What Kind Of Ovens Do You Use?

Business By jnmgreen Updated 7 Aug 2016 , 11:00pm by -K8memphis

jnmgreen Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 3:20am
post #1 of 10

I've just opened up a commercial kitchen and I'm looking into a bigger oven. I wondered what people were using. I was looking into a pizza oven? I would like some comments from some bakers that are well experienced with this.

9 replies
Mike1394 Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 11:52am
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnmgreen

I've just opened up a commercial kitchen and I'm looking into a bigger oven. I wondered what people were using. I was looking into a pizza oven? I would like some comments from some bakers that are well experienced with this.




What do you produce? The issue is in my.02 not all ovens will cover all items. If by saying pizza ovens you are talking a deck oven than it will certainly depend on what your baking. My .02 decks are good for pies, cheesecakes, and artisan breads. That's on a fairly low volume also. decks take a lot of time to cook. Plus the stones in them can have hot, and cold spots. If doing cookies, muffins, scones, cakes. I would certainly go with a convection. Now if you can afford a rotating convection where you insert the rack, and everything that's the cat's behind as they say. LOL icon_biggrin.gif

It depends on what your producing though.

Mike

debster Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 12:09pm
post #3 of 10

Get a hold of Jennifer Dontz, she was telling me of the electric convection oven she uses that makes a ton of cake at one time. They are commercial. I forget the name but as soon as I make enough I'm getting one. They run around 4,000 but with an Ices membership I believe it was cut down drastically.

Ok I looked it's www.deluxeovens.com

They are portable and can be moved and if you get out of the business you can resell and she said it runs off of 220 I believe. Good luck.

cakesondemand Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 11:44pm
post #4 of 10

US Range/Garland 6 shelves electric connvection oven best investment ever.

jnmgreen Posted 27 Oct 2008 , 1:59am
post #5 of 10

Thanks everyone for your replies they were all very helpful. I didn't know if a convection oven was for baking cakes. Now i know that they are. Thanks.

xoufood Posted 7 Aug 2016 , 8:04pm
post #6 of 10

What if i want to make cakes, muffins, cookies, croissants, meringues and macarons and one ttpe of basic bread..  can these be made in a deck oven? Or in this case it is better to have a convection oven (i can not afford a rotating one).

-K8memphis Posted 7 Aug 2016 , 9:25pm
post #7 of 10

yes i've made most of that list in a deck oven -- sure no worries

xoufood Posted 7 Aug 2016 , 9:48pm
post #8 of 10

Thanks for your reply :).. but could you please be more specific :D .. i mean which families you tried ? And do you elevate the baking sheet on trays or directly place the sheet on the deck?


Sorry for the detailed questions, i live in Cairo Egypt and it is super hard here to reach an information!

-K8memphis Posted 7 Aug 2016 , 10:56pm
post #9 of 10

i think it was a blodgett, 4 deck gas pizza oven and you could fit two full size sheet pans in each deck -- I placed the baking sheets directly on the decks -- I had some baking sheets that were about 2" to 2.5" deep and each pan covered the entire deck -- i baked huge crumb kuchens in there -- I never baked croissants or macarons in there but I could have -- the oven could have handled it --

it was not convection -- 

one thing that usually comes up with deck ovens is you can't bake large turkeys or use Dutch ovens because they are too tall for the height of the deck -- you want to be sure you get a good depth between decks -- but for the turkeys you just smash them down first and they will fit -- if you turn the lid upside down on the Dutch oven it might fit --

it was a great oven

-K8memphis Posted 7 Aug 2016 , 11:00pm
post #10 of 10

the floor of each deck was metal not ceramic -- if it was ceramic it might have baked faster -- they held the temperature well even without stones

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%