Question For Those Who Bake And Sell From Home

Business By mommaroxy Updated 29 Nov 2014 , 4:52pm by mls2604

KeltoKel Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 12:37pm
post #91 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Quote:
Originally Posted by TERESA77

Guess Im just a bit touchy today.Pms maybe. Im just saying there are some people who are rude with teir answers.



Harsh maybe rude not.

Mike




There is no need to be harsh or rude. Plenty of people have answered this thread without being either one.

jammjenks Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 12:42pm
post #92 of 223

I realize ignorance is no excuse, but I honestly didn't even think about "getting legal" before I read about it on CC. It was just a hobby for me. People started paying me and so I thought, "Hey, I can make a few extra bucks doing something I like to do." Only after joining CC and reading on here did I realize that it would be best to go through all the proper channels. We are very rural here and a lot of people in our town have little things they do from home for a little extra cash...mowing grass, making candles, tailoring clothes, etc. It just seemed like one of those types of things to me. I do realize it is best to be legal before doing public business, but I am also glad that I got my feet wet before spending a lot of time and $$ on the legalities of it all. Actually in NC, it is not hard to become a licensed home baker and that's been my project since a few months ago when I got my inspection. Now I have everything in line and it honestly is a relief.

indydebi Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 12:49pm
post #93 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by jammjenks

I realize ignorance is no excuse, but I honestly didn't even think about "getting legal" before I read about it on CC.



When I first got started (probably before most of you were born!), I had no idea there were legalities involved. (Health Dept? License? Inspections? You need those? No kidding? Really?) But this was also 'back in the day' before the internet and definitely no CC helpers! And like you, it was a small town where everyone did a little something on the side for extra money.

The folks just starting out in this field are SO lucky and blessed to have access to good info that is shared here on CC .... you have the chance to learn in just a few weeks what took many of us a lifetime to figure out! And that's why many of us "share with a vengeance!" ...... I dont' want others to have to learn it the hard way .... I want to share what I've learned so they don't have to battle the stumbling blocks like I did. Maybe by sharing my experiences, they can save time and money as they work to get their dream-business off the ground.

momma28 Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 1:30pm
post #94 of 223

For those in Virginia I looked up the vda rules governing home baking business. Just FYI. There is a whole lot of arguing going on but not a whole lot of information posting so I figured it wouldn't take more than a minute to copy and paste. Of course this is only valid information for those in Virginia. Google is a wonderful tool icon_smile.gif


Location of a Home-Based Bakery
The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) has the authority to see that clean and wholesome bakery products, such as cakes, breads and cookies, are prepared under proper conditions. Although a license is not required for a home-based bakery, VDACS must inspect the facility that you intend to use. A separate kitchen is not required, but the products and ingredients must be kept separate from those used by your family. VDACS will need formulations (recipes) of the products that you intend to prepare as well as flow processes for these products. To insure that good manufacturing practices (GMP) are used, all products must undergo basic laboratory testing to make sure that they are not adulterated with bacteria that cause foodborne illness.

If the products will be sold to retail outlets, they must be labeled. The label must include: 1) name of the product; 2) net weight of the product; 3) name and address of the manufacturer and 4) a list of the ingredients in descending order by weight. All packaging used for the products must be made of food grade sources, as recognized by the Food and Drug Administration and the United States Department of Agriculture.

FromScratch Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 1:55pm
post #95 of 223

There is a huge thread posted at the top of the business section that lists it out by state and if each state allows the licensing of home kitchens. It's a sticky post.

-K8memphis Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 2:04pm
post #96 of 223

Pms'rs got nothing on the post menopausal...that are not currently behind bars.

We have the attention span of a four year old at the circus and the patience of a two year old in church.

"Are we there yet?"

icon_lol.gif

forthwife Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 2:24pm
post #97 of 223

Ok, so I've never recieved any money at all from my cakes. I pay for them entirely then donate them. I've been informed (on this site) that getting $3 to cover basic materials is a business transaction, so my next question is. Is it a business transaction to bake a cake for a church member's baptism party where they asked me to provide a service, but instead of receiving payment asking them to make a donation to the church? That way I get no money, but am at least feeling like something good is coming from the cake, other than happy tummies. I can't imagine I could get turned in for something like this because I don't think it's wrong....lemme know!

Callyssa Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 2:24pm
post #98 of 223

OH my gosh, is THAT what's wrong with me??!! I'm only 40 (ONLY....yeah! I remember when 40 was waaaaayyyy old!), I can't be facing this yet!!!

-K8memphis Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 2:43pm
post #99 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

Pms'rs got nothing on the post menopausal...that are not currently behind bars.

We have the attention span of a four year old at the circus and the patience of a two year old in church.

