Apathetic Americans P*** Me Off!!!

Lounge By barbaranoel Updated 16 Nov 2008 , 7:18pm by 7yyrt

barbaranoel Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 2:49am
post #1 of 43

I am a Presiding Judge for my precinct. I have been doing this for four years now.

The day started out with a bang - for 6 hrs we had 2+ hr wait going on. People started to line up at 5:30am and our lines didn't die down til after 12. They were saying up to 30% voted before today. By my "rough" estimations over 70% turnout today - that's AWESOME!

Only a couple of crappy people.

What's got my goat is the people who don't do anything. I talked to people in the last couple of days "no, I don't know who I'm voting for" " I don't care" .

C'mon FOLKS! It's your duty to vote. It's your job to find out what's going on. If you don't, if you don't like what is going on and you don't do anything about it, THEN SIT DOWN AND SHUT UP!

I talked to a guy from Mexico today. He was at the polls with a friend today while his friend voted. He was in awe with the whole process. He is literally counting down the days to til he becomes a citizen and is able to vote.

That is what our system is about. This is your chance to have your voice heard, your chance to have a say in your future. The pride I saw on his face when he talked about getting his citizenship and voting. This is what more of our people need to feel.

I don't care if you are Republican, Democrat or Independant - VOTE. That's what I look for. I am happy with the turnout today but really, too many people only vote Presidential races but really everything counts. Every Election, every vote.

Ok, I am getting off my soap box now. I just spent 16 hrs at the polls. And trust me, I don't do it for the money. I do it because I couldn't sit around anymore bitching and waiting for someone else to make decisions.

Besides, I like throwing off the average age of a poll worker icon_wink.gif

42 replies
banba Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 10:10am
post #2 of 43

Here Here! Well said. It is everyones civil duty to vote. You have no right to complain if you do not vote!

Do people that do not vote just don't want to have a voice?

jammjenks Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 1:30pm
post #3 of 43

I registered to vote when I was 18 and have voted each time since then. DH on the other hand just registered this year at age 33. I am ashamed to admit, but the reason he always gave for not registering is because he didn't want to be selected for jury duty. Supposedly that's how you get picked for it, or at least that's what he was told. I always told him if he doesn't vote then he has no reason to complain. I agree that we as voters (no matter the party) need to educate ourselves about our local politicians as well as the national ones. It is our duty....people have died to afford us that right.

TC123 Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 1:40pm
post #4 of 43

I agree that it's important to vote. However, if people do not have, or have not taken, the time to get to know the candidates and understand what their platforms are, then I think they just don't know who to vote for... So they don't... I agree, though, that this group of people should not compain if they are displeased in any way with the results and/or accomplishments of our elected officials. JMHO. icon_smile.gif

KKC Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 1:43pm
post #5 of 43

I hear ya! I took my son with me to vote and i was basically showing him how its done...he said 'Mommy I can't wait until i get bigger so that i can vote' he's only 7 so i'm really glad that he knows what he has to look forward to when he turns 18. This is the life...being able to have your voice heard!

KASCARLETT Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 3:19pm
post #6 of 43

I voted. But I am wondering - WHY? There were at least 6 states who's votes weren't even counted before they announced who the president was. Shouldn't everyone have a say? It just bums me out and if I was in one of those states - I would think (as I am now) why even waste my time? It's all polictical anyway - the winning candidate is decided even before election day.

KKC Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 3:43pm
post #7 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by KASCARLETT

I voted. But I am wondering - WHY? There were at least 6 states who's votes weren't even counted before they announced who the president was. Shouldn't everyone have a say? It just bums me out and if I was in one of those states - I would think (as I am now) why even waste my time? It's all polictical anyway - the winning candidate is decided even before election day.


Yeah that sucks. What part of Alabama are you from? About 70% of my family lives in Alabama (Union Springs, Montgomery & Birmingham).

MosMom Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 6:07pm
post #8 of 43

We are such a fortunate country to be able to vote and have it count. I was happy to see such a large turnout of young voters. Hopefully, they are just beginning a lifetime habit and voting numbers will continue to rise instead of decline.

