Placing A Filling In A Cake

Decorating By dd54970 Updated 10 Nov 2008 , 6:15pm by terri-jo

dd54970 Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 4:52pm
post #1 of 5

Hello,

I am baking a tiered cake for this weekend and the birthday girl would like a chocolate filling in one layer and strawberry preserves in the other layer.

I know that I need to create a dam with icing to keep the filling from pushing its way out from between the layers.

But I was wondering should I use something to "seal" the cake so that the cake does not absorb the filling and get mushy??

Any help would be appreciated!!!

Thank you for your time!!! icon_biggrin.gif

4 replies
chelleb1974 Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 4:59pm
post #2 of 5

It would depend on how 'runny' your filling is, and how long it is going to sit before being served. I have put pudding (made with 1 cup or 1.5cups milk instead of 2), and it's been fine for a few days. Same thing with the preserves. If your preserves are runny, or you are concerned, you could put a crumb coat of buttercream on the cake before you pipe the dam and put the filling in.

ChristianD Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 5:39pm
post #3 of 5

I am new to cake decorating, so I am clueless on how to fill a cake. Could some please give me step by step instructions on how to fill a cake? Thank you in advance.

dd54970 Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 5:53pm
post #4 of 5

I will be using a thicker consistency Chocolate Filling (much like a pie filling) and the preserves should be pretty thick right out of the jar so I was hoping to just use it like that.

I think i will be filling the cakes and decorating on Friday night and then I have to deliver and set up the cake on Sat at 530pm. Cake will be served about 730pm.

The crumb coating of BC maybe is a good idea just in case.... I just wasnt sure if the strawberry preserves would absorb in the cake and make it mushy!!

Thanks!!

terri-jo Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 6:15pm
post #5 of 5

I very often use jams and preserves as fillings for my cakes. Sometimes I do as suggested...a crumb coat to act as a barrier to the cake. I don't do it all the time, though. The jam will soak in a bit, but in a good, tasty, make-the-cake-really moist kind of way. And it won't soak in very far. You can really do it either way.

HTH,

Teresa

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