Break From Traditional Decorators Icing

Decorating By CakeInfatuation Updated 9 Nov 2008 , 9:02pm by CakeInfatuation

CakeInfatuation Posted 4 Nov 2008 , 1:47pm
post #1 of 27

When I was a kid my aunt had a recipe for white icing that I thought was soooo good I was a 14 year old that asked for a recipe. I haven't made it in YEARS because it had flour in it and I kept getting lumpy icing. ha ha I'm a much better cook these days and know how to make a white sauce without lumps (Praise the Lord!!) and I'm thinking I'm going to try again.

Before I make this icing I wanted to know if any of you have used an icing that had flour in it to ice cakes? I've found a few online and one of the ones I found says that it is a "decorator icing".

I'd really like some feedback. WHY am I searching for an alternate recipe? Simply put... I HATE BUTTERCREAM. It's too heavy and way to cavity sweet for me. I really like a lighter feeling icing. Ideally, I'd have buckets of Rich's Bettercream to work with. But... not happening. So... If I can find an icing I can decorate with (basically cover the cake in and put between the layers and NOT have the layers slide around), then I'm a happy woman. I really prefer fondant decorating so I don't care about piping a rose.

SMBC and IMBC are both very expensive with all the egg whites and they don't hold up well. I LOVE the flavor, but the stress for me, isn't worth it. I can't get it thick enough to not slide around.

Here's my Aunt's Recipe:

1 cup milk
1/2 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 cup sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup crisco

Cook flour, salt, and milk until thick like white sauce. Let cool.
Cream together sugar and shortening till light and fluffy.
Add cooled sauce and vanilla. Beat till stiff.

--------

Cake Decorators Icing
Basic Recipe:
By Marjorie Geddes

1 cup of flour
1 cup of shortening
1/2 tsp of salt
1/2 cup of water
- icing sugar

Mix flour and shortening till fluffy and add salt. Add water a little at a time mixing after each addition. Add icing sugar a little at a time until desired consistency is achieved.

26 replies
JanH Posted 4 Nov 2008 , 5:23pm
post #2 of 27

There are comments on cooked pudding frostings in this thread:
(As well as other recipes.)

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-6011626-.html

HTH

kakeladi Posted 4 Nov 2008 , 5:57pm
post #3 of 27

Yes, that is sometimes called White Mountain Icing; and a few others I can't think of right now.

Winter1979 Posted 4 Nov 2008 , 6:04pm
post #4 of 27

Here is my mom's favorite recipe, she used this for my sister's wedding cake and everyone loved it.

Wedding Cake Frosting
3/4 c AP flour
3/4 c water
1 c crisco
1 tsp salt
3 tsp vanilla
7-8 c powdered sugar

Mix all together til smooth.

calivettie Posted 4 Nov 2008 , 6:11pm
post #5 of 27

Hey Shill,
thanks for the recipes... but unfortunately i am not as experienced in the kitchen and I still get lumpy frosting when trying recipes similar to these. What is the trick??? I would love to try these as having a less sweet frosting is great!!!

TIA

CakeInfatuation Posted 4 Nov 2008 , 6:51pm
post #6 of 27

Take your flour and water or flour and milk and while the liquid is still cold, put it in a container with a lid and SHAKE SHAKE SHAKE. If you mix the flour with cold liquid then put it in your pan to heat, you should be able to avoid lumps. icon_smile.gif

tthardy78 Posted 4 Nov 2008 , 7:26pm
post #7 of 27

Does anyone know how easy this is to smooth on a cake and make decorations?

pbeckwith Posted 4 Nov 2008 , 7:52pm
post #8 of 27

I use this recipe for the filling in my ladylocks and alot of times filling for cakes with a little peanut butter added or a little marshmallow. I use a whisk to blend the flour and milk and very rarely have any lumps.

rocketmom1985 Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 3:04am
post #9 of 27

I used this recipe for a class practice cake about three weeks ago. The frosting was delish and not hard at all to make. I did press the cooled flour mixture thru a sieve to make sure there were no lumps. This icing has a very soft and silky texture and like I said, very tasty. It does not crust, at least mine didn't. I used this to fill and frost then added the standard bc for my decoating stuff. This reminded me of a recipe I have used in the past on my Easter Lamb cakes, it is I think like the Swiss or Italian buttercreme where you make the sugar syrup and add to the butter. I liked it, dh loves the yuck practice stuff from the shortening. Go figure.

hugs,

CakeInfatuation Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 3:07am
post #10 of 27

Well I made my Aunts Recipe. The flavor is fantastic, the texture is very much like SMBC or IMBC. The biggest difference I think is that it appears more stable.

I'm all done and it is in the fridge until I make the cake on Friday. Until then.... I'll update how it goes when I frost the cake. I'm hoping the fridge firms it up a bit so it is a little stiffer. I think it will be really easy to ice with it but to cover with fondant????? Not so sure about that.

superstar Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 12:20am
post #11 of 27

So looking forward to seeing the cake. I am going to try this recipe, it sounds great. Thanks for sharing.

arosstx Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 12:35am
post #12 of 27

It will be interesting to know whether or not this icing of yours firms up any in the refrigerator. There's nothing in the recipe that naturally hardens (like butter) when exposed to cold. I hope you post some results!

Amia Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 12:40am
post #13 of 27

That sounds just like the traditional cooked frosting I use on red velvet cake, except that my recipe calls for butter instead of shortening (and no salt). I'll have to try yours. If it's as good as my recipe, but more stable, then I might've found a new icing too! icon_smile.gif

Honeychild Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 12:58am
post #14 of 27

This sounds really good Shill. Are you using regular granulated sugar and if so, is the texture grainy at all?