KoryAK Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 6:14pm
post #9 of 43

Well, I'm in Alaska so they were announcing the winner by 7:30 ish our time... and the polls hadn't even closed yet. It isn't a reason to get you down. It's not like they don't care about your vote, it's just that the lead was so large that they knew soon. Like if a guy was a mile ahead in a marathon... doesn't mean you should pout about it.

myslady Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 7:38pm
post #10 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by KASCARLETT

I voted. But I am wondering - WHY? There were at least 6 states who's votes weren't even counted before they announced who the president was. Shouldn't everyone have a say? It just bums me out and if I was in one of those states - I would think (as I am now) why even waste my time? It's all polictical anyway - the winning candidate is decided even before election day.




The president is chosen by the number of electoral votes received. The people determine who the electoral votes go to.

The media was able to announce who won before all states reported in due to Obama gaining the required number of electoral votes needed to become President.

mkolmar Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 9:04pm
post #11 of 43

This is one of my pet peeves. The members of my family that complain the most about who's in office are the one's who are in their 40's -60's and have never even registered. -My SIL got a paid day off of work (She works for Ford) and she didn't even vote because she didn't register.

I took my 5 year old with me to vote. I even let her feed my ballot into the machine. I hope even if my kids vote differently than what I do that they at least vote.

barbaranoel Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 10:55pm
post #12 of 43

My 5th grade son is excited to be able to vote one day and he is looking forward to volunteering at the polls every year.

He was so mad because at school they had a mock vote and most of the kids in his class didn't have a clue as to who they were going to vote for. He felt everyone should know. I was disappointed in the school for not talking about the candidates and their issues before the vote.

My mom told me a couple of weeks ago that she was going to vote for Obama ( completely stunned me coming from a die hard republican )
but then late monday night she informs me she never mailed in her absentee ballot because she didn't want people to yell at her for who she voted for icon_confused.gif

Now I am yelling at her for not voting at all.

Barb

Curtsmin24 Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 6:09am
post #13 of 43

I was shocked at how many young people came out to vote. The lines were so long and we waited 2 1/2 hours to vote. There was an older man with his wife who had alzheimers and she even went to vote. I think that everyone that voted, regardless of who they voted for, should be proud of themselves. We hit a record number of voters in a decade. That is incredible!

Quote:
Quote:

but then late monday night she informs me she never mailed in her absentee ballot because she didn't want people to yell at her for who she voted for



I believe a lot of people didn't want to be judged because of who they were voting for. I never ask and never tell because I personally think it is something that always stirs up an argument of some nature but, I know that my mother and brother didn't vote because she was in the hospital and my brother just moved out here so he wasn't registered in this state and it was too late to get an absentee ballot. But kudos thumbs_up.gif to all who did!

KKC Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 12:53am
post #14 of 43

I am so surprised and so happy that there were alot of young people who voted. My son is in 2nd grade and his teacher was basically teaching them about the election but i didn't like how she was going about teaching the kids. (Where we live about 80% of the community was going for McCain)My son came home one day and said "Mommy my teacher said that everyone should vote for Obama because McCain sucks" I was so shocked that this teacher who is suppose to be a professional was telling that to these very impressionable children. I had to have a conference with her to let her know that those type of opinions should not be voiced to my son.

Curtsmin24 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 3:02am
post #15 of 43
Quote:
Quote:

"Mommy my teacher said that everyone should vote for Obama because McCain sucks" I was so shocked that this teacher who is suppose to be a professional was telling that to these very impressionable children. I had to have a conference with her to let her know that those type of opinions should not be voiced to my son.




I agree. My nephew had a similar situation and I told him to keep listening in school and pay attention and read books because when he gets older the more you know the better it is for you to make decisions and he said that he didn't like someone because his friend told him it wasn't right. I said researching helps because not all teachers know everything (nobody really does, it's too much info!!!)I told him that it is important to vote and know your facts so that you can make a logical decision. I told him to look at how much society has changed over the years and that at one point women weren't allowed to vote and we talked a little bit about segragation and different historical things that changed what we are doing in the world now. He was in awe. icon_smile.gif He said wow, you're smart and I said yes, because I paid attention in school and I still educate myself now because I like to know about what's going on and why things happened and doing the research myself helps me get accurate information. I also told him about halloween and a lot of other holidays and how much tradition has changed and why some people don't celebrate certain hollidays also. He said he was going to pay more attention so that he could be smart like me. thumbs_up.gif

kbak37 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 4:43am
post #16 of 43

I have to agree about the votes not counting. I live in Wasilla, Alaska and as the last 25 seconds counted down to the polls closing in California the news was calling the election for Obama. Who won or lost is not the point..I was sick to my stomach because my 4 daughters asked why the election was called when not all the votes have been counted..and our polls were still open. They said it wasnt fair. All I could say was that he reached the electoral needed and that was that. My seventeen year old said she will not vote because it is a clear waste of time.

