Syrup??

Decorating By myheartsdesire Updated 17 Jan 2009 , 4:15am by ailika

myheartsdesire Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 9:09pm
post #1 of 68

what does a syrup do for a cake?

67 replies
leah_s Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 9:14pm
post #2 of 68

keeps it moist

banba Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 10:13pm
post #3 of 68

As Leahs said keeps it moist and adds flavour.

You can make syrups in contrasting flavours to add different taste dimensions to your cake!

myheartsdesire Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 12:35am
post #4 of 68

If im making a white cake with buttercream icing for a baby shower would you recommend a syrup and how do I make it if yes?

sari66 Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 12:54am
post #5 of 68

You can make just a plain simple syrup equal parts sugar and water brought to a boil then cooled. If making a flavored cake like lemon you can make lemon syrup by adding lemon extract ect.
hth

LeanneW Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 1:12am
post #6 of 68

usually it is applied with a pasrty brush but recently someone shared a tip with me... put it in a squeeze bottle.

just be sure it is cooled before you put it in the plastic bottle.

momma28 Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 1:50am
post #7 of 68

I use it to keep cake moist. As has already been said, equal parts sugar and water brought to a boil. I add vanilla to it also.

Niliquely Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 1:54am
post #8 of 68

But doesn't that make the cake soggy? I was watching Duff and he was pouring alcohol on a cake (granted, he poured the entire bottle) and by the time he wanted to serve the cake, it had settled and the fondant had to be fixed. It made me wonder if pouring syrup wouldn't do the same thing?

momma28 Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 1:57am
post #9 of 68

First off you dont put as much as he did and simple syrup has a different consistency than alcohol. I have never had that problem.

Jopalis Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 2:05am
post #10 of 68

I sometimes put a little liquor in it too. Like Kahlua, Amaretto, Chambord... Use a pastry brush and just give it enough to taste it not soak it.

Niliquely Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 2:11am
post #11 of 68

Is this only for homemade cakes then or what about box mix? And lately I have been using a fabulously moist recipe on here that uses sour cream...would you put syrup on that?

Kitagrl Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 2:23am
post #12 of 68

I personally have an aversion to anything remotely soggy. LOL. I tried using syrup one time on a cake I made, and I HATED the cake when I tasted it.

I just use recipes that produce cakes that are so naturally moist that I don't need to add syrup. Just my own personal preference.

To me, if you make dry cakes and then add syrup (at the catering place I work once in awhile, they DO this with a certain recipe...) that's just nasty IMO.

leah_s Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 1:01pm
post #13 of 68

In pastry school we learned to put a bit of simple syrup on EVERY cake. It's called a "wash." It's not that we're all making dry cakes. It's actually the way professional pastry chefs do things.

myheartsdesire Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 8:18pm
post #14 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

In pastry school we learned to put a bit of simple syrup on EVERY cake. It's called a "wash." It's not that we're all making dry cakes. It's actually the way professional pastry chefs do things.





Are pro pastry chefs always right???

Bethkay Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 8:40pm
post #15 of 68

I, too, went to pastry school where we learned to put simple syrup on every cake. These were a more European-style scratch cake, which tend to be a bit drier and firmer than American cakes made from mixes. So in answer to your question "are pastry chefs always right?" I guess it depends on the type of cake you are making. If you are happy with the moisture level in your cake, don't worry about it. I make cakes like I learned to in school, so I add syrup to them. I think without syrup, my cakes could seem dry to someone not accustomed to a firmer, butter-based scratch cake.

indydebi Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 10:47pm
post #16 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by TERESA77

Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

In pastry school we learned to put a bit of simple syrup on EVERY cake. It's called a "wash." It's not that we're all making dry cakes. It's actually the way professional pastry chefs do things.



Are pro pastry chefs always right???




No one is ALWAYS right ... but if I had to choose between some chic who bakes cakes once in awhile, and someone who had invested the time and money to attend an expensive school to learn pastry from well known experts, guess who's word and opinion I'm gonna go by?

Mike1394 Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 11:22pm
post #17 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by TERESA77

Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

In pastry school we learned to put a bit of simple syrup on EVERY cake. It's called a "wash." It's not that we're all making dry cakes. It's actually the way professional pastry chefs do things.



Are pro pastry chefs always right???



No one is ALWAYS right ... but if I had to choose between some chic who bakes cakes once in awhile, and someone who had invested the time and money to attend an expensive school to learn pastry from well known experts, guess who's word and opinion I'm gonna go by?




I agree Debi.

Mike

LindseyLoocy Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 11:22pm
post #18 of 68
Quote:
Quote:

No one is ALWAYS right ... but if I had to choose between some chic who bakes cakes once in awhile, and someone who had invested the time and money to attend an expensive school to learn pastry from well known experts, guess who's word and opinion I'm gonna go by?





Very well said thumbs_up.gif

-K8memphis Posted 23 Oct 2008 , 11:24pm
post #19 of 68

If a cake gets soggy or you can tell there's an additional liquidy substance in there then too much has been applied.

My default splash (Margaret Braun calls them splashes) is Grand Marnier. It's great in white cake. Or right out of the bottle--just kidding!!

When I put mine on my cake layer I just go once around the area with the squirt bottle with a half inch of space or so in between the lines.