"Are we there yet?"

icon_lol.gif




Quote:
Originally Posted by Callyssa

OH my gosh, is THAT what's wrong with me??!! I'm only 40 (ONLY....yeah! I remember when 40 was waaaaayyyy old!), I can't be facing this yet!!!




Well there's no clear right or wrong to it. The one phrase that I think most characterizes this time of life is free at last.

<insert dancing gleefully smilie face>

Kitagrl Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 3:39pm
post #100 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by forthwife

Ok, so I've never recieved any money at all from my cakes. I pay for them entirely then donate them. I've been informed (on this site) that getting $3 to cover basic materials is a business transaction, so my next question is. Is it a business transaction to bake a cake for a church member's baptism party where they asked me to provide a service, but instead of receiving payment asking them to make a donation to the church? That way I get no money, but am at least feeling like something good is coming from the cake, other than happy tummies. I can't imagine I could get turned in for something like this because I don't think it's wrong....lemme know!




If my sister pays me $20 to buy material and make her a dress, its a favor. I can't see why cake would be any different if you are not running a business and advertising.

Mike1394 Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 3:58pm
post #101 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Quote:
Originally Posted by forthwife

Ok, so I've never recieved any money at all from my cakes. I pay for them entirely then donate them. I've been informed (on this site) that getting $3 to cover basic materials is a business transaction, so my next question is. Is it a business transaction to bake a cake for a church member's baptism party where they asked me to provide a service, but instead of receiving payment asking them to make a donation to the church? That way I get no money, but am at least feeling like something good is coming from the cake, other than happy tummies. I can't imagine I could get turned in for something like this because I don't think it's wrong....lemme know!



If my sister pays me $20 to buy material and make her a dress, its a favor. I can't see why cake would be any different if you are not running a business and advertising.




Without knowing what state she is from couldn't this be bad info? I don't see much difference either, but I don't make the laws. If laws were made by common sense we wouldn't much be in the predicament that we're in now.

Mike

bobwonderbuns Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 4:03pm
post #102 of 223

There used to be a couple of threads here on CC about starting home based baking businesses and which states were legal for that, but I'm not sure if they are still around. Does anyone remember those threads?

kelleym Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 4:07pm
post #103 of 223

As jkalman mentioned, it's a sticky thread at the top of this forum. However, the thread is quite large and with the last few pages corrupted in the crash it's hard to navigate. Here's the most recent info I have.

FromScratch Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 4:57pm
post #104 of 223

Kelly.. maybe we could see if Heath or Jackie could delete the old thread and put your latest update in a new one? That thread is full of info if you can weed through it, but it can be confusing with all the missing posts from the crash. Thanks again for keeping up with that list. icon_smile.gif

KeltoKel Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 5:54pm
post #105 of 223

Yep, I am not legal and people I know have paid me for my cakes.

On top of that - I get paid cash to babysit and I have even paid teens to babysit my son. I also pay the neighbor's son cash to mow my lawn. I am sure the professional nannies and landscapers would love to come after me.

chutzpah Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 7:05pm
post #106 of 223

Honestly, if you really think the neighbor's kid mowing your lawn or your friend making a dress is comparable to selling food items from your home then you really have misunderstood what it is all about.

field Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 7:27pm
post #107 of 223

I don't know all the legalities of your state, but I can give you a couple of pointers about getting your name out there. Like so many have stated before, by making cakes for special occasions for family and friends, I have gotten alot of my business. Everyone is looking for a good tasting cake, that is decorated well. Take advantage of the times when you are supposed to bring a dish, like family reunions, church functions, class parties and pot luck dinners. Send a cake into work with your husband! All of these are opportunities to let people see, taste and know that your product is a good one. Believe me the minute people see a pretty cake they want to know who brought it. When they taste how good it is, then they want to know if you can make something for an upcoming event. The biggest thing is don't just give it away! Your materials, time and effort are worth every penny you charge. I used to worry that folks could buy a cake cheaper at Sam's Club, but people who want a quality cake were always willing to spend the money.

KeltoKel Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 7:56pm
post #108 of 223

chutzpah - people talk about the IRS portion of it and that is what I am referring to. It is the same thing!

chutzpah Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 7:57pm
post #109 of 223

Ok. gotcha.

Deb_ Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 7:59pm
post #110 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by chutzpah

Honestly, if you really think the neighbor's kid mowing your lawn or your friend making a dress is comparable to selling food items from your home then you really have misunderstood what it is all about.