Its all said and done, and is a memorable election....and I am thrilled Sarah is back as my govenor!

redpanda Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 5:54am
post #17 of 43

Maybe you can explain it this way:

Let's say I were to bake a cake and put a special prize in one of the pieces of cake. The cake is cut into 10 slices, and you have a group of 10 children who can have a piece. Everyone picks their piece of cake right away (or with voting picks where they live), but each child must eat his or hear piece of cake in age order (have polls close at 8 p.m. local time). Thus, the oldest child gets to eat her piece and see if the prize is there. The next oldest then gets to eat, too, and so on. It is possible that the prize will be found before the youngest child has eaten his or her piece.

Does that mean that she has no reason to eat the cake, that eating cake is a waste of time? Absolutely not! Eating cake and voting are both privileges, and should not be taken lightly. While in this election, there were enough electoral votes for Obama to win before the polls closed in Alaska, in another election it is very possible that the race will be so close that Alaska's electoral votes will be the deciding factor in the election.

Besides, it is very rare, at least everywhere I have lived, for elections to be only for President. Usually, there are local offices to be filled, as well. If you choose not to vote simply because your vote for President won't be the deciding factor, you are also giving up your voice with regards to local government.

Does this make sense?

kbak37 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 6:09am
post #18 of 43

It does make sense..absolutley. I do encourage my girls to vote when they get to that age....I hope they do exercise that right. Im thinking they are taking it a bit personal since they know the Palin kids and they feel defeated.
I appreciate your take and will read it to my girls. Thank you!

ElectricCook Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 2:06pm
post #19 of 43

My husband and I took my son (8 yrs old) to vote with us Tuesday morning. My son was very excited that he go to vote 2xs that day. My husband and I both let him pull the levers.

We always vote in all the elections local and national. My son has come into the voting both wih us since he has been born. I have taught my son how to use the voting booth and how to pull down all the levers individually. I do this so that when he is 18 he will be a old pro in the voting both and not need help when it is his turn.

I was proud to see all of the young people voting and excited to vote for the first time.

MosMom Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 2:09pm
post #20 of 43

kbak,

I didn't vote for McCain/Palin but I feel bad that Palin seems to be thrown under the bus in this election. There are a number of reasons why McCain's campaign did not prevail and Palin is part of a bigger puzzle. It is shameful that aides and staffers are releasing stories and I have a hard time believing them. Trying to demean her by saying she was too stupid to know Africa is a continent. Well, I just don't buy it.

Do remind your daughters though that without voting they wouldn't have Sarah Palin as their governor. Voting is still very important even when your candidate doesn't win. Maybe take some time to explain exactly how the electoral college works. Their vote still matters! icon_smile.gif Actually, some might say those smaller elections that many people often ignore are often more important than the presidential election!

Mike1394 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 3:02pm
post #21 of 43

Your vote in the Pres. election doesn't count. There is no where at all in the constitution that says the E college has to vote in line with the popular vote. The Electors can vote anyway they prefer. Of course that being said. To become an Elector you have to know someone that knows someone. There is no qualification to become an Elector.

Mike

Ironbaker Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 3:47pm
post #22 of 43

Mike I wondered about that - so have any of the electors ever NOT voted in the way of the popular vote for their state? I believe they "pledge" to go a certain way beforehand, correct?

Redpanda - that was an excellent explanation!

kbak37, I hope your girls feel better about it all soon. Your state is one of those still in contention for the Senate race, right? That's why their votes count. The Senate is just as important. thumbs_up.gif

Mike1394 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 3:52pm
post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironbaker

Mike I wondered about that - so have any of the electors ever NOT voted in the way of the popular vote for their state? I believe they "pledge" to go a certain way beforehand, correct?




That I'm not sure about. I "think" it is the head of each party for the respective state that chooses the Electors.

