Sift Box Cake Mix??

Decorating By nesweetcake Updated 5 Sep 2014 , 3:33am by ddiluzio

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nesweetcake Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 2:57am
post #1 of 33

Please tell me if there are any benefits to sifting your box cake mix.
Also if anyone has the best ever chocolate scratch or/white scratch
rec would love for you to share.

32 replies
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kakeladi Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 3:06am
post #2 of 33

In over 25 yrs I have only done that once or twice after reading that it would imporve my cake. I don't think there was any difference so I stopped doing it.

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GeminiRJ Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 11:50am
post #3 of 33

I was told to sift the mix if it had been frozen. But since I've never frozen a box mix, I've never sifted! I can't imagine there would be a noticeable difference.

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mamacc Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 12:03pm
post #4 of 33

I usually do sift cake mixes....for me it makes the texture of the cake a little nicer, tighter finer crumb.

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indydebi Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 1:12pm
post #5 of 33

Sifting the cake mix was the very first suggestion from CC that I tried. To be very very honest, my initial reaction when I read about doing it was "SOMEbody has WAY too much time on their hands!"

Boy, was I wrong.

Sifting the cake mix cut down on mixing time, removed all the little lumps in the batter (which is why I had to mix it longer), and the cake texture came out BEAUTIFUL!!!!!!!!!!!!! REALLY reduces the air holes in the cake texture .... my cake texture looks like a fine pound cake.

I will never NOT sift a cake mix ever again.

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7yyrt Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 3:35pm
post #6 of 33

I don't sift, but I whisk it when I dump it in the bowl to get all of the lumps out. It becomes very soft and fine.

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darandon Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 3:52pm
post #7 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Sifting the cake mix was the very first suggestion from CC that I tried. To be very very honest, my initial reaction when I read about doing it was "SOMEbody has WAY too much time on their hands!"

Boy, was I wrong.

Sifting the cake mix cut down on mixing time, removed all the little lumps in the batter (which is why I had to mix it longer), and the cake texture came out BEAUTIFUL!!!!!!!!!!!!! REALLY reduces the air holes in the cake texture .... my cake texture looks like a fine pound cake.

I will never NOT sift a cake mix ever again.



I totally agree with you on this. I never sifted until I found this web site. Now my husband and daughter both sift the mix if they are making a cake.

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tiggy2 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 4:38pm
post #8 of 33

Exactly what indydebi said icon_smile.gif

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JEM530 Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 5:53pm
post #9 of 33

I agree that sifting does give my cakes a nicer texture. I also find that there are less crumbs when I level and torte my cakes. I always sift unless I am really pressed for time. icon_smile.gif

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Donnagardner Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 6:13pm
post #10 of 33

I agree with indydeb. I will ALWAYS sift my cake mixes. It does make a huge difference.

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ThreeDGirlie Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 6:14pm
post #11 of 33

Not to mention the hard little lumpies left when I am done sifting...

I ALWAYS sift cake mixes, my dry ingredients for scratch recipes and powderd sugar. Always.

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Swede-cakes Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 6:27pm
post #12 of 33

I sift my mixes, to improve the crumb texture, but also do it for another reason. I sift to remove any rare but possible "foreign" objects. Like, the 1/4" piece of white plastic I found last summer, or anything else that might be in there from a manufacturing facility. icon_confused.gif

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becklynn Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 6:37pm
post #13 of 33

I agree - sifting gives the cake a better texture. I always sift the day before and store in ziploc bags. 2 boxes of sifted mix fits nicely into a gallon ziploc storage bag!

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nesweetcake Posted 16 Oct 2008 , 7:33pm
post #14 of 33

Thanks so much for your input. I had been sifting, but wanted to
make sure I was doing it right. You are all great. Thanks!

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sweetisome Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 12:46am
post #15 of 33

I never heard of this but I thought about it...asked my dad once and he didn't think it would make a difference. Boy am I glad I found this thread. I will be sifting my next cake you bet!

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indydebi Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 12:54am
post #16 of 33

sweetisome, is your dad a baker, too?

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sweetisome Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 2:52am
post #17 of 33

Yes indybebi, he is. He graduated from Johnson and Wales as a pastry chef. He hates that I use box mixes, but for my purposes (which is what I affectionatly refer to as a hobby for profit)it just makes more sense. When I asked him about sifting it was specificly because I was looking for a tighter , finer crumb without sacrificing the lightness and moisture of my cakes.

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indydebi Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 3:26am
post #18 of 33

wow, talk about having a great resource handy!!

