I'm Sobbing Right Now...need Help Asap...cake Broke....

Decorating By Trixyinaz Updated 14 Nov 2008 , 4:25pm by Trixyinaz

Trixyinaz Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 12:40am
post #1 of 25

I layers my sheet cake and put the bottom layer easily on the cake board and filled it. It looked so pretty. Then I went to put the top layer on and it broke into pieces (lots of expletives as it happened...most the F bomb). I put it back together but I'm scared to even ice this cake and sell it. What should I do....I'm literally in tears and then my DH says, "Are you sure you want to make cakes...it seems like a lot of stress of you." icon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gif
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24 replies
hallow3 Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 12:56am
post #2 of 25

I would add a crumb coat to the layers, add extra to cover the cracks to "paste" it back together. Let it set and "dry". Then cover with icing as usual. Nobody will notice that it was cracked. I have had this happen all too many times. HTH

Trixyinaz Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:03am
post #3 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by hallow3

I would add a crumb coat to the layers, add extra to cover the cracks to "paste" it back together. Let it set and "dry". Then cover with icing as usual. Nobody will notice that it was cracked. I have had this happen all too many times. HTH




Thank you very much! I'm going to try that now.

rachel-b Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:05am
post #4 of 25

I agree. Crumb coat, let it set and it should be fine. I've had this happen before and it turned out fine.

Wesha Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:05am
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trixyinaz

I layers my sheet cake and put the bottom layer easily on the cake board and filled it. It looked so pretty. Then I went to put the top layer on and it broke into pieces (lots of expletives as it happened...most the F bomb). I put it back together but I'm scared to even ice this cake and sell it. What should I do....I'm literally in tears and then my DH says, "Are you sure you want to make cakes...it seems like a lot of stress of you." icon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gif




I too, would put on a real good crumb coat and let it dry well. Then put on extra frosting to cover up the cracks. Also, do not listen to the DH on this one. It happens to all of us.

Karema Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:08am
post #6 of 25

Same here. Crumb coat put in fridge to set up or let it sit and then ice. Good luck

alanaj Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:09am
post #7 of 25

I agree--this is why I hate sheet cakes. I always break at least one layer. Icing is great glue though--don't cry over broken cake. icon_smile.gif It will be fine if you coat it well and let it set. My husband's the same way. Anything that stresses me out stresses him out because he can't just "fix the problem"!

CakeMommyTX Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:10am
post #8 of 25

Yep, crumb coat and then chill it , it will be fine.
By the way what kind if cake is that? Are those cherries I see?

momma28 Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:10am
post #9 of 25

been there broke that. Crumb coat solves all ills icon_smile.gif

justducky Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:15am
post #10 of 25

You got great advice. Just wanted to send you hugs.

Trixyinaz Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:19am
post #11 of 25

Thank you thank you thank you! I've never done crumb coats so I hope I did it okay. It's in the fridge now "chillin" Is 30 minutes okay or should I wait a little longer?

I hate sheet cakes too! They SUCK!

YoursTruly - it is a chocolate cake with fresh raspberry filling. The cake crashed right into the bottom layer on top of the filling so it got all over it. I was livid to say the least. I've had one of my rounds crack before, but it was one crack and it was straight, plus it was for a family party so I didn't care. I wasn't sure about this one since it cracked all over the place.

I can't thank you all again!

ETA: I've had nothing but trouble with this cake....yesterday I totally messed up the raspberry filling...added double the amt. of milk by accident, then added more cornstarch. It tasted terrible so I had to throw that away...very mad as I had to waste 24 oz. of raspberries. Then tonight when I remade the raspberries, I used a differnt recipe that called for water instead and I did the same freaking thing. I don't know where my head is. I fixed it and DH LOVED it. But, talk about being stressed out over this cake! I will be glad when I am done with it!

KitchenKat Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:27am
post #12 of 25

crumb coat yeah! i also like to spackle my cakes ala Toba Garret but omit adding fruit preserves to the spackle. just crumbs and frosting. hides the cracks and craters and holds up well.

nefcook21 Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:33am
post #13 of 25

That is exactly why I don't torte sheet cakes. They become too fragile to handle. I usually just do one layer (unless specifically asked) and have never had a complaint. Sorry this happened but icing is a great glue!

