Moist, Tender Cake...is That Bad For Decorating??

Decorating By forthwife Updated 9 Nov 2008 , 11:17pm by JenniferMI

forthwife Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 4:57am
post #1 of 11

Ok, this is probably a super stupid question...but...I'll ask anyway. I've only been decorating a little over three months now and am wanting to make more stacked cakes. I've done two now, the first was obviously a first icon_wink.gif and my second wasn't too bad. (I love and NEED ideas on how to improve! So please look at my stuff and critique me, good and bad!) I try desperately to made delicious, moist and tender cakes--which seems like a good idea. However, I've watched LOTS and LOTS of cake shows now and have noticed that many of these cakes are tough (like homemade bread) and dryish. Is this necessary to support weight? I even noticed one decorator on "challenge" complaining his cake was too moist. Thanks in advance!!

10 replies
TexasSugar Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 5:01am
post #2 of 11

Most of the cakes you see on challenges are not about the taste. They are about being able to cut and carve and stack and do crazy things with. They bake them before they come and ship them to the challenge. They aren't fresh baked cakes you would feed your family.

kakeladi Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 12:08pm
post #3 of 11

Would you want to eat a dry, tough, tasteless but pretty cake? I don't think so.
It is helpful to bake the cake at least the day before decorating it but I have at times baked and decorated w/in hours when I had my shop.
I believe cakes should be moist and tender. They should taste as good (or better!) than they look icon_wink.gif

indydebi Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 1:27pm
post #4 of 11

If I had to choose between a good tasting cake OR a pretty decorated cake, I'd hang up my icing bags for good. It's definitely not an "either/or" deal.

The cake isn't what supports the upper tier. It's your support system. You can make a cake-shaped bottom tier out of 100% cool whip and if your support system is set up right, it will support the upper tiers.

forthwife Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 3:50pm
post #5 of 11

I can't tell you how glad I am that you guys feel the same way! I was begining to wonder if taste was unimportant in the decorating world. Does anyone else wonder about Duff's cakes? I know "Never a Frozen Cake", but when it takes time to bake and then 3 days to decorate...isn't it stale?

indydebi Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 4:02pm
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by forthwife

but when it takes time to bake and then 3 days to decorate...isn't it stale?




Cakes and baked goods are not as fragile as people seem to think (how old ARE those Oreos and that loaf of bread in your pantry? icon_confused.gif ). I ice and decorate on Thursday for a Saturday wedding. It's sitting out (because I don't refrigerate my cakes) for three days.

Our gramma kept leftover cake on a glass pedestal plate covered with a domed lid for days and we all ate it and luv'd it.

If you leave a plain baked cake just sitting on the counter, then yes it will get hard and stale. But once you ice it (BC or fondant), the cake itself is sealed .... the air cant' get to it and it doesnt' get hard and stale. The icing protects the cake ... much like the plastic wrap on the loaf of bread protects the bread.

dawncr Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 4:16pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

The cake isn't what supports the upper tier. It's your support system. You can make a cake-shaped bottom tier out of 100% cool whip and if your support system is set up right, it will support the upper tiers.




Another great quote for the IndyDebi advice column.

Another of my faves is, "I'll get the same exposure and advertising if you *pay* me for my cake as I will if I donate it."

amoos Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 4:47pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

You can make a cake-shaped bottom tier out of 100% cool whip and if your support system is set up right, it will support the upper tiers.




So I have a vision now of a "cake inthe clouds"!!! A cake held up by coolwhip!!!! OK So I not ANYWHERE good enough to make this but I think it would look soooo cool.....someone make it for me and send me a pic icon_smile.gif

Callyssa Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 4:56pm
post #9 of 11

I'm such a newbie myself that I question whether I should give any advice at all, but I will give my two cents, for what it's worth! What "I" am finding is that there are some ultra moist, tender, AND delicious recipes that work great, such as WASC, and others that seem to have trouble holding themselves up, let alone a second layer of cake. Those seem to always cause either that awful bulge around the sides, or sink somewhat in the middle (for me). I've been compensating by adding more icing to make them look level. I will absolutely NOT compromise quality for beauty, and I'll find a way to have both without always having to use WASC! I've even tried using different box mix flavors with the recipe for WASC and each different flavor seems to perform differently.
So, to answer your question, no, I don't think you have to compromise taste for looks, I just think you have to perform a lot of trial and error and see what works for you. And I am definitely a cake "freezer".....my personal opinion is that it does seem to make the cakes more moist, but for some recipes it makes them too wet and sticky. I've started binder of recipes to try, and those that I already have, and I've tested each recipe twice; once frozen and tested, and once not frozen and tested, then I make notes on the recipes to remind myself what I did, or didn't like about each. Hope this helps?

forthwife Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 10:42pm
post #10 of 11

Thanks everyone, you're awesome!!

JenniferMI Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 11:17pm
post #11 of 11

Yuppers, your support system is the key. You can use light cakes if the system is sturdy.

Jen icon_smile.gif

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