Tired Of Not Being Able To Level My Cakes!!

Decorating By Lucy0618 Updated 10 Nov 2008 , 9:24pm by leah_s

Lucy0618 Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 1:43am
post #1 of 23

Thank you for reading, but I have tried and tried many things from pipes...to straws...to wooden dowels, Ive tried scissors....saws...and sometimes all of them are just indifferent but it shows on my finished cakes. Do you guys use something or do something that levels your cakes perfectly? Please help, I had a angry bride see the inperfection and I had to refund her entire money because I believe it was my fault icon_cry.gif thank you everyone. icon_sad.gif

luz

22 replies
cakedesigner59 Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 1:51am
post #2 of 23

I'd like to hear the answer to this too. Although I've been making cakes for years, mine are never as level as the pros. I've used a tiny level, but still....the only tip I can give is to get down at eye-level and look at it that way. Also, sometimes you will notice that you won't even be able to tell it's not level...until you take a photo. For some reason, all the imperfections come out clearly in a photo, isn't that weird?

kakeladi Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 3:13am
post #3 of 23

Are your cake layers level to begin with??
Have you put enough batter into the pan so it b akes up high enough to level?
When cutting supports you find the highest spot on the cake (if there is one); push in one support (straw, dowel, whatever); mark that one at the icing line; cut all the other supports the same exact length.

Better yet! Use the SPS! They are already cut to the proper length. No guessing; no cutting, just push in and add plateicon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 3:53am
post #4 of 23

1) Level your cakes with an Agbay. (www.AgbayProducts.com)
2) Bake to the corect height.
3) Use SPS
4) Double check with a small level.

And you won't have problems.

BethHansen Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 4:13am
post #5 of 23

You might want to also check if your work table is level. If it isn't, your cake will never turn out level.

kimmypooh79 Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 10:47am
post #6 of 23

I gave up on my wilton levelers and just started using a bread knife. I level before take the cake out of the pan cutting around the top edge. My cakes have come out better this way. HTH

indydebi Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 1:27pm
post #7 of 23

Level the cakes while in the pan. If the cakes don't rise quite high enough, here's a neat trick I learned from CC'ers: Put cake cardboards in the pan, then put hte cake back into the pan. The 2-3 cardboards will have raised the cake high enough over the edge of the pan so that you can level it nice and flat and even.

If you're not using SPS, be sure your dowels are all cut the same length. Insert one dowel, mark it for cutting height, then cut the rest of the dowels the same height. Do NOT insert and mark each dowel separately. If you want to test for levelness BEFORE putting your next tier in place, put a cardboard or plastic cake plate on top of the dowels and use a level to check it.

Lucy0618 Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 1:58pm
post #8 of 23

well my cakes are leveled...but it's my stacking or my tiering that goes a little crooked once asembled.

Excuse the question...what's a sps?

cakedesigner59 Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 2:35pm
post #9 of 23

My cakes barely ever come over the top edge of the pan. If they dome a bit, I press them back down with a clean dish towel, so they are level with the pan. No cutting necessary. Must be done while the cake is still warm.

__Jamie__ Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 2:54pm
post #10 of 23

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html

Here is what SPS is, and Leahs instructions. Looks great, and I am going to get these very soon myself!

ladyonzlake Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 3:01pm
post #11 of 23

Yep, I love the SPS system but you have to make sure to bake or frost a little over 4" high when using them.

Istead of torting my cakes I've started baking the layers. I divide my batter into 3 pans and stack and frost. No more torting and a lot less crumbs especially for the chocolate cakes!

CakeWhizz Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 3:05pm
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

1) Level your cakes with an Agbay. (www.AgbayProducts.com)
2) Bake to the corect height.
3) Use SPS
4) Double check with a small level.

And you won't have problems.



Amen to that!

__Jamie__ Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 6:44pm
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyonzlake

Istead of torting my cakes I've started baking the layers. I divide my batter into 3 pans and stack and frost. No more torting and a lot less crumbs especially for the chocolate cakes!




That sounds like something I want to try. I hate the crumby mess from torting. Thanks for the tip!

Lucy0618 Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 6:40pm
post #14 of 23

question.....what if my cakes are higher than 4''? could it still work? with fillings and buttercream and fondant I estimate my cakes a littl over 4'' maybe 5'' the top layers wont sink in? And have that seam of the filling coming out? Thanks a bunch guys!!

Luz

__Jamie__ Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 7:06pm
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucy0618

question.....what if my cakes are higher than 4''? could it still work? with fillings and buttercream and fondant I estimate my cakes a littl over 4'' maybe 5'' the top layers wont sink in? And have that seam of the filling coming out? Thanks a bunch guys!!

Luz





Of course the top layers would sink in...all the way in until they hit the support system you put in. And if your cake is covered with fondant, the tier on top will sink in, tear your fondant, and pull up the bottom edges...yuch! Am I right? Makes sense to me...I wouldn't want to find out. icon_confused.gif

revel Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 7:15pm
post #16 of 23

Is there a guide somewhere that states how much batter should go into the pans? I'm having troubles getting my cakes 4"

__Jamie__ Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 7:17pm
post #17 of 23

Do you mean, 4" right out of the pan? Or after you torte, fill and ice?

revel Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 7:19pm
post #18 of 23

4" total. Is that how high they need to be to use the SPS? My cakes always end up being to short or to tall!

leah_s Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 8:18pm
post #19 of 23

SPS legs come in 4" and 5". (Other combinations and a 9" also, but for this discussion let's stick to the 4s and 5s.)

The idea is to bake, fill and ice the cake so that the tier is one of those heights. Wilton has a pretty good chart on their website about how much batter to put in the pans. If you've seen Indy's pics of her cakes coming out of the oven, they bake up just a bit over the top edge of the pan, so she can use the top of the pan as a cutting guide. Generally speaking - and this varies somewhat with different flavors of cake - you'll fill a pan 2/3 full. My experience is only with scratch cakes, as I don't use mixes, but I'd have to think that mixes would be the same 2/3 full.

It just sounds like you need to put more batter in the pans. Better to cut some off than come up short.

Cake scraps are yummo.

revel Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 8:23pm
post #20 of 23

OK so if i level my cakes with the top on the pan add filling, buttercream and fondant that will give me the height for the SPS?

I have a tiered cake to do this weekend i'll try this! Thanks!

leah_s Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 8:35pm
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by revel

OK so if i level my cakes with the top on the pan add filling, buttercream and fondant that will give me the height for the SPS?

I have a tiered cake to do this weekend i'll try this! Thanks!




I'm just saying that's the way Indy bakes her cakes. (And Indy rocks.) That's not what I do.

As I so often say, let's have fun with math.
If you have 2 layers, each 2" tall, + 1/4" filling, plus a skim of buttercream, and then 1/4" of fondant, your tier is going to be taller than 4". The SPS legs will accomodate a bit higher than 4", say 4.25".

You probably will have to level your cake to account for the height of your filling. Or fillings if you torte.

I torte my layers to 7/8". That's just the way I do it.

Your mileage may vary.

tootie0809 Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 8:46pm
post #22 of 23

One word....Agbay. It's changed my life when it comes to leveling cakes. Pricey, but sooooooo worth the money!

leah_s Posted 10 Nov 2008 , 9:24pm
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tootie0809

One word....Agbay. It's changed my life when it comes to leveling cakes. Pricey, but sooooooo worth the money!




Seriously, tootie. I said that back on page 1 of this thread. Agbay is totaly, absolutely, positively worth the price. It changes your cake-life.

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