Box Mix Amounts?

Decorating By Stephania27 Updated 24 Oct 2008 , 2:30am by kakeladi

Stephania27 Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 7:42pm
post #1 of 7

Hi everyone!

I am a newbie, and I was wondering if anyone could tell me how many cups of prepared batter a box mix will make. I tried looking in the forums with no luck (although I am sure it has been asked and answered somewhere!).

Also, I am so thankful to find this site! I have been bitten by the cake decorating bug, and have already tried some recipes from here and have been inspired by everyone's beautiful cakes!

Thanks!

Steph

6 replies
bigsisof3kids Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 8:47pm
post #2 of 7

Hi Stephania! Welcome to CC icon_smile.gif
A box mix will generally yield 4-6 cups of batter. I use Duncan Hines, because it is a higher yield then other brands, like Betty Crocker. HTH!

banba Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 9:59pm
post #3 of 7

I asked something similar the other day. I wanted to know the weight of a box mix because I wanted to try the WASC which calls for 2 box mixes.... full stop.

Two box mixes could be anything.

For such a popular recipe the response to my question was very poor indeed.

I was always told that a good recipe and the correct way to write a recipe is to have all weights and measurements laid out, so a box of this and a stick of that does not make much sense all over the world.

A well written recipe should always include cake pan sizes and temperature guides.

And I think yields should be added to the list too!

aztomcat Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 10:13pm
post #4 of 7

I usually get about 5 cups from a DH mix then I use the cake mix extender listed here and get at least one extra cup of batter.

Mike1394 Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 10:20pm
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by banba

I asked something similar the other day. I wanted to know the weight of a box mix because I wanted to try the WASC which calls for 2 box mixes.... full stop.

Two box mixes could be anything.

For such a popular recipe the response to my question was very poor indeed.

I was always told that a good recipe and the correct way to write a recipe is to have all weights and measurements laid out, so a box of this and a stick of that does not make much sense all over the world.

A well written recipe should always include cake pan sizes and temperature guides.

And I think yields should be added to the list too!




That's the issue w/ Amer. recipes they basically suck. LOLOL half the recipe could be in cups, and the other 1/2 could be in weights. Then you get the arguement of what can be weighed, and what can't. Then I always love the 1 cup of apples. What the heck is that LOLOL.

Mike

banba Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 10:37pm
post #6 of 7

Well I am glad sombody agrees with me on that. I was afraid of getting told off icon_lol.gif

What really tickles me sometimes is sometimes they can't even understand their own recipes icon_confused.gif

People buy a weighing scales please. It is virtually impossible to make two identical cakes from one recipe using cups it is just not percisson(sp?) baking IMHO.

But with respect I take my hat off to all the peeps that have managed to use this method of weighing ingredients to make their cakes!

You deserve medals icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 2:30am
post #7 of 7

.........Duncan Hines, because it is a higher yield then other brands, like Betty Crocker......

Actually they all end up raising almost the same - very little difference.
Each flavor will make a different amount of batter but if you put all the batter into one 10x2 pan they will all rise to the same levelicon_smile.gif

What matters more than knowing how many cups of batter is how many mixes are needed in each pan. Learning that will be much better.
You can measure batter. In a 2" deep pan you should have about 1 1/2 inches of batter.
One mix will be enough batter for: one 10x2 round OR one 8x2" sq OR one 12x8x2 sheet and most Wilton shaped pans. Oh & three 6x2" rounds.
Two mixes fills one 14x2 round OR one 12x2 sq OR one 11x15x2 sheet.

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