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sweetisome Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 3:34am
post #19 of 33

I do most of my own research, but whenever I have a real technical problem...a call to Dad really comes in handy!

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missmeg Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 3:24pm
post #20 of 33

I swear by sifting cake mix boxes, for all the reasons given. It has made such a difference in the crumb of my cake, as well as the lack of large air pockets.

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abslu Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 4:52pm
post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by becklynn

I agree - sifting gives the cake a better texture. I always sift the day before and store in ziploc bags. 2 boxes of sifted mix fits nicely into a gallon ziploc storage bag!




Good to know!! Thanks becklynn!!! This will help me TONS!!!

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banba Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 9:37pm
post #22 of 33

I always sift all dry ingredients, it's what I was always taught.

Sifting breaks down any little lumps and aerates compounded mixtures.

The higher you hold your sieve the better.

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mixinvixen Posted 17 Oct 2008 , 9:45pm
post #23 of 33

when i sift, i have found pieces in my mix so hard that when i tried to smash them with a spoon, they shot out from under it, never to be seen again!! i find it hard to believe that they would have broken down during cooking if i hadn't have sifted them out first.

i also sifted out a piece of black plastic about the size of a watermelon seed the other day when i was mixing up devil's food mixes...not sure where that came from!

the only time i sift and still dump is when i'm sifting something like strawberry mix with the little pieces of strawberries or one with hershey pieces in it. i sift, then carefully look over all the little pieces before dumping on in...that is how i found the piece of black plastic. you can never be too careful.

i also sift out my sugar...you 'd be amazed at the huge chunks i find when i'm done...i just toss them.

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alidpayne Posted 19 Oct 2008 , 5:12pm
post #24 of 33

I always sift ALL my dry ingredients. I don't use an actual sifter though. I use a cone shaped "strainer" that I bought at the dollar store. It is a tight mesh like a strainer, but much easier to use and faster. I dump in some flour, sugar, cake mix, or whatever, then "stir" with a spatula or spoon. Works great.

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mamacc Posted 19 Oct 2008 , 6:11pm
post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by mixinvixen

when i sift, i have found pieces in my mix so hard that when i tried to smash them with a spoon, they shot out from under it, never to be seen again!! i find it hard to believe that they would have broken down during cooking if i hadn't have sifted them out first.

i also sifted out a piece of black plastic about the size of a watermelon seed the other day when i was mixing up devil's food mixes...not sure where that came from!

the only time i sift and still dump is when i'm sifting something like strawberry mix with the little pieces of strawberries or one with hershey pieces in it. i sift, then carefully look over all the little pieces before dumping on in...that is how i found the piece of black plastic. you can never be too careful.

i also sift out my sugar...you 'd be amazed at the huge chunks i find when i'm done...i just toss them.




I know!!...there is a LOT of hard chunks in the mix and sugar. I don't use a regular sifter either. I use a wire strainer style. The one time I used one of those hand squeeze kind I clogged it up so bad with cake mix it was nearly impossible to get out!

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KKC Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 12:38pm
post #26 of 33

I always sift, sift, sift. I have noticed a difference in the texture of my cakes. The one that i did not sift had all sorts of lumps in the batter and the one that i did sift the batter was silky smooth.

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Win Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 1:04pm
post #27 of 33

I was always taught to sift dry ingredients as well, but mostly applied that to scratch cakes. Years ago, I noticed that cake mixes had lumps that just wouldn't seem to mix out in the normal amount of "mix time" allocated on the box. I found it to be very frustrating so I decided to start sifting even boxed caked mixes right then and there --have done so ever since.

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seashelley68 Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 1:12pm
post #28 of 33

I never sift my cake mix. I find that the one thing I have to have is my Kitchen Aid stand mixer. It definitely makes a difference in the texture of the cake. I have used different method to mix the cake when I have been away from my house and it's just not the same.

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indydebi Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 1:34pm
post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by seashelley68

I never sift my cake mix. I find that the one thing I have to have is my Kitchen Aid stand mixer. It definitely makes a difference in the texture of the cake. I have used different method to mix the cake when I have been away from my house and it's just not the same.




I used a KA for 20+ years and now have a 20-qt Hobart ...... if you've never sifted, give it a try. I promise, you'll never go back.

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Win Posted 20 Oct 2008 , 2:11pm
post #30 of 33

I was always taught to sift dry ingredients as well, but mostly applied that to scratch cakes. Years ago, I noticed that cake mixes had lumps that just wouldn't seem to mix out in the normal amount of "mix time" allocated on the box. I found it to be very frustrating so I decided to start sifting even boxed caked mixes right then and there --have done so ever since.

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