Ganache Covered Wedding Cake

Decorating By loriemoms Updated 20 Oct 2008 , 1:11pm by loriemoms

loriemoms Posted 19 Oct 2008 , 7:39pm
post #1 of 9

Have any of you done a ganache covered wedding cake? I have done many cakes with ganache on the top of the tier, and one tier birthday cakes, but never a wedding cake. Do you cover the cake and then let it "dry" before stacking? How messy is it to work with? Any special recipes I should be considering?

8 replies
loriemoms Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 11:50am
post #2 of 9

I guess this must be a new thing? I have looked at photos and see some wedding cakes with ganache on it, but haven't run across any methods...do I just refrigerate it to let it set? How long can it be at room temp? Has anyone done this? Thanks.

pbeckwith Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 12:00pm
post #3 of 9

I'm curious about this too. My friends' favorite cake is chocolate with peanut butter buttercream with the ganache on top dripping over the edge - it seems to be the great "comfort cake". I think ganache is pretty strong to cover an entire cake - a little overwhelming? My ganache is just chocolate and cream - what recipe will you use? Is there one that isn't so "rich"?

OhioBaker Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 12:00pm
post #4 of 9

I don't have the answer, but I would like to know too.

Here's a bump.

loriemoms Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 12:51pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbeckwith

I'm curious about this too. My friends' favorite cake is chocolate with peanut butter buttercream with the ganache on top dripping over the edge - it seems to be the great "comfort cake". I think ganache is pretty strong to cover an entire cake - a little overwhelming? My ganache is just chocolate and cream - what recipe will you use? Is there one that isn't so "rich"?




I cheat and use a wonderful ganache that comes in a big 20 lb pail. I use it for filing, and for covering smaller cakes, but never did a wedding cake. I wonder if there is a recipe that is a little stiffer and not as messy for cutting and such?

indydebi Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 12:52pm
post #6 of 9

I've done one. It was the first time I did the dowel-down-the-center because I knew it had to be assembled before delivery.

I just stacked up the entire cake and poured the ganache over the top. Used the spatula to push it over the sides as needed.

I ganached it in the morning and delivered it around 5:00. I never refrigerate my cakes.

Here's the pic .... http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=987333 .... I don't like all the flowers on it, but the bride left a full bouquet with orders to use ALL of the flowers on the (tiny) cake.

loriemoms Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 12:56pm
post #7 of 9

Thanks Deb...Luckilly it is a smaller cake too. It will be three tiers but only 50 servings) and I was thinking the same thing, just pour it over the entire cake? how did you prevent crumbs..did you cover it with buttercream first or anything?

indydebi Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 1:01pm
post #8 of 9

This one was a small cake, too.... about 50 people. The bottom tier is a stryofoam.

Yes, I iced each tier in BC ... get it as smooth as you can because the ganache will find each tiny little bump.

Odd part of the story ..... I was transporting this cake (my first assembled cake!!) .... and a 12x18 sheet cake that was also ganached. The tiered cake transported fine. The sheet cake, which was laying flat in the back of the van, had cracked ganache!! Luckily they planned on cutting this one in the back so no one but the kitchen staff ever saw it.

loriemoms Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 1:11pm
post #9 of 9

that is interesting!!! I know with my kitchen cakes, I just put them on two sandwiched cake boards instead of a drum..maybe the ganache was too heavy for the base?

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