What Sort Of Icing Should I Use?

Decorating By Tisha___ Updated 13 Nov 2008 , 7:44pm by mandifrye

Tisha___ Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 1:13am
post #1 of 22

I have an idea for a cake for my cousin's birthday, but I don't know what to use to make the topper.

Here's what I'm thinking... please, someone tell me if this sounds like it will work or not. Thanks in advance!

I was thinking I could print out the her age (23) in large font, then tape a piece of wax or parchment paper over it, then use maybe sucker sticks, and make the numbers out of (I have no idea) fondant or something? Then after it dries or whatever, the sucker sticks will stick into the cake and hold the numbers there. I hope this is making sense.

Something like how this number 1 looks on this cake.

http://blog.pinkcakebox.com/cupcake-birthday-cake-2008-10-11.htm

Please let me know if I need to clarify further what I mean.

Thanks so much!

21 replies
kakeladi Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 1:58am
post #2 of 22

To look similar to that all you need to do is shape small 'snakes' of fondant. Just take marble size ball of fondant; roll it into a log and continue rolling until it is the size you want, then shape it. Yes, you can print out a font to follow. A kabob stick or one of those extra long toothpicks would work better I think than a sucker stick..

Tisha___ Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:01am
post #3 of 22

Thanks! I didnt think of kabob sticks! Great idea.

Can I use MMF for that? How long does it take it to "dry" or get hard enough to stand without getting floppy? It will be my first time making a fondant cake anyway, so I will have extra fondant to make the numbers with, I'm sure.

karateka Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:07am
post #4 of 22

You could add some tylose or gum tex to the fondant if you want it to dry faster. It would also strengthen it some.

niccicola Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:08am
post #5 of 22

I would use 1/2 MMF 1/2 gum paste to make sure it dries hard. Instead of lollipop sticks, I think I would use wooden dowels.

Alternately, you could do a Color Flow/Royal Icing design using the parchment paper idea if you had a specific font you wanted the numbers to be in. let it sit for a few days before attempting to move it.

Depends on how "round" you want the numbers. Fondant would make it more 3D looking vs. the Color Flow.

enoid Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:12am
post #6 of 22

You will need to add Gum-Tex to the MMF to make it stiff enough. I would let it dry a couple of days.

kakeladi Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:21am
post #7 of 22

HOw long it takes to dry will depend on the weather. A couple of days should do it. Yah, you can add Tylose or GumTex or mix gp w/MMF to help it dry faster & harder.

Tisha___ Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:20pm
post #8 of 22

I've never heard of Gum-Tex. Is that something I should be able to get at a local cake decorating place, or is it something I'd typically have to order online? In other words, is it hard to find or rare?

niccicola Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:23pm
post #9 of 22

wilton has gum-tex that comes in a can similar in size and shape to the color flow can or gum paste mix can. I see it at AC moore all the time, so I'm sure other stores (like Michael's) that carry wilton products would have it.

mandifrye Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 3:59pm
post #10 of 22

You could also use cookies on a stick! They aren't that difficult and you can decorate them to match the cake!

I cut free hand out of NFSC dough all of the time, and they look great. I just made a cookie bouquet with a baby's name in cookies and it was perfect. I can't wait to use a cookie on a cake!

Besides, it will taste much better than a fondant one, and people will actually want to eat it! icon_razz.gif

Just a thought -
Mandi icon_biggrin.gif

Tisha___ Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 4:35pm
post #11 of 22

That's a great idea, actually! Thanks.

What is NFSC though?

mandifrye Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 5:21pm
post #12 of 22

It stands for No Fail Sugar Cookies - it is a really easy recipe that works great for free handing letters, numbers or shapes because there is little spreading. I even free handed ghost cookies for Halloween with individual fingers and none of them spread out of shape! thumbs_up.gif

Here is the recipe
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2055-No-Fail-Sugar-Cookies.html

I have covered them in fondant (Michelle Foster's, Jennifer Dontz's or MacsMom's BC MMF) and Toba's Glace'. They tasted great with all of those on top. The only downfall of the glaze is the drying time, I am VERY impatient, and like to package right away. So, I usually cover in fondant and use the Glace' for accenting!

