Bereavement Package Help...

Decorating By mommyle Updated 2 Nov 2008 , 1:41am by mommyle

mommyle Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 2:24am
post #1 of 20

Spelling aside...
We have a friend who was diagnosed with cancer and is on pain management (meaning he won't be around much longer). He is leaving behind 3 kids and a very loving wife. Extremely sudden and terribly upsetting. My mom has made a couple of lasagnas for them, but I'm thinking more in the sweets department (happens to be my forte). I am making a couple of bundt cakes, but I would like to make a couple of unique dainty-type things also.
Here is the catch. They need to be fairly easy for me to make (doing them this weekend), and they need to be able to be frozen and kept for a while. I'm thinking that the family is going to have to host a few gatherings after he passes, and it's nice to be able to pull out a little plate of sweets on a moment's notice.
I know that you guys know what will work best. You always have so much help, that you were the first that I came to.
Thanks so much in advance!!! I totally appreciate the time and the effort. I know that you are all super busy right now too.
Again, Thank you for all your help!

19 replies
ski Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 3:47am
post #2 of 20

You are very sweet to do this, I had a friend whose brother died and everyone gave me heck for wanting to cook and bake for her. After it was done, she told me that the food was the only thing that seemed real and comforting to her and her other siblings. That was good to hear and nice to know for any future things like this. I can only say that I think any cake would keep in the freezer as long as it is wrapped really good. Everyone who has done wedding cakes usually saves the top cake for the 1st anniversary, so having had some of that cake I can say it keep and tasted rather good. Bless you for your kindness. thumbs_up.gif

mommyle Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 3:54am
post #3 of 20

Thank you, ski. It really is the least that I can do. I will wrap the cakes really well, and perhaps wrap them in halves so that she can just pull out a half if she only needs a little. Thanks for the kind words and the good advice!

liapsim Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 4:06am
post #4 of 20

I know you could do some non-cake things, like bon bons, pies, and breads (banana nut, pumpkin) all freeze well.

Try www.kraftfoods.com for VERY easy recipes to do. Best of luck to you and bless you for doing something so selfless!

Ruth0209 Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 4:12am
post #5 of 20

How about a bunch of cake balls? Those freeze well, don't they?

buffim Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 4:15am
post #6 of 20

I don't have a specific recipe, but when my best friend had her first baby I brought over some meals, and also some snack food (crackers/cheese, precut veggies) which were easy to pull out if company came over to meet the baby (or if she wanted a snack and didn't have time to make a meal), and some cookies. I think things that can just be pulled out and tossed on a plate are nice (ie instead of cutting up a cake).

I think this is a great way to show someone you care for them! Best of luck.

mommyle Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 4:29am
post #7 of 20

I was wondering if I cover my cakeballs in chocolate, can I still freeze them? Won't that make the chocolate look wierd? Will it affect the truffle filling?
They are about 5 hours drive away from us, so freezable things that I can send up with my dad are pretty-much the only things that I can do. I like the breads idea. Perhaps I'll do a bunch of mini-muffins for them too. The kids can grab them by the handful as a snack if they need to.
Thanks for all your help, guys! I really appreciate it!

itsmylife Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 4:40am
post #8 of 20

Such a kind thing that you are doing... my thoughts go out to your friend and his family.

Some other food ideas... maybe some cookies - they always freeze well or for something fancier... petit fours.

If you are going to freeze ahead... I would maybe try to vacuum seal.... it definitely helps the shelf life tremendously. Just stop the suck before it totally compacts everything .... I've done it many times with cookies I've frozen, and they come out perfect.

HTH
Denise

indydebi Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 12:47pm
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski

You are very sweet to do this, I had a friend whose brother died and everyone gave me heck for wanting to cook and bake for her. After it was done, she told me that the food was the only thing that seemed real and comforting to her and her other siblings.




What planet is your friend from? Because food is what we do when someone passes.

There was a kid from my daughter's school who was killed in a car wreck last week. He was 14. Drunk driver. I don't know the family from adam, but I took a cake and a box of cookies to their house just because I wanted to do something for the family .... for our neighbors. The mom was VERY touched that a perfect stranger would do something like that (and yeah, we did the crying and the mom-hugs).

Plus, as was posted above, there will be a lot of folks coming over, and having the extra food helps the family feed everyone who stops by.

pamconn Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 1:16pm
post #10 of 20

Another idea would be to take an entire loaf of bread,(I use the Texas Toast size) and make up a batch of french toast and freeze it. You can then give that with some butter/margarine and syrup.

Makes it easy to just grab a slice or two out and pop in the toaster or microwave when you just aren't feeling up to making breakfast.

mommyle Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 3:25pm
post #11 of 20

pamconn, first, I LOVE your tag-line!!! I think I'm experiencing the same thing!!!

Second, that is an awesome idea!!! I do it for my kids, why not them too??? Thanks!

GeminiRJ Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 5:26pm
post #12 of 20

When my FIL died suddenly, I was kinda surprised at the almost total lack of sweets that my MIL received. We had more sandwich trays than you could shake a stick at, but other than half a dozen cookies from the neighbor...no sweets. I think the cake balls would work beautifully, and just about everyone loves cookies. Cupcakes are also nice. They can take out a few or a lot, depending on the need. Bless you for thinking of the family!

mkolmar Posted 1 Nov 2008 , 2:16am
post #13 of 20

A cheesecake would be good because those can be in a freezer for a while. Pies that are par-baked, cookies, brownies and cakes would work. What about even stopping and picking up those little eclairs and cream puffs they sell in the frozen section of the grocery store.

cocorum21 Posted 1 Nov 2008 , 3:59pm
post #14 of 20

What about making up some cookie dough and freeze them in little balls and put them in a big tub so she can make some home made cookies when she feels.

mommyle Posted 1 Nov 2008 , 4:03pm
post #15 of 20

Oh THAT's a good idea!!! Thanks!

Jocmom Posted 1 Nov 2008 , 4:11pm
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyle

I was wondering if I cover my cakeballs in chocolate, can I still freeze them? Won't that make the chocolate look wierd? Will it affect the truffle filling? . . .




I knew that I was going to be busy this week, so I made 8 dozen assorted cake balls last week and froze them. I took them out of the freezer yesterday as soon as I got out of bed, and they were thawed and ready to eat when I arrived at work. Some were covered in milk chocolate, some were covered in tinted white chocolate. They perspired a little, but that evaporated. The chocolate and the filling was just fine. The balls disappeared quickly, and no one noticed that they'd been frozen.

Narie Posted 1 Nov 2008 , 4:13pm
post #17 of 20

Make cookies and put them in zip lock freezer bags. Several different kinds would be good. People do drop by and being able to put out a plate of cookies would be handy. Also, people may refuse a piece of pie or cake as too much fuss, but cookies always get eaten.

mommyle Posted 1 Nov 2008 , 6:03pm
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jocmom

Some were covered in milk chocolate, some were covered in tinted white chocolate. They perspired a little, but that evaporated. The chocolate and the filling was just fine. The balls disappeared quickly, and no one noticed that they'd been frozen.




I had wondered about them blooming? What kind of chocolate did you use?

Jocmom Posted 1 Nov 2008 , 9:10pm
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyle

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jocmom

Some were covered in milk chocolate, some were covered in tinted white chocolate. They perspired a little, but that evaporated. The chocolate and the filling was just fine. The balls disappeared quickly, and no one noticed that they'd been frozen.



I had wondered about them blooming? What kind of chocolate did you use?




I used Merken's chocolate discs.

mommyle Posted 2 Nov 2008 , 1:41am
post #20 of 20

Okay. Thanks so much for your help!

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