Large Air Bubbles Trapped Under My Fondant.

Decorating By Reilly Updated 27 Oct 2008 , 6:06pm by Reilly

Reilly Posted 27 Oct 2008 , 12:01am
post #1 of 7

This has happened to me twice now. Within 30 minutes of covering my cake with fondant and assembling it for stacked construction, I noticed a very large air bubble under the fondant (it's not in the fondant, it's trapped underneath it). I always use fondant and this has only happened twice. This isn't the typical small bubbles that you can release with pin prick, I can actually see the fondant expanding like a balloon. After brain storming, the only thing that I can come up with that was different about this construction is that the support dowels were slightly shorter than they should've been, leaving the cakes to smush down on the remaining tiers. And actually, the first time this happened 2 years ago, the dowels were short on that cake as well and there were several bubble bulges....hum... Does anyone have any thoughts?? Thanks.

6 replies
mamacc Posted 27 Oct 2008 , 1:34pm
post #2 of 7

it happens....probably got trapped under there when you were first laying the fondant on. I usually pierce them with an exacto knife and push the air out throught the puncture. You'll have a small mark but at least it's better than a giant bubble!

kjt Posted 27 Oct 2008 , 1:57pm
post #3 of 7

I don't understand...how are you using the dowells? Are you covering several cakes at the time with the fondant? I just can't visualize what you mean about the dowells being too short...I mean I know what that means, but please explain your construction...thanks!

Oh, and welcome to CC icon_smile.gif

DianaMarieMTV Posted 27 Oct 2008 , 2:01pm
post #4 of 7

What temp are your cakes cakes when you cover them? I've had problems when using a cake that's partially frozen.

MissRobin Posted 27 Oct 2008 , 2:10pm
post #5 of 7

I have had this happen before also, just this last weekend, I think part of the problem is your fondant is not adhering to your BC or what ever icing you are using. I use a really heavy crusting BC and when I forget to mist with water, this usually happens. I did it this last weekend with one of the tiers and sure enough I got a big ol bubble which actually cracked the fondant. I just punctured it and smoothed it out and then melted some fondant with water and painted over the crack to seal it. It is very frustrating, this is the only thing I can think of that caused mine, my cake were completely thawed and at room temp. so I wouldn't think it would be moisture trapped inside the cake??? One of those crazy things that can happen with fondant.

MissRobin Posted 27 Oct 2008 , 2:11pm
post #6 of 7

I have had this happen before also, just this last weekend, I think part of the problem is your fondant is not adhering to your BC or what ever icing you are using. I use a really heavy crusting BC and when I forget to mist with water, this usually happens. I did it this last weekend with one of the tiers and sure enough I got a big ol bubble which actually cracked the fondant. I just punctured it and smoothed it out and then melted some fondant with water and painted over the crack to seal it. It is very frustrating, this is the only thing I can think of that caused mine, my cake were completely thawed and at room temp. so I wouldn't think it would be moisture trapped inside the cake??? One of those crazy things that can happen with fondant.

Reilly Posted 27 Oct 2008 , 6:06pm
post #7 of 7

KJT - Thanks for the welcome. The cakes had been individually covered with fondant and about 30-40 mins later I placed the tiers on top of each other. Winthin about 20 minutes the air pockets occured. After cutting the dowels and placing them in the cake, I noticed they (the dowels) were just a little too short, but since this cake was for a friend and they could care less about the "imperfections", I stacked the cakes anyway.

Maybe this will help (here's the construction and the location of the air bubbles): the 1st cake had 3 tiers, bubbles formed underneath the fondant of the middle and top tier (in several locations), the 2nd cake had only 2 tiers and a large bubble formed only on the top tier. I wonder......if when the cakes were placed on top of each other, with the dowels being too short, did the fondant get smushed up causing a tunnel for air to get in underneath it?

DianaMarieMTV - my cakes are slightly chilled, not frozen when I cover them with fondant.

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