Dark Chocolate That Is Poured Smooth Over Cakes????

Decorating By Evone Updated 31 Oct 2008 , 6:38am by bakeyclacker

Evone Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 4:08pm
post #1 of 23

Does anyone know what that dark chocolate is that can cover a whole cake or just be drizzled over it My Daughter was in charge of the shop one day and told someone that I would make this chocolate covered cake for their wedding and thought I knew how I guess... I could strangle her lol. Now I need advice quick, as I just discovered the wedding is this weekend and I have no Idea what I am doing. HELPPPPPPPPP

22 replies
lapazlady Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 5:12pm
post #2 of 23

Have you looked at chocolate ganache? That should give you a shiny, chocolate covering.

mbt4955 Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 6:40pm
post #3 of 23

I think that ganache is what you want to use. If it is warm enough, you can just pour it over the cake and smooth the sides a little. I will try to attach a picture here. This obviously isn't the finished product and I had a little texture on the top, but it can be as smooth as the buttercream that is underneath it.
LL

kakeladi Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 11:04pm
post #4 of 23

This can also be done w/(OH horors!) *can icing* melted inthe MWicon_smile.gif

mbt4955 Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 11:08pm
post #5 of 23

Ganache is really easy to make - whipping cream and chocolate ...

tperks Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 11:31pm
post #6 of 23

I've never thought of doing that. Don't tell anyone, but I love canned icing - especially the vanilla -too bad it won't pipe well.

cylstrial Posted 29 Oct 2008 , 11:57pm
post #7 of 23

I have always wanted to do a ganache cake...I just don't see how you smooth it out. Oh well.. I'll get there one day! Thanks for your idea's!

indydebi Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 12:02am
post #8 of 23

It kinda just smoothes itself out. I pour it over the top tier and it just flows out and runs down the side of the cake. the only time I use the spatula is to push add'l chocolate over the edge. You need to have a nice smooth base, though .... any bump in the cake or the BC crumbcoat will show thru the ganache.

CreationsByCaryl Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 12:02am
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tperks

I've never thought of doing that. Don't tell anyone, but I love canned icing - especially the vanilla -too bad it won't pipe well.




It does if you add more sugar.

Mike1394 Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 12:08am
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evone

Does anyone know what that dark chocolate is that can cover a whole cake or just be drizzled over it HELPPPPPPPPP




pate glace, but ganache will work.

Mike

lapazlady Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 12:28am
post #11 of 23

Mike, what is pate glace? I Googled it and Epicurious didn't get an exact match (or any other that made any sense).

ccarroca Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 12:44am
post #12 of 23

Can you use chocolate chips or does it have to be the bars? I heard there is a difference. I am making a ganache cake for my husbands bday and he only likes milk chocolate.

mbt4955 Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 1:18am
post #13 of 23

I have used bittersweet chips, but I haven't ever done milk chocolate ganache. I would say give it a try. You might need more chocolate than with dark. Let us know what happens.

PinkZiab Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 1:23am
post #14 of 23

Pate a glace, ganache, or a chocolate glaze are all viable options.

aundrea Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 1:27am
post #15 of 23

quick question? is gnache better with heavy cream or whipping cream?

sari66 Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 3:04am
post #16 of 23

Ganache is better with heavy cream icon_smile.gif

lapazlady Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 11:40am
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by aundrea

quick question? is gnache better with heavy cream or whipping cream?




I make it with whipping cream. But, I'll bet most use heavy cream (which I can't buy here in anything but tiny quantities). The whipping cream can be whipped up so you can pipe with it. Others may have other opinions, tho.

mbt4955 Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 12:58pm
post #18 of 23

I hate to sound stupid, but what specifically is the difference in heavy cream and whipping cream? I have also bought "heavy whipping cream" ...

mbt4955 Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 1:04pm
post #19 of 23

I think I just answered my own question, but I found this online ...



Whipping cream and heavy cream are not always the same thing.

The USDA regulates how much fat must be in certain dairy products sold in the US. What they are called has to do with fat content, not additives like carageenan.

By law, to be called "heavy cream" a cream must have at least 36% milkfat and can have more.

By law, "light whipping cream" must have at least 30% but less than 36% milkfat.

"Light cream" (sometimes called "coffee cream") must have at least 18% milkfat, but less than 30%

"Half and Half" must have at least 10.5% milkfat, but less than 18%.


Any comments from those of you who know? I guess I should start only buying the heavy stuff!

lapazlady Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 1:14pm
post #20 of 23

I believe whipping cream has stabilizers.

Mike1394 Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 6:39pm
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lapazlady

I believe whipping cream has stabilizers.




No

Mike

lapazlady Posted 30 Oct 2008 , 6:51pm
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Quote:
Originally Posted by lapazlady

I believe whipping cream has stabilizers.



No

Mike




Additives such as carageenan and glycerol monostearate are sometimes added as stabilizers

bakeyclacker Posted 31 Oct 2008 , 6:38am
post #23 of 23

Mike, you forgot to mention what pate a glace is?

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