Question for those who bake and sell from home

Business By mommaroxy Updated 29 Nov 2014 , 4:52pm by mls2604

-K8memphis Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:47am
post #121 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

Here in NH you can't use the kitchen sink to wash your hands.. that sink is your "sanitation sink" and you have to use the bathroom sink to wash your hands and have a roll of paper towels in there.

Such different regulations over this great country of ours.. it's enough to drive you batty.




Yeah, Jeanne, for sure crazy different, emphasis on crazy.

Those regulations are for commercial bakeries because there is no legal home baking in my county. I should have made that distinction in the earlier post. But I was just comparing it to what is allow-able in a home.

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:52am
post #122 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

In Tennessee you can't have a bathroom open into or toward the kitchen--you have to have a hallway with doors as a buffer in between.

After you wash your hands in the bathroom and re-enter the kitchen, you have to wash your hands again.



I do that sometimes anyway...LOL...bathroom doors are gross...(or can be!)




I set that rule in my kitchen anyway ..... yeah, you PROBABLY washed your hands in the bathroom ... but I didn't see you do it, so hands ARE washed upon entry into my kitchen.

Deb_ Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 3:06am
post #123 of 223

I wonder if those Purel dispensers could be incorporated somehow. I've noticed those things popping up everywhere.
We were at a wedding a couple of weeks ago and they had one of those dispensers hanging on the wall near the alter. The priest and the people that were serving communion, used the Purel before they touched anything.

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 3:14am
post #124 of 223

My health dept puts out literature that says using hand sanitizers does NOT replace hand washing. (I was involved at an outdoor event where portable hand washing stations were required if serving food .... detailed instructions were passed to all vendors, along with the info re: the sanitizer.)

Kitagrl Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 3:17am
post #125 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

My health dept puts out literature that says using hand sanitizers does NOT replace hand washing. (I was involved at an outdoor event where portable hand washing stations were required if serving food .... detailed instructions were passed to all vendors, along with the info re: the sanitizer.)




I wouldn't think so...it won't kill viruses, and it won't kill all of the bacteria that I know of...? I use it in absence of a sink but I figured in hospitals and kitchens its more of a "post hand washing" thing, to further kill anything left on your hands.

Actually I heard running water with regular soap does more than anything else to clean your hands.

SANDRAAMADOR Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 3:23am
post #126 of 223

ok would like to know, how much it is to get a license in the state of florida any one out there than can give us the information

Deb_ Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 3:24am
post #127 of 223

Thanks indy.......that makes sense...
I still chuckle now when I think of that purel dispenser on the alter, it was so out of place. My DH leaned over and whispered to me "Do you think that's Holy Purel?"

FromScratch Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 3:55am
post #128 of 223

In Florida you cannot have your home kitchen licensed. It has to be a separate commercial kitchen.

Those hand sanitizers aren't worth their weight in dog poo. The don't kill much of anything and actually, bacteria will actually grow on it. In my microbiology class we did experiments to see which "anti-bacterial" agents worked the best.. the only thing that truely worked was good ole' Clorox bleach. Even the hospital grade foam hand sanitizer allowed bacterial growth. They foster a false sense of security. People feel that they don't have to wash their hands because they used purell and they can spread more germs than they would if they just washed with warm water and normal (not anti-bacterial) soap.

cakeballs Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 4:01am
post #129 of 223

icon_confused.gif Washing your hands in the BATHROOM is cleaner than the kitchen sink? Really? icon_surprised.gif

I have read all of this and appreciate the information shared by everyone. I am in the beginning, feeling my way phase, making a cake for every possible occasion and trying to learn as much as I can. I understand the liability issues in being licensed. The part I don't understand is the idea that if I sell my cakes cheaper, I'm hurting someones business. I have never sold a cake, but if I did I would have to sell it at prices the people I know would be able to afford. If a licensed baker sells a 10" round for 70$, maybe that's very reasonable where they live, but nobody I know could afford that. If thay had to pay even half of that, they simply would not buy it. So, if I sold it to them for an amount they could afford, it would not hurt the business of someone who charged more because they would not have that customer anyway.

FromScratch Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 5:46am
post #130 of 223

It's not that the bathroom is cleaner than the kitchen.. it's so that you aren't contaminating your sanitation sink with your handwashing.