Mike

kbak37 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 3:53pm
post #24 of 43

Mike,

I was explaining how the electoral college worked to a British gal that I work with because she was clueless as well as fascinated with our process. I pulled an explanation up on the internet for her and it did catch my eye that the electors do not have to vote the will of the voters, but have done so 99% of the time. And you are correct that nothing stops them from voting however they wish and there are no qualifications to be an elector. It is amazing that in this day and age we cant have a more streamlined and difficult process to become and elector.

Mosmom,

Thank you for not buying into all the harsh stories about Sarah. I have met her, I have had lunch with her sister and mom and my kids go to school with and (know) her kids when they are in town. Her parents and her home are less than 5 miles from me and we always see the family out and about. I feel personally that she may not have been 100% ready for the office, but I can tell you she has done wonderful things for this state and has a true passion for doing the right thing. When she was pregnant with Trig, a radio station insisted on giving her a baby shower. She agreed, but with the understanding that every gift that she received went directly to charity. Obama should consider her for his energy cabinet he wants to form..she knows what she is doing!

MosMom Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 3:54pm
post #25 of 43

That isn't quite true Mike. Your vote DOES count in that electors are chosen for each state based on votes cast for the presidential election. That elector can cast their ballot for either side but generally will stick to their side and in some states is required to. When you vote, you are actually voting for your candidate's electors. This is why in some states if you choose to write-in your candidate you are also required to write-in the name/s of candidates for electors.

So, your vote does count...just in an indirect manner. Hence, the indirect election.

Swing states matter and that is why presidential candidates concentrate on these states. Voter turnout does matter in these states and that is why candidates fight so hard for these states.

In 2000, Florida was a battleground state and this is why the actual popular vote was so important and there was such a post election fight.

<-- nerd

Mike1394 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 4:01pm
post #26 of 43

Kbak, I friend of mine lives in Juneau. She hsa met Mrs. palin a # of times in fact thier lids have played together. From what she has told me yes, Mrs. Palin is a very nice lady.

Mike1394 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 4:07pm
post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by MosMom

That isn't quite true Mike. Your vote DOES count in that electors are chosen for each state based on votes cast for the presidential election. That elector can cast their ballot for either side but generally will stick to their side and in some states is required to. When you vote, you are actually voting for your candidate's electors. This is why in some states if you choose to write-in your candidate you are also required to write-in the name/s of candidates for electors.




Yes, true but there is nothing binding holding them to that postition. Other then wanting to keep your job as an Elector. I just think it is a totally antiquated system that needs overhauling. The whole premise of the Electorial College was so the smaller population stated had a say. At the time 99% of the population was in 3-4 states. So yes it made sense, sort of.

Has anyone ever met an Elector? Not me, just curious

Mike

kbak37 Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 4:09pm
post #28 of 43

Ironbaker,

I have to be honest and say that when I went in to vote, I knew that my vote for Mccain was not going to make a difference, and I in my head had accepted that. I have to admit that I voted for Stevens, and I will tell you why.

I agree that if in fact Ted Stevens did knowingly accepted those gifts and did not report them, then he should suffer the consequences under the law and lose his spot in the senate. Ted Stevens has worked his butt off for this state for a good portion of his life and this state is better for it. To be honest..no one cared about Alaska before Sarah was put in the spotlight..heck we are not even part of the national weather forecast!
He is a powerful man in the senate and that is good for our state. I will take him any day over Mark Begich.

Having said all that, if Stevens does get the boot, I would love to see Sarah go for his seat. I dont know if she will..she is tough, but the media will not let up on her and that has to bother her on some level.

Anyhoo..thanks for all the support and explanations..thats why I love this site..no place else can we work a cake into an explantation of the electoral college..and I love it! My kids will be fine it is a great lesson in how elections work.

MosMom Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 4:14pm
post #29 of 43

It wasn't just the fair shake idea that brought about the electoral college, it was that the founding fathers didn't quite believe their citizens were smart enough to vote properly.

I agree, I think since the majority of Americans can READ...we should take another look at our election system. icon_wink.gif

mbelgard Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 6:25pm
post #30 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by MosMom

It wasn't just the fair shake idea that brought about the electoral college, it was that the founding fathers didn't quite believe their citizens were smart enough to vote properly.

I agree, I think since the majority of Americans can READ...we should take another look at our election system. icon_wink.gif




A change might help get people to the polls especially in states that aren't swing states. It's got to be far more motivating to vote in say Iowa or Florida where the vote can make a change than in Alabama or North Dakota.

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