Win Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 1:21am
post #15 of 27

Amy, I agree, it is the same as the traditional (so many think cream cheese is "traditional") cooked frosting used on Red Velvet Cake. Southern style is traditionally the butter version, not the Crisco. Recently, I had been researching other Red Velvet recipes and noticed the Crisco version of the cooked frosting and had put it on my "to try" list. I'm glad this post popped up. It is such a yummy, unique flavored frosting. I love it!

Amia Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 1:24am
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

Amy, I agree, it is the same as the traditional (so many think cream cheese is "traditional") cooked frosting used on Red Velvet Cake. Southern style is traditionally the butter version, not the Crisco. Recently, I had been researching other Red Velvet recipes and noticed the Crisco version of the cooked frosting and had put it on my "to try" list. I'm glad this post popped up. It is such a yummy, unique flavored frosting. I love it!




Yep, so many are just horribly misinformed. icon_wink.gif The cooked frosting is soo much better...it's the only icing I can eat by the spoonful!

mclaren Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 9:22am
post #17 of 27

hi everyone,

i've read somewhere (i tried hard, but can't recall where), the cooked frosting will taste fantastic on the day it is made, but come the next day, it will taste like flour..

i've made this once, it was delicious, but since the cake was gone the same day, i couldn't know whether the point above is a fact or a myth.

anyone can share their experience? thanks.

Ursula40 Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 9:57am
post #18 of 27

What I would love to know, does it crust at all? How does the fondant hold up on it? Will it disolve the fondant?

CakeInfatuation Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 2:09pm
post #19 of 27

Haven't put it on the cake yet BUT I did stick it in the fridge and smear some on toffee chocolate chip cookies I made yesterday to give it a "taste test".

So far... it didn't harden it is so soft and creamy. Definitely YUMMY! I only made one batch and it isn't going to be enough so I need to make a 2nd batch. I'm going to do the 2nd batch and cook my white sauce a little longer this time till it gets thicker. I want a stiffer frosting and think that if I get a thicker white sauce, I'll be in better shape.

As far as the stability... PERFECT!!! Taste is so light. Not grainy or floury at all. For different flavors... I'm wondering if you can replace the milk for flavored coffee creamers. And of course you could add different extracts. I just added vanilla. Off the spoon it almost has a marshmallow taste. But it has the texture of IMBC without falling apart.

I can't understand the recipes that call for flour and don't say anything about cooking. You have to cook the flour to avoid the grainy texture.

CakeInfatuation Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 5:46am
post #20 of 27

Hooray!!! It's done!!!

I used the boiled flour icing. Here's the link to the finished cake.

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1285455&done=1

kakeladi Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 5:11pm
post #21 of 27

And this cake is iced w/boiled icing?????
No wayicon_smile.gif Is it the crumb coat under fondant?

CakeInfatuation Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 5:16pm
post #22 of 27

Yep.. the icing is under the fondant. icon_smile.gif NO WAY would I be able to get that look with boiled icing. ha ha It's too slippery and sticky.

superstar Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 9:17pm
post #23 of 27

shill, did it get thicker by cooking the white sauce longer & did it taste as good after standing for a long period as it did when you first made it? Your cake is absolutely fantastic, was this icing easy to cover with the fondant? Sorry so many questions LOL.

GI Posted 8 Nov 2008 , 10:35pm
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mclaren

hi everyone,

i've read somewhere (i tried hard, but can't recall where), the cooked frosting will taste fantastic on the day it is made, but come the next day, it will taste like flour..

i've made this once, it was delicious, but since the cake was gone the same day, i couldn't know whether the point above is a fact or a myth.

anyone can share their experience? thanks.




I made the cooked flour/milk recipe and put it away in fridge. (Kind of forgot..heh heh icon_redface.gif ) A few days later, took it out, ate some & had family try some, they said it tasted "custard-ey" and "flour-ey". I'd probably use it for the Red Velvet as long as it got all ate that day.

I used Buttercream Dream with Sugarshack's Wedding Bouquet on the big red velvet cake heart-shape in my pix and the cake didn't get all ate up. (And not one person tossed their cake, either! They just had a lot!!) So they froze pieces in the freezer. 3-4 mo later, they were eating it and it was just as good if not better than the day it was ate! Gave myself a double thumbs up on that one! thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif Whew! icon_biggrin.gif

CakeInfatuation Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 4:19am
post #25 of 27

Okay... here's the report.

The party was this evening. They absolutely LOVED the cake. My friend said that she liked this icing better than the IMBC/SMBC can't remember which it was that I used on my July 4th cake.


I also was able to make a very nice stable filling for the cake using my aunt's recipe as the base. To the original icing recipe I scooped out about 2 cups and then added 1/4 cup of cocoa powder, 1 cup powdered sugar, and 1/4 cup melted semi sweet chocolate chips. It was the perfect "glue/filling" for a layered cake. She said "I don't know what you had between those layers but it was awesome!".

So hooray for fondant covered cakes with a cooked flour icing under the fondant! I've found my icing for when I don't want to do buttercream. Hooray!!!

GI Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 8:19pm
post #26 of 27

Glad it worked out! so what cake flavor and also did you use the "decorator" icing, too? Or just your aunt's recipe plus your filling you said here?

CakeInfatuation Posted 9 Nov 2008 , 9:02pm
post #27 of 27

I used my aunts recipe, the variation with the chocolate, fondant, royal icing, gum paste, & piping gel for the cake.

The cake flavor itself is double chocolate.

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