CakeMommyTX Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:51am
post #14 of 25

Sounds yummy!
I would leave it in the fridge until it firms up and then ice.
When I torte sheet cakes or large round cakes I use a cake board to slide the top layer on, that way I don't have to pick it up with my hands and risk it breaking.

KoryAK Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:52am
post #15 of 25

Ditto to everyone else of course... and may I say great puzzle job icon_smile.gif

momvarden Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:55am
post #16 of 25

they are all right!!! icon_biggrin.gif 30 mins should be enough, but touch it if the frosting is firm than you should be ok. be careful of the lift off of the spatula when adding your second fresh layer of frosting.....some times the frosting pulls up exposing the cake again.... i find it happens when the cake is crumble prone. it can be fixed if it happens it just makes it frustrating.

Cakenicing4u Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 1:57am
post #17 of 25

Hint from a grocery store baker tired of filling cakes all freaking weekend.....

If you bake your cakes on parchment, this is what I do at home, and the ones we get at the store are on parchment as well-- and usually it works just fine-- LEAVE THE PARCHMENT ON as you torte it. put the cake on the board upside down.... parchment side up... slice the cake, slide a cake board or a supper skinny cookie sheet under it, and lift up... between the board and the paper, it's going to stay in one piece! then slide it back on again and THEN remove the parchment and ice like usual. You'll be amazed how much better it works!

HTH

newmansmom2004 Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 2:04am
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by yourstrulytx

Sounds yummy!
When I torte sheet cakes or large round cakes I use a cake board to slide the top layer on, that way I don't have to pick it up with my hands and risk it breaking.




Ditto. I use either a cake board or one of my cookie sheets that doesn't have any rim around it. Works like a charm.

momvarden Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 2:06am
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakenicing4u

Hint from a grocery store baker tired of filling cakes all freaking weekend.....

If you bake your cakes on parchment, this is what I do at home, and the ones we get at the store are on parchment as well-- and usually it works just fine-- LEAVE THE PARCHMENT ON as you torte it. put the cake on the board upside down.... parchment side up... slice the cake, slide a cake board or a supper skinny cookie sheet under it, and lift up... between the board and the paper, it's going to stay in one piece! then slide it back on again and THEN remove the parchment and ice like usual. You'll be amazed how much better it works!

HTH



thank you i think a lot of us can learn from that hint. icon_smile.gif

2508s42 Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 3:47am
post #20 of 25

I agree, I just wanted to say... hang in there. It gets easier.

Trixyinaz Posted 11 Nov 2008 , 3:44pm
post #21 of 25

Thank you so much for the tip and for everyone's support. Tonight I get to go home and "paint" The Scream on it. Let's hope all the mishaps aren't indicitive of how this all works out. I'll literally want to SCREAM!

Trixyinaz Posted 12 Nov 2008 , 2:15am
post #22 of 25

Thanks again everyone! I couldn't have gotten through last night without you guys! I just finished the cake. I am very pleased with this one....even tho it was a disaster from the minute I started working on it. Unbelieveably, I had no trouble decorating it. I planned on pulling an all nighter tonight just b/c of the way this cake was going. I was sure something would happen. Thanks again everyone!

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1287014.html

lifonahil Posted 13 Nov 2008 , 5:37am
post #23 of 25

looks like the cake came out great.

PinkZiab Posted 14 Nov 2008 , 3:56pm
post #24 of 25

I realize I'm WAY late on this, but it may help someone in the future.

Another way to more easily handle torting of larger sheets cakes is after torting, slice the top layer in half (yeah I said it). The smaller halves are easy to handle than the full sheet, and once they're frosted, so long as you're base-board is sturdy, there won't be any issues.

Here's a video that shows this method:

http://www.countrykitchensa.com/videos/filling_a_sheet_cake.aspx

I might not do it exactly as they show in the video (filling the two halves separately, unless two different fillings were requested), but it gives you the idea.

Trixyinaz Posted 14 Nov 2008 , 4:25pm
post #25 of 25

Thanks PinkZiab. That looks a hell of a lot easier to do than what I did. I'm definately going to try it that way next time.

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