I Need A New Pastry Brush...

Decorating By absijails Updated 26 Aug 2013 , 11:15pm by MBalaska

absijails Posted 3 Nov 2008 , 1:47am
post #1 of 12

Can someone recommend a good brand for a pastry brush that doesn't lose it's bristles?
I've purchased several from various stores (the last one coming from Williams Sonoma) and they all seem to end up losing their bristles. Before I purchase yet anther one, I'd like some recommendations. So if you have a good one, please let me know!
Thanks!

11 replies
becklynn Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 4:37pm
post #2 of 12

I'd like to know too!!

giraffe11 Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 4:56pm
post #3 of 12

Oh....I hate that! Always happens.....doesn't seem to matter how much it costs either. I can't offer any suggestions, but I would love to hear the answer!

mariela_ms Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 4:56pm
post #4 of 12

I've seen Alton Brown from Good Eats show using the silicone ones. I'm actually thinking of buying one since mine loses its bristles too! HTH

selahmycat Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 4:59pm
post #5 of 12

I have the silicone pastry brush from Pampered Chef, and i love it!! No more lost bristles!!!

leah_s Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 5:19pm
post #6 of 12

At some point in their lifespan, the brushes will lose their bristles. It's the nature of the item. I buy them at a local restaurant supply store. High quality that lasts a long time.

nickshalfpint Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 5:32pm
post #7 of 12

I have the silicone one too! I was getting sick of the bristles falling out!

giraffe11 Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 5:34pm
post #8 of 12

I have the silicone ones.....they are great for basting BBQ, but not so good for pastry and baking. I've tried the pampered chef too.....and haven't been pleased. They seemed to last less time than some cheaper options. I guess I'll just have to make peace with the fact that there are no perfect pastry brushes.
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KoryAK Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 6:42pm
post #9 of 12

Silicone sucks. It just can't hold things (BBQ sauce yes, simple syrup no). Try the restaurant supply house ones that are made of nylon. Eventually it will go kaput, but more all at once than piece by hairy-looking piece into your food.

Lalana Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 6:57pm
post #10 of 12

This may be common sense, but thought I'd throw it out there just in case. Don't put them in the dishwasher. The heat loosens the glue and shortens the life span. My best one lasted about 3 years before it lost it's bristles. I don't remember the brand but I got it from a gourmet shop and I know we use the same ones in pastry school, so definitely go with the pro ones (restaurant supply).

absijails Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 6:58pm
post #11 of 12

Thanks, everyone!
I too have purchased silicone and found it fine for thick sauces, but not at all what I need for pastry work.
I'll check at the local restaurant supply store and see what they've got!
Thanks again!

MBalaska Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 11:15pm
post #12 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by leah_s 
At some point in their lifespan, the brushes will lose their bristles. It's the nature of the item. I buy them at a local restaurant supply store. High quality that lasts a long time.

leah_s:  so what IS a pro brush.  (The Hairy beast leaving hairs in pan - are driving me Nutso.)  supposedly the brushes I have bought have the bristles set in epoxy or something to hold them in.  But they still shed - even the new ones. I always wash by hand.  Silicon is for basting. Paper towels don't give a consistent even coating.  This is an old thread I found after searching and reading everything, didn't get a definitive recent answer.

 

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