And when you make it just make it to taste. Be careful adding liqeuer to boiling simple syrup it can flame up into your face--for real.

~~~~~~~

Is everybody happy?

banba Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 12:00am
post #20 of 68

I agree with indydebi take the pros word.

Having said that "chics" that bake can learn a heck of a lot from the internet without spending oodles of money attending culinary schools and their advice can be just as valid.

Kitagrl Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 2:21am
post #21 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

In pastry school we learned to put a bit of simple syrup on EVERY cake. It's called a "wash." It's not that we're all making dry cakes. It's actually the way professional pastry chefs do things.




I know.

But I don't like it. icon_smile.gif Of course I'm known to be rather picky...LOL.

Anyway my customers really like my "non washed, unprofessional" cakes so everything is cool. haha.

snarkybaker Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 2:35am
post #22 of 68
Quote:
Quote:


No one is ALWAYS right ... but if I had to choose between some chic who bakes cakes once in awhile, and someone who had invested the time and money to attend an expensive school to learn pastry from well known experts, guess who's word and opinion I'm gonna go by?




You mean nobody other than me icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif , right Deb ?

There are a lot of great reasons to wash a cake- you can add an extra layer of flavor, you can keep a cake moist without the weird ingredients that keep cake mixes moist ( like propylene glycol, which in significant quantities has a laxative effect). A wash with a nice strong rum or other higher proof liquor can inhibit bacterial growth in a cake that will be sitting out for a while ( think about that very complicated fondant covered wedding cake that is going to take a couple of days to get all the Lambeth piping done on.)

Does every cake NEED a wash - no. Can virtually every cake be IMPROVED by a wash of some of liquor, simple syrup or glaze- to quote Sarah Palin..... " You Betcha!"

indydebi Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 2:38am
post #23 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by txkat

You mean nobody other than me icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif , right Deb ?




Well, heck, darlin', I thought that was a given! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

PinkZiab Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 3:50am
post #24 of 68

I got in late, but I gotta step in here as well. No, we pro chefs aren't always right, but bet your ass if we do something to a recipe there is a valid, proven reason for it.

And FYI when someone like LeahS gives a tip or advice, you should perk up and listen, because she knows her shit!

Oh, and yes, I do use simple syrup on EVERY cake, and my cakes are not dry to begin with... very much the opposite.

SugaredUp Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 4:04am
post #25 of 68

Hm... I've been wondering if I should be doing this to my white cake. I bake from scratch, and my white cake is on the drier & firmer side than the other cakes I make...the thing is that it's not DRY, just drier.......... Maybe I will start using a syrup...........

dragonflydreams Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 6:13am
post #26 of 68

. . . thanx leahs . . . for the tip . . . glad I didn't have to go to school to learn how the "pros do it" . . . (wish I could have gone - but the fact that I get the straight goods for free here on CC - gotta love this site) . . . thanx again leahs . . . thumbs_up.gif

Curtsmin24 Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 6:52am
post #27 of 68
Quote:
Quote:

Having said that "chics" that bake can learn a heck of a lot from the internet without spending oodles of money attending culinary schools and their advice can be just as valid.




I agree but, I wouldn't go to a doctor that wasn't certified and did know his stuff to let him do surgery on me. I would you rather go to the certified doctor and let him put his very well spent education money to cut me open. I don't need any other messed up nerves or accidents.

Not everything you read online is true. CC is definitely a good place to be and there are professionals here that have been in business for years and learned from trial and error and as pastry students we pay to be taught all aspects of production and are required to know the many different formulas and the science behind baking as a whole. No one is perfect and what works for some doesn't work for others but, we can try to teach each other what we know and expand from there.

It's one thing to try a recipe, mess it up and go crazy trying to figure out what you did wrong, then to actually have someone there to show you how to fix it and not throw it away. I thought the same way as you a while back and honestly, since I recieved my degree, I have not had to throw away any cake or frosting or dessert (Yet) because I know how to fix it.

I know many decorators stay away from meringue and cooked buttercreams because it's difficult. I know I messed it up alot before I went to school icon_lol.gif (horribly) but now I make all kinds of buttercreams and I love trying different recipes. I love French and Italian buttercreams they are definitly a piece of birthday.gif

Sorry to ramble, just my 2 Cents!!! icon_smile.gif

LeanneW Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 4:29pm
post #28 of 68

I'm not a pastry chef, but I bake in a kitchen with several of them...

I was told that syrup doesn't just add moisture, it helps the cake stay together when it is sliced, you don't get crumby bits falling off if the syrup was evenly distributed and nicely soaked through.

I use syrup now on every cake. I haven't tried flavoring it but that will be my next experiment.

Curtsmin24 Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 4:50pm
post #29 of 68

That's very true leanne and flavoring is definitly an added bonus. I just made a poundcake with pinnapple and rum flavored syrup and I recieved a lot of positive feedback and 3 new cake orders. I covered the cake with a very thin layer of marshmallow fondant and it was delicious. I used a box poundcake because I really didn't have the time to gather all the other ingredients for a scratch cake. Filled it with French buttercream and voila! I usually don't eat cake anymore but, I loved it. Everyone had three slices!!! It was moist and sweet, not dry at all.

It is also really good to make sauces for ice cream....mmmmmm icon_smile.gif

LeanneW Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 4:58pm
post #30 of 68

I've recently started using frecnh bc for the fillings in my cake too. I love it. it is so rich and the color inside the cake doesn't really matter anyway.

also it's a great way to use up all those yolks from making IMBC.

I recently did a choc cake with choc french bc as the filling, it was awesome.

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