I was just going to say the same thing, than I went to the next page and there you were chutzpah icon_smile.gif

When you decide to "be legal and get licensed" you'll understand what we're talking about. Until you go through it, it's hard to really know. So many factors come into play, space, storage, refrigeration, sanitizing, plumbing, doors, etc., etc., etc............. icon_smile.gif

chutzpah Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 8:01pm
post #111 of 223

Yup.... I'm everywhere.... I have my half hour here on CC and then to bed!

kelleym Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 12:28am
post #112 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

Kelly.. maybe we could see if Heath or Jackie could delete the old thread and put your latest update in a new one? That thread is full of info if you can weed through it, but it can be confusing with all the missing posts from the crash. Thanks again for keeping up with that list. icon_smile.gif




Ask and ye shall receive! icon_smile.gif Yay, we have a nice new uncorrupted thread up top now!!

bobwonderbuns Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 1:12am
post #113 of 223

Thanks Kelly! icon_biggrin.gif

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:03am
post #114 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

So many factors come into play, space, storage, refrigeration, sanitizing, plumbing, doors, etc., etc., etc............. icon_smile.gif




Boy, isn't that the truth! I was amazed to learn that in general, home frig/freezers are not as cold as comm'l ones; cleaners used in our homes are not as good as the comm'l cleaners I have to use. And hand-washing dishes in a 2-sink kitchen may not be getting them clean (the water isn't as hot as my comm'l kitchen water and there is no sanitizing chemical dip.) Drains under the comm'l sink are not actually attached to the floor so there is zero chance of any backup coming up into the sink where dishes are. No hand washing in the dish sink ... no food prep in the dish sink .... we have to have separate sinks for those 3 functions.

Yeah .... SO many things that are different!

Kitagrl Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:09am
post #115 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

So many factors come into play, space, storage, refrigeration, sanitizing, plumbing, doors, etc., etc., etc............. icon_smile.gif



Boy, isn't that the truth! I was amazed to learn that in general, home frig/freezers are not as cold as comm'l ones; cleaners used in our homes are not as good as the comm'l cleaners I have to use. And hand-washing dishes in a 2-sink kitchen may not be getting them clean (the water isn't as hot as my comm'l kitchen water and there is no sanitizing chemical dip.) Drains under the comm'l sink are not actually attached to the floor so there is zero chance of any backup coming up into the sink where dishes are. No hand washing in the dish sink ... no food prep in the dish sink .... we have to have separate sinks for those 3 functions.

Yeah .... SO many things that are different!




We don't have that here....the guy did suggest if I ever buy a home that I install a hand washing sink but it was not a necessity. (Anyway right by my kitchen I have a bathroom sink if I wanted to use that.)

I have thermometers in all my cake refrigerators and freezers to make sure they are good and cold, and they are all on the "cold" side of "normal". I have a sanitizing cycle on my newer dishwasher.

I work in a commercial kitchen occasionally, for a caterer....now maybe its because they do food AND cakes...but man...I'd rather eat food from MY kitchen than theirs! That's not to say a commercial kitchen is dirty..man I'd like to have one! LOL.. I'm just saying that you can make a home kitchen just as clean as a commercial one in most respects.

I see what you are saying...I just wanted to point out that those of us legally in our home kitchen make sure things are safe, too.

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:16am
post #116 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I see what you are saying...I just wanted to point out that those of us legally in our home kitchen make sure things are safe, too.


Oh I wasn't disputing that .... I was just sharing some of things that I learned during the conversion process that I didn't know .... as dkelly said, so many other factors come into play that many are not aware of.

FromScratch Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:21am
post #117 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelleym

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

Kelly.. maybe we could see if Heath or Jackie could delete the old thread and put your latest update in a new one? That thread is full of info if you can weed through it, but it can be confusing with all the missing posts from the crash. Thanks again for keeping up with that list. icon_smile.gif



Ask and ye shall receive! icon_smile.gif Yay, we have a nice new uncorrupted thread up top now!!




SWEET!! icon_biggrin.gif

-K8memphis Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:22am
post #118 of 223

In Tennessee you can't have a bathroom open into or toward the kitchen--you have to have a hallway with doors as a buffer in between.

After you wash your hands in the bathroom and re-enter the kitchen, you have to wash your hands again.

FromScratch Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:39am
post #119 of 223

Here in NH you can't use the kitchen sink to wash your hands.. that sink is your "sanitation sink" and you have to use the bathroom sink to wash your hands and have a roll of paper towels in there.

Such different regulations over this great country of ours.. it's enough to drive you batty.

Kitagrl Posted 25 Oct 2008 , 2:42am
post #120 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

In Tennessee you can't have a bathroom open into or toward the kitchen--you have to have a hallway with doors as a buffer in between.

After you wash your hands in the bathroom and re-enter the kitchen, you have to wash your hands again.




I do that sometimes anyway...LOL...bathroom doors are gross...(or can be!)

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