Question About Petit Fours

Decorating By southaustingirl Updated 10 Nov 2008 , 4:15pm by southaustingirl

southaustingirl Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 2:05am
post #1 of 13

Any feedback/advice/instruction will be greatly appreciated!!!

How do you ice your petit fours? With poured fondant? Do you use RBC? Are petit fours supposed to have a filling?

12 replies
Bijoudelanuit Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 2:23am
post #2 of 13

I've iced petit fours with poured fondant. I've never attempted it with RBC (rolled buttercream?)

They have 3 layers of cake and 2 layers of filling (a preserve or a buttercream). I top the 3rd layer of cake with a very thin layer of buttercream and a layer of marzipan before cutting and coating with the fondant.

kakeladi Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 11:45am
post #3 of 13

I prefere to use the injection method to fill themicon_smile.gif
Literal translation means 'little bite' so they must be small - about 1 1/2" cube.
I found covering w/rolled fondant the easiest way for me. I tried dipping them in choco but most of them broke and the choco gets full of crumbs (yes, even if the cake is fzn) icon_sad.gif
Good luck........these little babies are ver, Very, VERY time consuming. Be sure you charge enough!

cylstrial Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 2:04pm
post #4 of 13

[quote="Bijoudelanuit"]I've iced petit fours with poured fondant. I've never attempted it with RBC (rolled buttercream?)

Ok -- so I have a couple of questions.

What is poured fondant? I'm assuming it's just a goo-ier form of fondant that just pours out like ganache. Do you just smooth out the sides and then you are done with it?

cylstrial Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 2:07pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

I prefere to use the injection method to fill themicon_smile.gif
Literal translation means 'little bite' so they must be small - about 1 1/2" cube.
I found covering w/rolled fondant the easiest way for me. I tried dipping them in choco but most of them broke and the choco gets full of crumbs (yes, even if the cake is fzn) icon_sad.gif
Good luck........these little babies are ver, Very, VERY time consuming. Be sure you charge enough!




Sorry to post again! I wasn't sure how to post 2 quotes in one box.

Anyway, what is the injection method?

And last but not least, do you all bake petit fours in a special pan? Or do you just use a 9X13 and cut them into small squares?

Thanks so much for answering all my wacky questions..

and...I'm sorry to hi-jack your thread! It unleashed a bunch of questions that hopefully will help others as well.

Stina Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 2:27pm
post #6 of 13

I dip in summer coating which is just melted chocolate with some paramount crystals in it. You have to make sure that you use good chocolate and that it is not too old. Old chocolate will not melt into a nice "pouring" consistency. I have shaped them many different ways. Wilton has a cool silicone pan that is just little squares (they also have stars I think), and I have also just baked in a sheet pan and then cut into squares or diamonds. My trick is after I cut them and fill them I put a toothpick in them and then freeze. When my chocolate is melted I just pull them out of the freezer by the toothpick and dip away. It works for me, but everyone is different. I had no patience to cover each one with fondant. GOOD LUCK.

PinkZiab Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 12:44am
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

I prefere to use the injection method to fill themicon_smile.gif
Literal translation means 'little bite' so they must be small - about 1 1/2" cube.




Totally not trying to nitpick, lol, but I need to jump in here: Petit four actually translates to "little oven" and they are so named because back when wood and coal-fired brick ovens were used they were very labor intensive to keep hot and hard to control the termperature, therefore they did not want to "waste" and of the heat, so small cakes, cookies and other quick-baking, bite-sized treats were baked toward the end of the day as the ovens were in their cool-down process. Traditionally,petit four refers to any small (no more than 1-2 bites) dessert or even appetizer. There are generally three kinds:

Petit four glacés ("iced"), which include the type most Americans think of when talking about petits four (small cakes covered in poured fondant or frosting) but can also include$, small éclairs, and tartlets.

Petit four secs ("dry") are things like small cookies, baked meringues, macaroons, and puff pastries.

Petit four salé , which are bite-sized savory appetizers

kakeladi Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 1:18am
post #8 of 13

Injection method of filling cakes: Bake a cake no more than 2" deep. Choose a filling that is seedless/lump free; smooth.
Divide cake into 2" sections. Fill pastry bag fitted w/small round tip (I usually use a 3 or 4). In the center of each 2" section Poke tip into cake about 1/2 way up tip and squeeze bag a second or two. Remove tip. If you squeeze too hard/long the filling will ozz out icon_sad.gif

KlyKat Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 1:19am
post #9 of 13

LisaMS has a fabulous picture tutorial on her website/blog that's really easy to follow. HTH K'ly

joycile Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 1:35am
post #10 of 13

we cut frozen cake, fill it, then use a poured icing made of corn syrup, xxxsugar, and water. We put them on a rack placed over a pan, and pour the icing on. your cake must be frozen solid or you will get crumbs!

PinkZiab Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 1:52am
post #11 of 13

My preferred method for layered petits fours glaces is to bake an ultra thin sheet of cake (usually a full sheet pan). Cut that into quarters and spread three of of the quarters with jam (or whatever the preferred filling). Stack them all, obviously ending with the un-"jammed" layer. Wrap, and chill well (or freeze). Then cut that stacked cake into the appropriate size before enrobing and decorating.

cylstrial Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 1:35pm
post #12 of 13

Thank you all so much for sharing! You've all been so helpful! I think I might try them this week! If I do, I'll try to post a picture!

Thanks again!

southaustingirl Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 4:15pm
post #13 of 13

The injection method seems less time consuming than filling and stacking layers of cake.....kinda like when filling a cupcake.

Thanks for all the tips!!!!

I have not heard back from my potential customer so I may not get the opportunity to make these just yet. And if I do, based on the instructions, I definitely undercharged!!! $2.50 per petit four, decorated with a little bow (like a wrapped gift).

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