Need Help From Food Allergies Expert! Wheat Nut & Soy F

Baking By nefgaby Updated 9 Nov 2008 , 3:20am by nefgaby

nefgaby Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 1:58am
post #1 of 12

Hi!!! icon_smile.gif

I had a request today for Wheat, Nut (all nuts including peanuts) and Soy Free Sugar Cookies. I don't know if this is even possible as I have very little knowledge on food allergies.
Of course, I googled it and this is what I found:

Recipe for sugar cookies
1 1/2 cups brown rice flour
1/2 cup tapioca starch
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1 Teaspoon Baking Powder (wheat free?, someone wrote on the same forum I found this recipe at)
1 Teaspoon Vanilla
1 Cup Sugar
1/2 Cup Butter, Softened
2 Eggs, beaten

In a medium size bowl, mix brown rice flour, tapioca starch, salt, and baking powder. Blend well and set aside. In a mixing bowl, cream Butter, and slowly add sugar and cream until light and fluffy. Add the two beaten Eggs and Vanilla and blend again. Add Flour mixture and mix until mixture pulls away from the side of the bowl. Place cookie dough in waxed paper (rolled it like a log) and chill in the refrigerator for several hours. When the dough is chilled, you can either cut it with cookie cutters or slice it to make round cookies.

Bake on an un-greased cookie sheet at 350 degrees. Let them cool first, before taking off of the cookie sheet. This reduces crumbling. Also use a spatula, to remove the cookies from the pan.


So please excuse my ignorace and help me!!! I really want to find a good recipe and be 100% sure I will not harm the little girl who these cookies are for.

I would really appreciate any info and advice, also, regarding the rest of ingredients, just make sure everything is safe, as some ingredients are processed with wheat (found out quacker oats are procesed with wheat!) as is baking powder. Also were do I buy brown rice flour, wheat free baking powder and tapioca starch???

Thanks again!!!! thumbs_up.gif

11 replies
282513 Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 2:10am
post #2 of 12

Hi, My friends little boy has these allergies too and all i can say is......
It will be very expensive to make let alone buy. icon_eek.gif You may be able to buy a mix that excludes the allergens from a special site. icon_wink.gif Allergies are dangerous when the proper precautions are not taken. Your prep area must also be contaminent free. Reactions can occur from improperly cleaned utensils and surfaces as well as foods. I know I sound a bit over the top but it is really serious and I would hate for something to happen. HTH

FullMoonRanch Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 2:14am
post #3 of 12

Hi Gaby,

You can try Whole Foods for the rice flour, tapioca starch, and wheat free baking powder or maybe a health food store. I have a dairy, egg, nut allergic child and have found they carry some of the more unusual ingredients. Good luck!

Kathy

nefgaby Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 2:52am
post #4 of 12

Hi 282513, thanks for your advice, I had already taken that under consideration, I also have a friend whose son is allergic to peanuts (and peanuts only) and when baking for him I have sterilize everything!!! Thanks again!

FullMoon, thanks and welcome to CC! I will try Whole Foods, great idea!

Thanks again to both!

Would love to know if anybody else has any other advice?!?!?!

nefgaby Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 7:10pm
post #5 of 12

No one else??? icon_sad.gif Pleeeeeeease!!!!!

282513 Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 7:30pm
post #6 of 12

Do you have a mustard seed market near you? They always have varieties of healthy items. Another friend of mine was saying that Krogers have actually a large selection. Sorry I can't help more. Did you google the foods you need and see if stores come up?

Joyful1216 Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 9:05pm
post #7 of 12

I have a friend recently diagnosed with celiac, so I've been reading on gluten-free recipes but I've not tried any of the wheat-free yet. The one thing I remember when reading is that while the brown rice flour is healthier, it can be a little gritty. The white rice flour is supposed to make a for a lighter product (again I've not tried this, but it makes sense to me the same difference in ww and ap flour).

I've had a tough time finding tapioca flour here, so I've been looking online. Amazon carries, but Barry Farms seems to have the best deals. I've not ordered yet, though, so I can't say anything about the product or timeliness in shipping
http://www.barryfarm.com/flours.htm

Here's a copy of 'homemade' baking powder just in case it's tough to find some gluten-free http://www.celiac.com/articles/510/1/Baking-Powder-Gluten-Free/Page1.html

nefgaby Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 4:12am
post #8 of 12

Thanks Joyful!!! Thank you for all the links and suggestions!!!!!

Jayde Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 3:44pm
post #9 of 12

Here are a couple of things that I hope will help.

Bob's Red Mill, you can usually find him in the specialty flours section of your local grocery, BUT he is much much cheaper online if you have the time to wait for shipping.

http://www.bobsredmill.com/home.php

This site has AMAZING sugar cookies! They are sooo simple, but I dont buy their special flour crap. I will have to go home and look up my substitutions, but I promise I will do that and post them. You basically replace the expensive flour that they tell you to use with a specific mixture of Bob's Red Mill specialty flours. Then follow all the rest of the instructions just like in the recipe.

http://www.glutenfreeflour.com/recipes.asp

A very good recipe book for lots of different baked goods, using gluten free recipes.
The Best-Ever Wheat and Gluten Free Baking Book

A note on cross contamination:

I have celiac disease. I use the same pans, the same pots, and eat off of the same dishes as my family. They are not gluten free (my family that is). I have 2 small children that need those nutrients, so I do not make them adhere to MY diet. I am careful about cross contamination though. All of my dishes are washed in a dish washer with the sanitation setting on. That means that the water that is being used is above 200 degrees. Once the dishes are done, I use a bleach/water solution to rinse my dishes. I give them one final rinse with super hot water, and then dry and put away. This gets rid of traces of gluten.

HTH

Jayde Posted 7 Nov 2008 , 4:04pm
post #10 of 12

I forgot to add that if you are planning on baking gluten free long term, and want to continually make gluten free recipes, and this is not a one shot deal, please consider buying a GF flour mix in bulk.

It is sooo much cheaper!!
It is interchangeable for ANY type of flour (except cake flour, which has different additives) in any recipe! Whole wheat flour, all purpose flour, etc.
Did I meantion how much cheaper it is?? icon_smile.gif

http://www.domatalivingflour.com/product/903005-15FL

This is where I buy mine. For home use mostly, but I do keep one, just in case I get a customer who has gluten allergies.

Joyful1216 Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 12:08am
post #11 of 12

Thanks for all the information, Jayde! The flour mix is a lot cheaper. And thanks for sharing your process for sanitizing, I was wondering what would be ok. I'm looking forward to trying the sugar cookies!

I have another question for you icon_smile.gif. My friend's mentioned that the gluten free baked good she's purchased (like oreo style cookies) have an odd aftertaste. Have you had a similar experience? Are there certain ingredients to avoid (like certain gums)?

nefgaby Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 3:20am
post #12 of 12

Thanks Jayde!!! I don't plan on baking gluten-free long term, just super special orders of "special"customers. I was able to find brown rice flour locally, also gluten-free baking powder. The only thing I had trouble with is the tapioca starch, I only found flour, is that the same?

Also, if I want to decorate with fondant, I found out that fondx (which is what I use) has soy oils, so I can not use it. Satin Ice does not list any soy on their ingredients label ... any thoughts?

I will call Satin Ice on Monday but was curious if you had any info ... Thanks again for all your help!

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