And yes.. my bathroom is VERY clean when I am baking and decorating. It's usually clean since I have young kids and I like it to be clean for them (and I have to clean it daily BECAUSE of them and their messes), but on cake days it gets the deep clean complete with bleach... the whole thing including the cabinet and door handles and floor and walls surrounding the sink. The whole first floor gets the deep clean on baking days, but the "handwashing sink" and surrounding areas get the deepest clean (aside from the kitchen). Yes it can take me a solid hour to get the place ready for baking, but it's what I signed up for. A commercial kitchen would be MUCH easier.. at the end of the day it gets cleaned and the next morning.. it's still clean and ready for you. Unlike my home kitchen that gets messed up by its inhabitants so momma/bakery owner has to clean it many times a day and in the morning too.. even if it was cleaned the night before. There are days when I wish I just had a full commercial kitchen outside of my home.. it'd make the cleaning part easier anyway. icon_lol.gif

And to Heather.. if you sell your cakes for pennies on the dollar, the one you are hurting most is yourself. You are working hard for not a lot of compensation and taking time away from your life and your family with little to show for it.

I am one of those who charge plenty for cakes.. minimum order is $100 and that will get you an 8" cake covered in fondant and nicely decorated. I want the hours that cakes take me away from my family to be worth it. I am not going to spend 4 hours on a cake (4 hours that I could be enjoying my kids and husband) only to make $10. No way no how. I'd rather not make that $10 and read to my children.

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 11:42am
post #131 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by heather1972

but if I did I would have to sell it at prices the people I know would be able to afford.




I dont' think any business sets pricing that way. icon_confused.gif

Cost of raw materials plus labor plus overhead plus profit margin = selling price. "It is what it is."

My husband works at a cadillac dealership. Lots of folks spent $50,000 or more for a car there. The dealership doesn't set the price with the thought of "well, some people can't afford $50,000, so we'll just sell it for $30,000." They'd be out of business in no time. They have rent to pay, utilities, insurance, loan payments, payroll, benefits, etc etc to pay out of the profit of that car.

It costs what it costs.

The person who can't afford a $70 cake ... yeah, they may not be my customer anyway. But the person who CAN afford a $70 cake just might go elsewhere to buy the cake from the person who is undercutting the market and de-valueing the price of cakes.

It's like if you live in a $100,000 house neighborhood and one of your neighbors sells their house for $60,000. The comparables in your neighborhood just went down and when you try to sell your house, the buyer is going to tell you your house isn't worth $100,000 "....because the guy across the street sold his for $60,000."

justducky Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 11:45am
post #132 of 223

I thought I was the only one who scrubbed the kitchen just to get it dirty!! I am fortunate that my oldest son has had some kitchen time on the line. So he helps me keep it up to par. (He is even the one that checks dates on the condiments)

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 11:59am
post #133 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by justducky

I am fortunate that my oldest son has had some kitchen time on the line. So he helps me keep it up to par.



My son popped in one day just a day or two after a big catering, when everything is in the middle of being cleaned and being put away. He said, "Mom, I need to come down and help you do a thorough Marine Cleaning and Organizing!" My reaction?? "YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Be here!!!!" icon_biggrin.gif

CakeForte Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 5:37pm
post #134 of 223

I just wanted to comment on this general statement

*****charging is against the law if you aren't legal*****

Depending on where you are, even if you DON'T charge this is illegal as well.

I posted on another thread how my building is in the county, but on the city line...well the city regulations explicitly say "No food may be produce for free or for sale without a licensed kitchen."

So no matter what you really have to check where you live.

Niliquely Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 9:59pm
post #135 of 223

I live in Nebraska and according to our laws, you can sell cakes (and other baked goods - except cream pies!) at the local farmer's market on Saturdays. But now I'm all scared to try that even because of this site! I was going to try that until I can save up enough money for opening up a business. I am also thinking that we are a state that permits licensing home bakeries without a 2nd kitchen...but then I read all this and I feel guilty about that even...
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Mike1394 Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 11:15pm
post #136 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niliquely

I live in Nebraska and according to our laws, you can sell cakes (and other baked goods - except cream pies!) at the local farmer's market on Saturdays. But now I'm all scared to try that even because of this site! I was going to try that until I can save up enough money for opening up a business. I am also thinking that we are a state that permits licensing home bakeries without a 2nd kitchen...but then I read all this and I feel guilty about that even...
icon_sad.gif




Why feel guilty? That I don't understand. First start at your city level to evn see if it is allowable. Then go to county HD, then state AG. Find out was is allowable under your state laws.

I would think even at a Farmer's market they would need some kind of license. Even if it is to protect the owner of the market.

