usually add a little instant espresso powder to anything chocolate, because I think it adds complexity...mmmmm...you don't really taste it. A little Kahlua, Gran Marnier, Chambord, kirsch, amaretto, etc adds a really nice flavor component.

I have to admit - most of the time I eyeball ratios rather than measure specifically - it works for me.

Incidentally - great way to make stableized whipped cream for piping: use the mousse method to make ganache, with just an ounce or two of white chocolate to 8 fluid ounces heavy cream.

Regarding refrigeration - for me, if it's got heavy cream in it, it needs to be refrigerated. Opinions do vary on that though. However, I have a couple people in my life that fall into the "potential problem" category for food issues, so I'm very cautious.

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