Newbie Here...and I Have Questions

Decorating By angienfred820 Updated 30 Oct 2008 , 3:31pm by angienfred820

angienfred820 Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 5:05pm
post #1 of 5

Hi Everyone,

I was told about this site from my friend Sarah. I am from Sacramento, Ca and I like doing arts and crafts and have taken the basic cake classes from Michaels craft store.

I am making a cake for my duaghters first birthday and it is on SAturday NOvember 1st.

I am making a castle cake. I saw a picture on this site that I liked and I am going to attemt it.

So I need some help:

I am baking the cake today (well as I am typing)


Questions:
I hear a lot of people freeze or refriderate thier cake to help cool it down when I do this do I wrap it in plastic wrap?

When I crumb coat do I put it back in the fridge? If so for how long beofore I can but the icing on the cake?

When should I frost the cake? and decorate?

The only decorations I will have on the cake will be some roses, that I would like to make out of fondant. when should I start these roses? How long should they dry for?


The books tell me how to make everything but no time frame when constructing.

ANY help would be GREATLY appreciated.....

BTW.... I was a bit overwhelmed when I first started looking at this site.... There is sooo much to see....


Thanks in advance

Angie

4 replies
kelleym Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 6:20pm
post #2 of 5

Welcome to CakeCentral! You will learn more here than you ever dreamed possible!

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I hear a lot of people freeze or refriderate thier cake to help cool it down when I do this do I wrap it in plastic wrap?



You will get different answers on this. Some people wrap their cake in plastic wrap while it is still warm and then freeze it to "seal in" the moisture. I personally do not do this, I let the cake cool on a rack on the counter until it is totally cooled. Then, if I am going to freeze, I wrap in a layer of plastic wrap plus a layer of foil.

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When I crumb coat do I put it back in the fridge? If so for how long beofore I can but the icing on the cake?



Again, you will get many answers. I don't refrigerate after a crumb coat unless my filling is perishable. Usually you want the crumb coat to set long enough to "crust", if you are using a crusting buttercream (Wilton's "class" buttercream is a crusting buttercream - it forms a sort of crust when exposed to the air for a period of time). How long it takes to crust depends on your exact frosting recipe and the humidity/temperature in your home. I let my crumb coats sit anywhere from 15 minutes to several hours (or sometimes even overnight).

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When should I frost the cake? and decorate?



Many people bake Wednesday or Thursday for a Saturday event. I would bake Thursday and decorate Friday.

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The only decorations I will have on the cake will be some roses, that I would like to make out of fondant. when should I start these roses? How long should they dry for?



The time it takes them to dry will again depend on the climate in your home. I would start making them now, because they will last for a long, long time after you make them.

Again, welcome! I'm sure JanH will be along soon to provide you with links to threads that discuss your questions in far greater detail icon_smile.gif

sari66 Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 7:06pm
post #3 of 5

I agree with KellyM for a cake on Sat I bake thursday and decorate Friday. You will get lots of info here and quickly become addicted!!
Happy caking

kakeladi Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 12:45am
post #4 of 5

UUUuuuuugggggg I just spent 5 minutes typing out a long reply and it dissapearedicon_sad.gif Let's try again:

For a crumb coat you can take about 1/3 to 1/2 cup of b'cream and melt it in the microwave (about 5-10 seconds) Watch it close and when you see it melting take it out. You don't want to overheat it. It needs to be used right away - if it cools it won't work and cannot be reused/reheated.
Once it is liquid just spread it as thin as you can on your cake. It will be somewhat like a glazed donute. Just be sure you completely cover the cake to seal it. There usually is a color change to help you know when it is covered/sealed as it dries almost instantly. Once the cake is crumbed this way it can sit out uncovered for as much as 3 daysicon_smile.gif Of course I have never kept one around - I usually go right to my final coating of icing. I have used all shortening and 1/2 butter/1/2 shortening b'cream.
Yu can make your roses now. They will dry some but not become hard as a rock. To keep them softer, put them in an airtight container like tubberwear. Keep in a cool, dry, dark place.

angienfred820 Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 3:31pm
post #5 of 5

THANK YOU for your responses.....

Its really nice to have a place where newbies can ask questions and not feel embaressed or made fun of from the more experienced cakers....



Thanks again!!!!

Angie

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