Mike

Niliquely Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 12:16am
post #137 of 223

As far as my city level - I live outside of any city limit and Ellsworth is unincorporated. I am checking on the state level - lucky me, my father-in-law is a state senator and he is helping me out with this BIG TIME - and I am planning to get licensed! Nebraska is not as strict as many states are. I still can't get over the guilty feeling though...I feel like someone who has been told she can have the candy when the other kids can't, do you know what I mean??? It just feels like a lot of people will be mad at me because I don't have to build a 2nd kitchen to get my license.
As far as the farmer's market goes - there is an inspection that goes into it (for all foods) and they CAN come look at your kitchen (but none of the ladies have ever had that happen) and you do have to have a temporary permit for canned and baked goods. If you really, really want to know how we do this you can go to the website at http://www.agr.ne.gov/pub/daf/farmmkt.htm

FromScratch Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 12:50am
post #138 of 223

Don't feel guilty.. it's not your fault that some states are more strict than others. icon_smile.gif

Niliquely Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 1:31am
post #139 of 223

By the way, I personally appreciate this discussion and read it top to bottom. I have never sold a cake for money (YET) and I now know that I should not without a license. Because of all the information posted here, I plan to get a license (my plan is by Jan. 2010) and until then I will practice, practice, practice and give them away (which is free advertising to build a customer base!). A great website that I found thanks to all of you fabulous cakesters is a planning site for small businesses and it includes an assessment to see if you are ready and what you need to do if you are not. So, even though I may not have as many hoops to jump through as others, I wanted you all to know that I am inspired to jump them thanks to this discussion! Oh, and here is that site:
http://www.sba.gov/smallbusinessplanner/index.html
thumbs_up.gif

Niliquely Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 2:48am
post #140 of 223

Wow, I just realized how long my posts are - OOPS!
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Mike1394 Posted 26 Oct 2008 , 9:20am
post #141 of 223

I know I'm not upset you don't have to build a 2nd kitchen. I'm just jealous LOLOL

Mike

kandu001 Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 1:02am
post #142 of 223

Even though we all should follow our state's rules, I do sympathize with those who are just starting out. It totally stinks to think that the first time someone asks to buy a cake from you that you can't charge them unless you immediately find a way to get licensed and start a business! I'm a teacher by day and cake decorator for family and friends only, always as my gift to them for whatever the occasion. I've thought of making it into a business, but how could I leave teaching my adorable students on a whim that I may have a great business with cakes just for that one person who asks to buy one...just a thought to vent. princess.gif

TSmith Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 3:11pm
post #143 of 223

I dont think you have to really have a liscense to do it. I started selling cakes to family and friends and i made business cards and put one on the box. then by word of mouth i started getting more people. I am still trying to get new clients but i dont think you have to have a seprate kitchen and all that stuff. like me i live in KY and there arent many people who makes cakes beside grocery stores and most people doesnt like them. so it spreads by word of mouth. so if you decide to sell cakes make some flyers and hang around and stuff. it mainly happens by word of mouth.

indydebi Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 3:17pm
post #144 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSmith

I dont think you have to really have a liscense to do it.



I'm pretty sure you are wrong on this. I'll invite the KY CC'ers to confirm or clarify.....

leah_s Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 4:29pm
post #145 of 223

TSmith, you are 100% wrong. You absolutely need a license in KY to sell cake. You either need a manufacturing license if you're wholesaling, or a catering license if you're selling retail.

It sounds like you're doing retail. Therefore you need to immediately do the following:
1) get a resale license from the State Department of Revenue
2) take a Food Sanitation course and pass the test
3) have your kitchen inspected by your local Health Department
4) pay your catering license fees
5) if you are in Jefferson County, you will also need to register with the local Department of Revenue and pay those business license fees also

Your kitchen will be inspected every 6 months.

leah_s Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 4:32pm
post #146 of 223

Oops - I forgot some stuff.

You should also incorporate, register your business name with both the state and your local county clerk (fees involved) and of course, purchase business liability insurance. If you're delivering in your personal vehicle, you might as well confess that to your car insurance carrier. And unfortunately your vehicle then needs to be insured as a commercial vehicle, rather than a personal vehicle. That costs more too.

The business world is wonderful is it not?

leah_s Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 4:41pm
post #147 of 223

I keep forgetting stuff! You first need to check your local zoning laws and subdivision deed restrictions to even see if you can have a business in your home.

Biabeke Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 5:04pm
post #148 of 223

I read all of the posts and I was almost discouraged. Oh well, I refuse to be dicouraged! Famous cake makers like Sylvia Weinstock and Ron Ben-Israel started very small. It would be preposterous for someone to just open a business right from the beginning. For those of you who are not legal yet, be discreet and secure enough clients before becoming legal.

leah_s Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 5:12pm
post #149 of 223

Yeah, good luck with that strategy. I was operating on a "limited license" and got caught the second week. Had to get the full catering license immediately. And I was not advertising. The Health Department inspectors live and work in the community too.

kokopuff Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 5:42pm
post #150 of 223

I am new to this site and I love it !It is very helpful.I was just wondering if anyone would know the laws for Ky.I am wanting to start a homebased business but don't know where to start.

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