Toba's Glace' recipe: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2119-Toba-Garretts-Glace-Icing.html

Michelle Foster's fondant: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-3663-Michele-Fosters-Delicious-Fondant.html

BC MMF: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-7262-2-Buttercream-MMF.html

Jennifer Dontz's in on a DVD that is well worth the money at sugardelights.com.

HTH -
Mandi

mkcraig Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 5:38pm
post #13 of 22

If you want to do it out of fondant I'd mix in half gumpaste so that it will dry faster and harder. That's what I ended up using to make the tiara in this cake as when I tried with just fondant I couldn't get it to set up hard enough.

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1164442

I just used my homemade fondant and Wilton's pre-made gumpaste. It worked great.

BCJean Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 5:42pm
post #14 of 22

I like using cookies for stand up designs also, because they are fun to eat. I just use buttercream icing to decorate mine when I use them on the cake like that. I use a flat popsicle stick and glue it to the back of the cookie with candy melts. For this cake I used cookies for the train and for the #2.
LL

kimblyd Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 6:19pm
post #15 of 22

Mandi,

Just wondering how you apply the glaze to cookies with details, say for a gingerbread man or candy cane? Do you paint it on? Or should I use something else?

Cookies on cake sounds yummy to me...sorta like chocolate covered fudge. icon_biggrin.gif

Kim

mandifrye Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 6:42pm
post #16 of 22

I use either a piping bag or cheat and use a squeeze bottle. I don't pipe very well, and I discovered the squeeze bottle. I don't get the wilton ones, the hole is too big. I use the cheapo ones from Wal-Mart for ketchup and mustard. They work great!

HTH

Tisha___ Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 6:45pm
post #17 of 22

I really appreciate all of the great ideas, everyone.

Now I have 1 more questions... what about Modeling Chocolate? Would that work?

gateaux Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 6:48pm
post #18 of 22

You could also use Chocolate - in any color just make it thick and you can insert or pour you chocolate in the shape you need on a kabob stick.

They also make molds, but if you want it big enough, it's fun to free hand too.

Good luck with any medium you choose!

Tisha___ Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 3:43pm
post #19 of 22

gateaux, I was under the impression that Modeling Chocolate (or I think some people call it Candy Clay) was hard (or at least, toosie-roll consistancy). Is that incorrect?

mandifrye Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 4:19pm
post #20 of 22

Well - this question wasn't addressed to me, but I hope I can help! Candy clay sits overnight to harden, and at first, it is very hard. You must break it into small pieces and begin kneading. After kneading, you can mold into shapes or whatever. It can get too soft from the heat of your hands, but if you let it sit again, it will harden back up. I find it always stays softer than dried fondant, but I like to work with it.

HTH

kimblyd Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 5:07pm
post #21 of 22

Thanks Mandi for the info on the glaze and squeeze bottles...I have never tried cookies before and I am looking to doing some Christmas cookie decorating with my daughter this year.

Tisha, I have always had an issue with 3D figures too, including letters and numbers. I've tried practically all the suggestions here-candy clay, fondant, fondant with gumpaste, candy melts (free hand & molds), color flow, royal, etc.

They all work, but each has its drawbacks and limitations. Sometimes you have to try more than one to get the result you need. I'm so glad that people are so willing to share their techniques and ideas.

Kim

mandifrye Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 7:44pm
post #22 of 22

Kim - you are so welcome! BEWARE, cookie decorating is more addictive than this website. I started off just wanting to do some to see what it was like, and now, cookies are my biggest orders and the most fun! (unless you are doing 150+ of the same design! icon_surprised.gif )

Have fun!

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